Tag Archives: Terence O’Neill

1st July – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

1st July

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Wednesday 1 July 1970

Reginald Maudling, then Home Secretary, paid a visit to Northern Ireland.

As he boarded the flight out of Northern Ireland again he was reported to have said:

“For God’s sake bring me a large Scotch. What a bloody awful country!”.

The Criminal Justice (Temporary Provisions) Act was passed by the Stormont government introducing a mandatory prison sentence of six months for rioting.

Sunday 1 July 1973

William Whitelaw, then Secretary of State, travelled to Chequers for a meeting with at 8.00pm with Edward Heath, then British Prime Minster.

[Public Records 1972 – Released 1 January 2003: Note of meeting between William Whitelaw, then Secretary of State, and Edward Heath, then British Prime Minster. ]

.

Wednesday 1 July 1981

hungry strikes

See Hunger Strike

Thursday 1 July 1982

The Garda Síochána (the Irish police) found a large cache of bombs at Castlefin, County Donegal.

Wednesday 1 July 1992

         

Gregory Burns, John  Dignam & Aidan Starrs

The bodies of three Irish Republican Army (IRA) members were found in different parts of south Armagh.

The three men were shot dead by the IRA which alleged that the men had acted as informers for the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) and MI5 (British Security Service).

In a significant shift in approach the Unionist parties agreed to talks with politicians from the Republic of Ireland under Strand Two of the political talks (later known as the Brooke / Mayhew talks).

The Royal Irish Regiment (RIR) came into being. The regiment was formed by the amalgamation of the Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR) and the Royal Irish Rangers.

[The UDR had been the subject of sustained criticism from Nationalists since its formation in 1970. The merger meant that the former UDR battalions, a total of approximately 6,000 soldiers, would continue to operate in Northern Ireland while the two former Rangers battalions would be reduced to a single general service battalion, approximately 900 soldiers, that would serve abroad as well as in Northern Ireland.]

Thursday 1 July 1993

The annual report of the Standing Advisory Commission on Human Rights (SACHR) was published. SACHR called for a review of the legislation that covered the use of lethal force by the security forces.

The report also supported the use of video recording of Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) interviews of people suspected of paramilitary related offences.

Tuesday 1 July 1997

The offices of the Irish News were slightly damaged in an arson attack.

The Garvaghy Road Residents Coalition announced that they were organising a street festival for Sunday 6 July 1997.

This would coincide with the disputed Orange Parade.

Bertie Ahern, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), and his ministerial team held talks in Belfast with Marjorie (Mo) Mowlam, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, about the ‘marching season’. Ahern said that it would be a mistake to force the march along the Garvaghy Road.

The Northern Ireland Office (NIO) and the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) said that they would only announce their decision on whether or not the march could proceed along the Garvaghy Road, two or three days in advance.

This was in spite of a promise by Mowlam to reveal the decision at lease six days in advance.

Wednesday 1 July 1998

First Meeting of ‘Shadow’ Assembly ‘First Minister Designate’ and ‘Deputy First Minister Designate’ Elected

All the political parties who had won seats during the Northern Ireland Assembly election took their places in the new Assembly chamber at Stormont. The Assembly met in ‘shadow’ form as powers had not yet been devolved. Those present included the parties, and candidates, who had opposed the Good Friday Agreement.

 

[The event was televised live in Northern Ireland and many people found it almost surreal to see Ian Paisley, then leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), sitting in the same debating chamber as Gerry Adams, then President of Sinn Féin (SF).]

During the first session on the new Northern Ireland Assembly David Trimble, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), was elected ‘First Minister Designate’ of the new Assembly. Seamus Mallon, then deputy leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), was elected ‘Deputy First Minister Designate’.

John Alderdice, formerly the leader of the Alliance Party of Northern Ireland (APNI), was appointed as the ‘Presiding Officer Designate’ (the Speaker) of the new Assembly.

Thursday 1 July 1999

Tony Blair, then British Prime Minister, claimed that the Stormont talks had brought about a “seismic shift” in the political landscape of Northern Ireland.

The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) continued to insist that the Irish Republican Army (IRA) should decommission its weapons and explosives in parallel with the creation of the Northern Ireland Executive.

Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) sources believed a possible solution was emerging. (Blair’s attendance at the Stormont talks meant that he missed the opening of the Scottish Parliament.)

The Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) won a council by-election in Lisburn. Peter Robinson, then Deputy Leader of the DUP, said this victory in a Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) safe seat was a “final warning” to David Trimble  then leader of the UUP.

Those Loyalist paramilitary groups who were then on ceasefire issued a warning to “hooligans and looters” that pro-Drumcree rioting would not be tolerated.

drumcree church at night

See Drumcree Conflict

William Whitelaw, who had been appointed as the first Secretary of State for Northern Ireland following the imposition of Direct Rule in 1972, died in London aged 81.

Sunday 1 July 2001

Trimble Resigned As First Minister

The resignation of David Trimble, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), as First Minister took effect as of midnight on Saturday.

Trimble called on Tony Blair, then British Prime Minister, to suspend the Northern Ireland Assembly (NIA) and the other institutions established under the Good Friday agreement.

The procedures of the NIA allowed for a six-week period during which a new First Minister and Deputy First Minister would have to be elected otherwise new elections to the Assembly would have to be called.

Another option would be for the British government to suspend the Assembly and the institutions and reintroduce Direct Rule. The final option was for there to be a temporary suspension which would have the effect of extending the period in which to find agreement.

The Assembly was suspended for 24 hours beginning on Friday 10 August 2001.

 

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

10 People lost their lives on the 1st July between 1972 – 1992

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01 July 1972
Paul Jobling  (19)

nfNI
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
English visitor. Found shot on waste ground, Westway Drive, Glencairn, Belfast.

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01 July 1972
Daniel Hayes  (40)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Found shot in playground, Penrith Street, Shankill, Belfast.

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01 July 1973
Reginald Roberts   (25)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while on British Army (BA) foot patrol, Bull Ring, Ballymurphy, Belfast

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01 July 1976
Brian Palmer   (39)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot while in Finaghy Roadhouse Bar, Finaghy Road North, Belfast. Alleged informer.

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01 July 1980


Terence O’Neill   (26)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC)
Shot while running away from Whiterock Community Centre, Ballymurphy, Belfast.

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01 July 1986


Robert Hill  (22)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Killed by booby trap bomb attached to his car outside his home, Drumaness, near Ballynahinch, County Down.

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01 July 1989


Norman Annett   (56)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Shot while visiting his mother’s home, Carhill Road, Garvagh, County Derry

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01 July 1992


Gregory Burns   (34)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Found shot Cullaville Road, near Crossmaglen, County Armagh. Alleged informer.

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01 July 1992


John Dignam  (32)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Found shot at Mountain Road, Lislea, County Armagh. Alleged informer.

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01 July 1992


Aidan Starrs  (29)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA), K

illed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Found shot at Dundalk Road, near Newtownhamilton, County Armagh. Alleged informer.

——————————————

 

25th May – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

25th May

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Tuesday 25 May 1971

Michael Willets

A British soldier was killed in an Irish Republican Army (IRA) bomb attack on the joint Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) / British Army (BA) base on the Springfield Road in Belfast.

Saturday 25 May 1974

Day 11 of the UWC strike

Alfred Stilges (52), a Catholic civilian, was beaten to death by Loyalist paramilitaries in Forthriver Road, Glencairn, Belfast.

Harold Wilson, then British Prime Minister, made a broadcast [text of speech] on British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) television and radio at 10.15pm.

[The speech proved to be totally counter-productive. At one point in the speech Wilson referred to ‘spongers’ – meaning the Ulster Workers’ Council (UWC) and its supporters.

However most Protestants took the reference as a slight on them. Indeed some Protestants took to wearing small sponges in their lapels the following day as a gesture of support for the strike.]

[Public Records 1974 – Released 1 January 2005: Fax sent on behalf of Harold Wilson to Liam Cosgrave, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister). The fax contained the text of a statement that Wilson was due to give on British television later that day.] [ Sunningdale; Ulster Workers’ Council Strike. ]

Tuesday 25 May 1976

The Ulster Service Corps, a Loyalist paramilitary grouping, announced that it was going to mount ‘patrols’ because of the ‘deteriorating security situation’.

Wednesday 25 May 1977

James Callaghan, then British Prime Minister, announced that an all-party Speaker’s Conference was to be established to consider the merits of the argument for more Northern Ireland Members of Parliament.

Thursday 25 May 1978

Brian McKinney

 

 

Brian McKinney and John McClory, both Catholic civilians, were abducted by the Irish Republican Army (IRA) and ‘dissapeared’.

John McClory
John McClory

Their bodies were recovered on 29 June 1999

See The Disappeared

 

Friday 25 May 1984 Security forces in Northern Ireland discovered large quantities of explosives in County Tyrone and County Down. In the United States of America (USA) both houses of Congress unanimously backed the Report of the New Ireland Forum.

Wednesday 25 May 1988

Government White Paper

A White Paper on fair employment was issued by the British government. Suggestions included the compulsory monitoring of the religious composition of workforces in companies in Northern Ireland. A new Fair Employment Commission (FEC) was proposed to replace the Fair Employment Agency (FEA).

[A Bill was brought forward on 15 December 1988.]

Saturday 25 May 1991

Eddie Fullerton, then a Sinn Féin (SF) councillor in Buncrana, County Donegal, Republic of Ireland, was shot dead by the Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF), a cover name (pseudonym) used by the Ulster Defence Association (UDA).

 

[This killing took place despite a Loyalist ceasefire announced by the Combined Loyalist Military Command (CLMC) that began at midnight on 29 April 1991. The UDA stated that the ceasefire did not apply to the Republic of Ireland.]

Terence O’Neill

A British soldier was killed in an Irish Republican Army (IRA) attack in Belfast.

Thursday 25 May 1995

Bill Clinton, then President of the United States of America (USA), addressed the investment conference in Washington, USA. He called for an end to paramilitary violence, ‘punishment’ beatings, and intimidation, in Northern Ireland. Clinton also announced a number of economic initiatives.

Saturday 25 May 1996

Dessie McCleery, then a member of the Irish National Liberation Army (INLA) ‘GHQ’ faction, was shot dead in central Belfast. The killing was part of a continuing INLA feud.

25 May 1998

Those responsible for the picket outside the Catholic church in Harryville, Ballymena, announced that they were calling a halt to the weekly Saturday evening protest.

The protest had begun in September 1996 and policing costs were estimated at £2 million.

The Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) named Billy Hutchinson, then a Progressive Unionist Party (PUP) councillor, as its contact with the arms decommissioning body.

According to British statistics more than 5,300 women with addresses in the Republic of Ireland had abortions in Britain during 1997. This is the highest figure on record; in 1987 the figure was 3,673.

 

  ——————————————

Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

11  People lost their lives on the 25th May between 1971 – 1996

 ——————————————

25 May 1971


Michael Willets   (27)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by time bomb left inside Springfield Road Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) / British Army (BA) base, Belfast.

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25 May 1973


Joseph Matthews   (30)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Defence Association (UDA)
Found shot at Giant’s Ring, near Shaw’s Bridge, Belfast.

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25 May 1974
Alfred Stilges   (52)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Found beaten to death in partially-built house, Forthriver Road, Glencairn, Belfast.

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25 May 1975
Albert Ballantine   (19)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Found shot at side of Lettercor Road, near Gortin, County Tyrone.

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25 May 1978


Brian McKinney   (22)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Abducted on his way to work, Andersonstown, Belfast. Remains eventually found, on general instructions from the IRA, buried in bogland, Colgagh, near Inniskeen, County Monaghan, on 29 June 1999.

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25 May 1978


John McClory   (18)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Abducted on his way to work, Andersonstown, Belfast. Remains eventually found, on general instructions from the IRA, buried in bogland, Colgagh, near Inniskeen, County Monaghan, on 29 June 1999.

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25 May 1981
Thomas Ritchie   (28)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while on Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR) mobile patrol, Gulladuff, near Maghera, County Derry.

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25 May 1986
Francis Hegarty  (45)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Found shot, Cavan Road, near Castlederg, County Tyrone. Alleged informer.

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25 May 1991


Eddie Fullerton   (56)

nfNIRI
Status: Civilian Political Activist (CivPA),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Sinn Fein (SF) Councillor. Shot at his home, Cockhill Cottages, Buncrana, County Donegal.

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25 May 1991


Terence O’Neill   (44)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by grenade, dropped into compound at British Army (BA) base, from adjoining derelict building, North Howard Street, Falls, Belfast.

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25 May 1996


Dessie McCleery   (37)

Catholic
Status: Irish National Liberation Army (INLA),

Killed by: Irish National Liberation Army (INLA)
Shot, while in pizza restaurant, Bankmore Street, off Dublin Road, Belfast. Internal Irish National Liberation Army (INLA) dispute.

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20th May – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

20th May

Monday 20 May 1968

Terence O’Neill

 

 

Terence O’Neill, then Northern Ireland Prime Minister, was showered with eggs, flour and stones after a meeting of the Woodvale Unionist Association.

Monday 20 May 1974

Day 6 of the UWC strike

Michael Mallon (20), a Catholic civilian, was shot dead by the Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF) a covername for the Ulster Defence Association (UDA), and left by the side of the road at Shaw’s Bridge, Belfast.

Many roads in Northern Ireland were closed because of barricades. Electricity generation dropped to about one-third of normal levels. People were asked only to use telephones in an emergency.

Five hundred additional troops arrived in Northern Ireland.

An advertisement in the News Letter (a Belfast newspaper), which had been placed by Unionist politicians, called for support of the strike.

Stanley Orme, then Minister of Sate at the Northern Ireland Office (NIO), repeated the government’s position of not negotiating with the Ulster Workers’ Council (UWC) Strike Committee.

 [Public Records 1974 – Released 1 January 2005:

Note of a statement made by Stanley Orme, then Minister of Sate at the Northern Ireland Office (NIO), to the House of Commons. The statement sought to explain the circumstances surrounding the decision by Merlyn Rees, then Secretary of Sate for Northern Ireland, to announce a State of Emergency (Section 40, Northern Ireland Constitution Act 1973) on 19 May 1974.]

Friday 20 May 1977

Daniel McCooey (20), a Catholic civilian, died three weeks after he had been severely beaten by members of a British Army foot patrol in Castle Street, Belfast.

A member of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) was shot dead by the Irish Republican Army (IRA) in County Tyrone.

Tuesday 20 May 1980

Margaret Thatcher, then British Prime Minister, stated in the House of Commons:

“The future of the constitutional affairs of Northern Ireland is a matter for the people of Northern Ireland, this government and this parliament and no one else.”

This statement was made the day before Charles Haughey, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), was due to arrive in London with talks with Thatcher.

Wednesday 20 May 1981

District Council Elections

Local government elections were held in Northern Ireland against the backdrop of the continuing hunger strike. In the increased tension in the region, ‘moderate’ parties all suffered a decline in support.

The Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) achieved 26.6 per cent of the vote compared to the 26.5 per cent recorded by the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP). The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) obtained 17.5 per cent of the first preference votes compared to 20.6 per cent in 1977.

 See  1981 Hunger Strike

Monday 20 May 1985

 

RUC  Collage

Four Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) officers in a mobile patrol were killed when the Irish Republican Army (IRA) exploded a bomb in a parked trailer at Killeen, County Down.

Tuesday 20 May 1986

Nicholas Scott, then a Northern Ireland Office (NIO) Minister, provided information in the House of Commons on the level of intimidation that Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) officers had faced from Loyalists during protests at the Anglo-Irish Agreement (AIA).

Scott said that there had been 368 cases of intimidation.

[Later information provided by the RUC indicated that the final number was over 500 homes attacked and 150 RUC families forced to move.]

Monday 20 May 1991

The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) announced that it was leaving the political talks (later known as the Brooke / Mayhew talks) until such time as the procedures for the main talks were agreed by the other parties.

Thursday 20 May 1993

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) exploded a bomb, estimated at 1,000 pounds, in Glengall Street, Belfast. Thirteen people were injured in the explosion. The bomb was placed outside the Grand Opera House and close to the Headquarters of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP).

[Later estimates put the cost of the damage at £6.5 million.]

Friday 20 May 1994

There was serious rioting in Protestant areas of Belfast following the appearance in Belfast Magistrates’ Court of a man accused of ‘directing the activities’ of the Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF), a cover name (pseudonym) used by the Ulster Defence Association (UDA).

Monday 20 May 1996

Gerry Adams, then President of Sinn Féin (SF), said that SF was prepared to accept the six ‘Mitchell Principles’ if the other parties agreed to them.

Tuesday 20 May 1997

John Hume, then leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), tabled a motion in the House of Commons calling on the British government to conduct a new inquiry into the events of ‘Bloody Sunday‘ in Derry on 30 January 1972.

Jack Straw, then British Home Secretary, announced that two Irish Republican Army (IRA) prisoners, Danny McNamee and Liam McCotter, would be transferred to prisons in Northern Ireland.

Wednesday 20 May 1998

Blair’s Pledges

Tony Blair, then British Prime Minister, delivered a speech at the Coleraine campus of the University of Ulster in which he unveiled a hand-written set of pledges to the people of Northern Ireland in advance of the Referendum on 22 May 1998. The text of the pledges was as follows: “I pledge to the people of Northern Ireland:

  • No change in the status of Northern Ireland without the express consent of the people of Northern Ireland.
  • Power to take decisions returned to a Northern Ireland Assembly, with accountable North/South co-operation.
  • Fairness and equality guaranteed for all.
  • Those who use or threaten violence excluded from the Government of Northern Ireland.
  • Prisoners kept in unless violence is given up for good.

Whatever the Referendum result, as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom I will continue to work for stability and prosperity for all the people of Northern Ireland

.” Bill Clinton, then President of the United States of America (USA), sent a personal message to the people of Northern Ireland calling on them to vote ‘Yes’ in the

forthcoming referendum.

In the final hours of campaigning David Trimble, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), and Ian Paisley, then leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), took part in a live television debate.

The 10 minute encounter took place on the BBC’s ‘Newsline’ programme. The debate was heated with Paisley accusing Trimble of being prepared to “break the union”.

Thursday 20 May 1999

There were disturbances involving Loyalists and the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) in Portadown, County Armagh.

The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) delegation did not arrive for a second day of talks at Downing Street. The UUP stated that it had not been informed of the continuation of the talks.

Sinn Féin (SF) accused the UUP of a deliberate snub of the Prime Minister.

garvaghy road residents coalition 2

The Garvaghy Road Residents Coalition (GRRC) called for the Parades Commission to re-route the part of the Drumcree parade which passed close to Obins Street and St John’s Catholic Church.

Paul Berry, then a Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) Assemblyman, responded in an interview on Radio Ulster and said Loyalists would not be stopped from getting down the Garvaghy Road,

“If it is a matter of taking the law into our own hands then we are going to have to do it. That is a threat.”

(Reported in ‘Fortnight’ magazine, September 1999, p6). Mr Berry later denied making a threat. Planners from the Department of the Environment (DOE) in Northern Ireland told a regional planning conference in Dublin that Derry would be developed as the growth hub of the north-west.

 

 ——————————————

Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

10 People lost their lives on the 20th  May between 1972 – 1986

 ——————————————

20 May 1972
Henry Gillespie  (32)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while on Ulster Defence Regiment mobile patrol, Killyliss, near Dungannon, County Tyrone.

 ——————————————

20 May 1974
Miicahel Mallon   (20)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Defence Association (UDA)
Found shot by side of Milltown Road, Shaw’s Bridge, Belfast.

 ——————————————

20 May 1977


Robert North  (52)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty reservist. Shot while driving school bus along Drumlee Road, near Benburb, County Tyrone

 ——————————————

20 May 1977


 Daniel McCooey  (20)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Died three weeks after being badly beaten by British Army (BA) foot patrol, Castle Street, Belfast.

 ——————————————

20 May 1979


Stanley Wray  (50)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Shot shortly after leaving Claremont Presbyterian Church, Northland Road, Derry.

 ——————————————

20 May 1985


William Wilson   (28)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by remote controlled bomb, hidden in parked trailer, detonated when Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) mobile patrol passed, Killeen, County Armagh.

 ——————————————

20 May 1985


Stephen Rodgers   (19)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by remote controlled bomb, hidden in parked trailer, detonated when Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) mobile patrol passed, Killeen, County Armagh.

 ——————————————

20 May 1985


David Baird   (22)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by remote controlled bomb, hidden in parked trailer, detonated when Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) mobile patrol passed, Killeen, County Armagh.

 ——————————————

20 May 1985

Tracey Doak   (21)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by remote controlled bomb, hidden in parked trailer, detonated when Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) mobile patrol passed, Killeen, County Armagh.

 ——————————————

20 May 1986
Colm McKevitt  (30)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot shortly after being abducted from his sister’s home, Killeen, County Armagh. Alleged informer.

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