Tag Archives: IRA Internal Security Unit – Nutting Squad

Kevin Fulton ( aka Peter Keeley ) – Double Agent ?

Kevin Fulton aka Peter Keeley – Double Agent ?

Kevin Fulton is a British agent from NewryNorthern Ireland, who allegedly spied on the Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA) for MI5. He is believed to be in London, where he is suing the Crown, claiming his British military handlers cut off their connections and financial aid to him. In 2004 he reportedly sued the Andersonstown News, an Irish republican news outlet in Belfast, for revealing his identity as well as publishing his photograph. The result of that suit has not been made public.

– Disclaimer –

The views and opinions expressed in these blog posts/documentaries are solely intended to educate and provide background information to those interested in the Troubles of Northern Ireland. They in no way reflect my own opinions and I take no responsibility for any inaccuracies or factual errors

Undercover activity

In Unsung Hero, “Fulton” claims he worked undercover as a British Army agent within the IRA. He was believed to have operated predominantly inside the IRA’s South Down Brigade, as well as concentrating on the heavy IRA activity in South Armagh. “Fulton” and four members of his IRA unit in Newry reportedly pioneered the use of “flash guns” to detonate bombs.

In one incident, “Fulton” was questioned on responsibility for designing firing mechanisms used in a horizontal mortar attack on a Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) armoured patrol car on Merchants Quay, NewryCounty Down, on 27 March 1992. Colleen McMurray, a constable (aged 34) died and another constable was seriously injured.

“Fulton” claims he tipped off his MI5 handler that an attack was likely.

IRA Informer on British Intelligence | Kevin Fulton

Arrest

On 5 November 2006, he was released without charge after being arrested in London, and transferred to Belfast to be questioned about his knowledge or involvement in the deaths of Irish People’s Liberation Organisation member Eoin Morley (aged 23), Royal Ulster Constabulary officer Colleen McMurray (34), and Ranger Cyril Smith (aged 21).

“I personally did not kill people”,

he stated. His lawyers asked the British Ministry of Defence to provide him and his family with new identities, relocation and immediate implementation of the complete financial package, including his army pension and other discharge benefits, which he had been reportedly promised by the MoD for his covert tour of duty. His ex-wife, Margaret Keeley, filed a lawsuit in early 2014 for full access to documents relating to her ex-husband.

She claims to have been wrongfully arrested and falsely imprisoned during a three-day period in 1994 following a purported attempt by the IRA to assassinate a senior detective in East Belfast.

Legal cases

On 26 November 2013, it was reported that The Irish News had won a legal battle after a judge ruled against Keeley’s lawsuit against the newspaper for breach of privacy and copyright, by publishing his photograph, which thereby also, he argued, endangered his life. Belfast District Judge Isobel Brownlie stated at least twice that she was not impressed with Keeley’s evidence and described him as “disingenuous”. Under British law, Keeley will also be billed for the newspaper’s legal costs.

On 31 January 2014, the Belfast High Court ruled that “Fulton” had to pay damages to Eilish Morley, the mother of IPLO member Eoin Morley, shot dead at age 23 by the IRA. The order was issued based upon his failure to appear in court. The scale of the pay-out for which he is liable was to be assessed at a later stage but was never published.

Covert Recording of MI5

Attempted Recruitment by MI5 Recorded

References

  1. ^ Keeley and Smithwick Tribunal, Bbc.com; accessed 5 May 2014.
  2. ^ “Former spy released without charge”Rte.ie. 6 November 2006. Retrieved 24 August 2017.
  3. Jump up to:a b Fulton, Kevin, Jim Nally, and Ian Gallagher. Unsung Hero, John Blake Publishing Ltd., London (2006); ISBN 978-1-84454-034-1, pp. 146-47.
  4. ^ BBC‘s Hard Talk interview, 4 October 2006.
  5. ^ “Informer’s ex-wife Margaret Keeley to battle MoD legal move”BelfastTelegraph.co.uk. Retrieved 24 August 2017.
  6. ^ “Stakeknife damaged my life – MI5 agent’s ex-wife”Bbc.co.uk. 23 March 2011. Retrieved 24 August 2017.
  7. ^ Suzanne McGonagle, Irish News wins legal battle regarding spy’s photo”, Scribd.com; accessed 4 May 2014.
  8. ^ Melaugh, Dr Martin. “CAIN: Issues: Victims of the Northern Ireland Conflict”Cain.ulst.ac.uk. Retrieved 24 August 2017.
  9. ^ “British agent in IRA must pay damage to victim’s family, says court order”Belfast Telegraph, 31 January 2014; accessed 4 May 2014.

Main source : Wikipedia Kevin Fulton

See: Peter Keeley Wikispooks

See: Books about the Troubles

See: Double Agent : My Secret Life Undercover in The IRA

See: IRA Nutting Squad

See: Belfast: Telegraph Former intelligence agent Kevin Fulton, who was born in Newry but now lives “somewhere in the UK”……

See Irish News: Secret file proves existence of IRA informer

Posts about the Troubles

1st July – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

 

 

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

1st July

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Wednesday 1 July 1970

Reginald Maudling, then Home Secretary, paid a visit to Northern Ireland.

As he boarded the flight out of Northern Ireland again he was reported to have said:

“For God’s sake bring me a large Scotch. What a bloody awful country!”.

The Criminal Justice (Temporary Provisions) Act was passed by the Stormont government introducing a mandatory prison sentence of six months for rioting.

Sunday 1 July 1973

 

William Whitelaw, then Secretary of State, travelled to Chequers for a meeting with at 8.00pm with Edward Heath, then British Prime Minster.

[Public Records 1972 – Released 1 January 2003: Note of meeting between William Whitelaw, then Secretary of State, and Edward Heath, then British Prime Minster. ]

.

Wednesday 1 July 1981

hungry strikes

See Hunger Strike

Thursday 1 July 1982

The Garda Síochána (the Irish police) found a large cache of bombs at Castlefin, County Donegal.

Wednesday 1 July 1992

         

Gregory Burns, John  Dignam & Aidan Starrs

The bodies of three Irish Republican Army (IRA) members were found in different parts of south Armagh.

The three men were shot dead by the IRA which alleged that the men had acted as informers for the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) and MI5 (British Security Service).

In a significant shift in approach the Unionist parties agreed to talks with politicians from the Republic of Ireland under Strand Two of the political talks (later known as the Brooke / Mayhew talks).

The Royal Irish Regiment (RIR) came into being. The regiment was formed by the amalgamation of the Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR) and the Royal Irish Rangers.

[The UDR had been the subject of sustained criticism from Nationalists since its formation in 1970. The merger meant that the former UDR battalions, a total of approximately 6,000 soldiers, would continue to operate in Northern Ireland while the two former Rangers battalions would be reduced to a single general service battalion, approximately 900 soldiers, that would serve abroad as well as in Northern Ireland.]

Thursday 1 July 1993

The annual report of the Standing Advisory Commission on Human Rights (SACHR) was published. SACHR called for a review of the legislation that covered the use of lethal force by the security forces.

The report also supported the use of video recording of Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) interviews of people suspected of paramilitary related offences.

Tuesday 1 July 1997

The offices of the Irish News were slightly damaged in an arson attack.

The Garvaghy Road Residents Coalition announced that they were organising a street festival for Sunday 6 July 1997.

This would coincide with the disputed Orange Parade.

Bertie Ahern, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), and his ministerial team held talks in Belfast with Marjorie (Mo) Mowlam, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, about the ‘marching season’. Ahern said that it would be a mistake to force the march along the Garvaghy Road.

The Northern Ireland Office (NIO) and the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) said that they would only announce their decision on whether or not the march could proceed along the Garvaghy Road, two or three days in advance.

This was in spite of a promise by Mowlam to reveal the decision at lease six days in advance.

Wednesday 1 July 1998

First Meeting of ‘Shadow’ Assembly ‘First Minister Designate’ and ‘Deputy First Minister Designate’ Elected

 

All the political parties who had won seats during the Northern Ireland Assembly election took their places in the new Assembly chamber at Stormont. The Assembly met in ‘shadow’ form as powers had not yet been devolved. Those present included the parties, and candidates, who had opposed the Good Friday Agreement.

 

[The event was televised live in Northern Ireland and many people found it almost surreal to see Ian Paisley, then leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), sitting in the same debating chamber as Gerry Adams, then President of Sinn Féin (SF).]

During the first session on the new Northern Ireland Assembly David Trimble, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), was elected ‘First Minister Designate’ of the new Assembly. Seamus Mallon, then deputy leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), was elected ‘Deputy First Minister Designate’.

 

John Alderdice, formerly the leader of the Alliance Party of Northern Ireland (APNI), was appointed as the ‘Presiding Officer Designate’ (the Speaker) of the new Assembly.

Thursday 1 July 1999

Tony Blair, then British Prime Minister, claimed that the Stormont talks had brought about a “seismic shift” in the political landscape of Northern Ireland.

The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) continued to insist that the Irish Republican Army (IRA) should decommission its weapons and explosives in parallel with the creation of the Northern Ireland Executive.

Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) sources believed a possible solution was emerging. (Blair’s attendance at the Stormont talks meant that he missed the opening of the Scottish Parliament.)

The Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) won a council by-election in Lisburn. Peter Robinson, then Deputy Leader of the DUP, said this victory in a Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) safe seat was a “final warning” to David Trimble  then leader of the UUP.

Those Loyalist paramilitary groups who were then on ceasefire issued a warning to “hooligans and looters” that pro-Drumcree rioting would not be tolerated.

drumcree church at night

See Drumcree Conflict

William Whitelaw, who had been appointed as the first Secretary of State for Northern Ireland following the imposition of Direct Rule in 1972, died in London aged 81.

Sunday 1 July 2001

Trimble Resigned As First Minister

The resignation of David Trimble, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), as First Minister took effect as of midnight on Saturday.

Trimble called on Tony Blair, then British Prime Minister, to suspend the Northern Ireland Assembly (NIA) and the other institutions established under the Good Friday agreement.

The procedures of the NIA allowed for a six-week period during which a new First Minister and Deputy First Minister would have to be elected otherwise new elections to the Assembly would have to be called.

Another option would be for the British government to suspend the Assembly and the institutions and reintroduce Direct Rule. The final option was for there to be a temporary suspension which would have the effect of extending the period in which to find agreement.

The Assembly was suspended for 24 hours beginning on Friday 10 August 2001.

 

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

10 People lost their lives on the 1st July between 1972 – 1992

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01 July 1972
Paul Jobling  (19)

nfNI
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
English visitor. Found shot on waste ground, Westway Drive, Glencairn, Belfast.

——————————————

01 July 1972
Daniel Hayes  (40)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Found shot in playground, Penrith Street, Shankill, Belfast.

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01 July 1973
Reginald Roberts   (25)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while on British Army (BA) foot patrol, Bull Ring, Ballymurphy, Belfast

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01 July 1976
Brian Palmer   (39)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot while in Finaghy Roadhouse Bar, Finaghy Road North, Belfast. Alleged informer.

——————————————

01 July 1980


Terence O’Neill   (26)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC)
Shot while running away from Whiterock Community Centre, Ballymurphy, Belfast.

——————————————

01 July 1986


Robert Hill  (22)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Killed by booby trap bomb attached to his car outside his home, Drumaness, near Ballynahinch, County Down.

——————————————

01 July 1989


Norman Annett   (56)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Shot while visiting his mother’s home, Carhill Road, Garvagh, County Derry

——————————————

01 July 1992


Gregory Burns   (34)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Found shot Cullaville Road, near Crossmaglen, County Armagh. Alleged informer.

——————————————

01 July 1992


John Dignam  (32)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Found shot at Mountain Road, Lislea, County Armagh. Alleged informer.

——————————————

01 July 1992


Aidan Starrs  (29)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA), K

illed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Found shot at Dundalk Road, near Newtownhamilton, County Armagh. Alleged informer.

——————————————

See: IRA Nutting Squad 

 

13th February – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

13th February

————————————-

Friday 13 February 1976

There were riots in Belfast and Derry following the news of the death of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) hunger-striker Frank Stagg in a prison in England on 12 February 1976.

Saturday 13 February 1988

Representatives of Sinn Féin (SF) endorsed the talks between John Hume, then leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), and Gerry Adams, then leader of Sinn Féin (SF).

Tuesday 13 February 1996

John Major, then British Prime Minister, met Ian Paisley, then leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), for talks at Downing Street, London.

Saturday 13 February 1999

The Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) released figures on the number of paramilitary ‘punishment’ attacks carried out by Republicans. There had been 18 attacks from 1 January 1999 to 2 February 1999 but no attacks since that date

Tuesday 13 February 2001

British Army (BA) technical experts have made safe a pipe-bomb in Belfast that had been picked up by a 4 year old girl and carried into her home. The target of the attack was a Catholic family living on the Springfield Road in the west of the city. The attack was carried out by Loyalist paramilitaries.

Wednesday 13 February 2002

Two men were charged in London with bombing offences during 2001.

The Metropolitan Police charged one man (33) with causing explosions outside the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) on 3 March 2001, in Ealing on 3 August 2001, and in Birmingham on 3 November 2001, and with a number of other offences. The second man (24) was charged with conspiracy to cause an explosion on or before 14 November 2001.

[The two men had been arrested separately in Northern Ireland on 6 and 9 February 2002. The men appeared at Belmarsh Magistrate’s Court on Thursday 14 February 2002.]

Jane kennedy, then Security Minister, announced in the House of Commons extra funding of £16 million for the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI). The additional funding takes the total figure to £656 million. Ian Paisley, then leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), said the extra funding was not enough for policing needs.

Tony Blair, then British Prime Minister, called on Sinn Féin (SF) to take note of the plight of ‘exiles’ – people who had been forced to leave Northern Ireland by paramilitaries. He said that a resolution of the issue was an important part of the peace process.

[The issue was debated in the House of Commons on Thursday 14 February 2002.]

 ———————————————————————

Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following  people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live  forever

– To  the Paramilitaries  –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

3 People   lost their lives on the 13th  February  between  1972 – 1984

  —————————————————————————

13 February 1972
Thomas McCann,  (19)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: non-specific Republican group (REP)
From Dublin. Off duty. Found shot, near Newtownbutler, County Fermanagh.

  —————————————————————————

13 February 1976
Sean Bailey,  (20)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died one day after being injured in premature bomb explosion in house, Nansen Street, Falls, Belfast.

  —————————————————————————

13 February 1984
 James Young,  (41)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Found shot, Blaney Road, near Crossmaglen, County Armagh. Alleged informer

  —————————————————————————

 

See: IRA Nutting Squad

8th September – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

8th September

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

Wednesday 8 September 1971

Harold Wilson, then leader of the Labour Party, announced details of a plan for a united Ireland.

Friday 8 September 1972

[Public Records 1972 – Released 1 January 2003: Memo from the Cabinet Secretary to Edward Heath, then British Prime Minister. This memo covered: the future of Northern Ireland; the Security Package; and changes in the administration of justice (most notably the introduction of special courts).]

Monday 8 September 1975

During a United Ulster Unionist Council (UUUC) meeting William Craig was the only member to vote for a voluntary coalition with the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP).

Sunday 8 September 1985

A married couple Gerard and Catherine Mahon, both Catholic civilians, were found shot dead in Turf Lodge in west Belfast. The couple had been shot by the Irish Republican Army (IRA) who alleged that they were informers working on behalf of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC).

Thursday 8 September 1994

The Combined Loyalist Military Command (CLMC) set out a list of issues that it wished to receive assurances on before it considered calling a ceasefire of Loyalist paramilitary groups. In particular the CLMC wanted convinced that the Irish Republican Army (IRA) ceasefire was permanent and that no secret deal had been done to achieve it. British Army soldiers wore berets instead of steel helmets while on patrol in Belfast.

[It was viewed as a symbolic gesture representing a relaxation of security measures.]

The Belfast Coroner abandoned the Inquest into the deaths of the six men at the centre of the alleged ‘shoot to kill’ incidents in November and December 1982. The reason given for the action was the decision of Hugh Annesley (Sir), then Chief Constable of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC), not to provide the Inquest with a copy of the Stalker report.

[The Belfast High Court had ruled against the Coroner on 11 July 1994 when the court said he could not have access to the contents of the Stalker report.]

Friday 8 September 1995

Trimble Elected Leader of UUP The Ulster Unionist Council (UUC) held a meeting to choose a new leader following the resignation of James Molyneaux on 28 August 1995. David Trimble, then UUP MP, won the contest on the third count beating John Taylor, then UUP MP, who had been considered the favourite to win. Trimble won by 466 to 333 votes.

Sunday 8 September 1996

An Orange parade in Dunloy, County Antrim was rerouted by the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC). In protest at this decision the Orangemen held a short stand-off at a police line.

Monday 8 September 1997

Mary Robinson, then President of the Republic of Ireland, paid her final visit before retiring to Northern Ireland. Robinson attended a meeting of the Council for Ethnic Minorities and also addressed a special meeting of community and voluntary sector groups at Balmoral, Belfast.

[Previous visits by the President had been criticised by Unionist politicians particularly when she shook hands with Gerry Adams, then President of Sinn Féin (SF), in 1993.]

John Hume, then leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), announced that he would not be standing in the forthcoming Presidential election in the Republic of Ireland. Hume said that he felt a duty to stay with the SDLP at the “crucial stage” of the peace process.

Saturday 8 September 2001

A Catholic primary school Newington Avenue in north Belfast was damaged in an arson attack.


Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the follow  people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To  the Paramilitaries  –

“There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

6 People lost their lives on the 8th September  between 1969 – 1985

————————————————————–

08 September 1969
John Todd,  (29)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Republican group (REP)
Shot during street disturbances, Alloa Street, Lower Oldpark, Belfast.

————————————————————–

08 September 1974
Arthur Rafferty,   (56)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died three weeks after being shot in Newington Street, New Lodge, Belfast.

————————————————————–

08 September 1975
Andrew Craig,  (20)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Association (UDA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Found shot at corner of Alfred Street and Russell Street, Markets, Belfast.

————————————————————–

08 September 1977
Hugh Rogers,  (50)

Catholic
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Shot outside his home, Orchardville Crescent, Finaghy, Belfast.

————————————————————–

08 September 1985


Gerard Mahon,  (28)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Found shot, together with his wife, in entry off Norglen Crescent, Turf Lodge, Belfast. Alleged informer.

————————————————————–

08 September 1985


Catherine Mahon,  (26)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Found shot, together with her husband, in entry off Norglen Crescent, Turf Lodge, Belfast. Alleged informer.


Main source CAIN Web Service

Major Events in the Troubles

See: IRA Internal Security Unit – Nutting Squad

See: 9th September