Tag Archives: Patrick Murphy

16th November – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

16th November

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Saturday 16 November 1968

The Derry Citizens Action Committee (DCAC) defied a ban on marches in Derry by marching to the Diamond area of the city. An estimated 15,000 people took part in the subsequent sit-down demonstration in the Diamond area of Derry.

Tuesday 16 November 1971

Compton Report Published The report of the Compton inquiry was published. Report of the enquiry into allegations against the security forces of physical brutality in Northern Ireland arising out of events on the 9th August, 1971. (November 1971; Cmnd. 4832). The report acknowledged that there had been ill-treatment of internees (what was termed ‘in-depth interrogation’) but rejected claims of systematic brutality or torture.

Thursday 16 November 1972

Edward Heath, then British Prime Minister, warned against a Unilateral Declaration of Independence (UDI).

Friday 16 November 1973 [

Public Records 1972 – Released 1 January 2003: Letter, and annexes, about ‘Operation Folklore’ from Mr A.W.Stephens, then Head of Defence Secretariat 10, to Mr V.H.S.Benham, an official at the Northern Ireland Office (NIO) in London. The letter discussed the possibility of British soldiers being able to open fire in Northern Ireland without fear of legal penality.]

  1. There was a Loyalist ‘Third Force’ rally in Enniskillen, County Fermanagh. The rally was addressed by Ian Paisley, then leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), who said that Unionists would make Northern Ireland ungovernable. Three Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) Members of Parliament were suspended from parliament when they protested about the British government’s policy on security in Northern Ireland.

Tuesday 16 November 1982

See Lenny Murphy

See Shankill Butchers

Lenny Murphy

Lenny Murphy (29), who had been leader of the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) gang the ‘Shankill Butchers’, was shot dead by Irish Republican Army (IRA) at Forthriver Park, Glencairn, Belfast.

[It was later claimed that Loyalist paramilitaries had colluded with the IRA in having Murphy shot because no group was able to control him. Murphy’s gang had been responsible for a series of particularly brutal murders of Catholic civilians. Many of those killed were first abducted, then beaten and tortured with butcher knives and hatchets before being killed and their bodies dumped.]

A Catholic civilian was shot dead by Loyalists in Mount Merrion Avenue, Rosetta, Belfast.

Two reserve members of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) were shot dead by the Irish National Liberation Army (INLA) at a security barrier in Markethill, County Armagh.

Saturday 16 November 1985

The Northern Ireland Assembly voted by 44 votes to 10 for a motion calling for a referendum to be held on the Anglo-Irish Agreement (AIA). Unionists also announced that on 17 December 1985 all 15 Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) and Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) Members of Parliament (MPs) would resign their seats and so cause by-elections in most of the parliamentary constituencies in Northern Ireland. Unionists also said they would withdraw from all advisory boards in Northern Ireland and refuse to meet with government ministers.

Friday 16 November 1990

Margaret Thatcher, then British Prime Minister, visited Northern Ireland.

Monday 16 November 1992

A meeting of the Anglo-Irish Intergovernmental Conference (AIIC) in Dublin reviewed the procedures used in the political talks (later known as the Brooke / Mayhew talks) and favoured bilateral talks.

Sunday 16 November 1997

Colin Duffy, then a prominent Republican based in Lurgan, was charged with assault following a fracas involving Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) officers in the town. [There were riots in Lurgan and Armagh on 18 November 1997 following his arrest.]

Tuesday 16 November 1999

The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) issued a keynote statement and Sinn Féin (SF) issued a separate keynote statement committing both parties to the full implementation of the Good Friday Agreement. David Trimble, then leader of the UUP, recognised the legitimate aspirations of Nationalists to pursue a united Ireland and embraced the principles of inclusivity, equality and mutual respect.

Gerry Adams, then President of Sinn Féin (SF), spoke of working with, not against, Unionists in the future. The other main political parties in Northern Ireland all issued statements endorsing the Good Friday Agreement.

The Interdepartmental Committee on Immigration and Asylum, which was drawing up proposals for the dispersal of asylum-seekers outside Dublin, received a proposal by the Department of Defence to accommodate asylum-seekers in disused Army barracks around the State.

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following  people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live  forever

– To  the Paramilitaries  –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

13  People lost their lives on the 16th November between 1970 – 1987

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16 November 1970


Arthur McKenna,   (35)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot while repairing car, Ballymurphy Road, Ballymurphy, Belfast. Alleged criminal.

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16 November 1970


Alexander McVicker,   (35)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot while repairing car, Ballymurphy Road, Ballymurphy, Belfast. Alleged criminal

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16 November 1972


Joseph Calvin,  (42)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Killed by booby trap bomb attached to his car, in car park, Quay Lane, Enniskillen, County Fermanagh.

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16 November 1974
Thomas McCready,   (32)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while on Ulster Defence Regiment mobile patrol, Newry, County Down.

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16 November 1975


Joseph Clements,   (48)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in land mine attack on Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) mobile patrol, near Sixmilecross, County Tyrone.

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16 November 1976
James Duffy,  (48)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: not known (nk)
Shot while delivering meat to butcher’s shop, at the junction of Falls Road and Rockmount Street, Belfast.

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16 November 1978


 Wesley Orr,   (53)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Fire officer. Killed when grenade exploded while fighting fire caused by incendiary device, Bass Brewery, Glen Road, Andersonstown, Belfast.

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16 November 1982
Patrick Murphy,  (63)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Shot at his shop, Mount Merrion Avenue, Rosetta, Belfast.

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16 November 1982


Ronald Irwin,  (24)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish National Liberation Army (INLA)
Shot while at security barrier, Markethill, County Armagh.

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16 November 1982


Snowdon Corkey,   (41)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish National Liberation Army (INLA)
Shot while at security barrier, Markethill, County Armagh.

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16 November 1982


Lennie Murphy,   (29)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot outside his girlfriend’s home, Forthriver Park, Glencairn, Belfast.

See  Lenny Murphy

See Shankill Butchers

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16 November 1984
Patrick Brady,  (36)

Catholic
Status: Civilian Political Activist (CivPA),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Sinn Fein (SF) member. Shot at his workplace, a dairy, Boucher Road, Belfast.

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16 November 1987


Thomas McAuley,  (32)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Died five days after being shot at his cafe, Crumlin Road, Ardoyne, Belfast.

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22nd August – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

22nd  August

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

Sunday 22 August 1971

Approximately 130 non-Unionist councillors announced their withdrawal from participation on district councils across Northern Ireland in protest against Internment.

Tuesday 22 August 1972 Newry Bomb

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A bomb that was being planted by the Irish Republican Army (IRA) exploded prematurely at a customs post at Newry, County Down. Nine people, including three members of the IRA and five Catholic civilians, were killed in the explosion.

Friday 22 August 1975

Three Catholic civilians were killed in a gun and bomb attack on McGleenan’s Bar, Upper English Street, Armagh. The attack was carried out by Loyalist paramilitaries. A Catholic civilian died six days after being shot by Loyalists in Belfast.

Wednesday 22 August 1979

Humphrey Atkins, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, rejected a proposal that Hugh Carey, then Governor of New York, should chair talks in New York between Atkins and Michael O’Kennedy, then Irish Foreign Minister.

Wednesday 22 August 1984

Gerry Curran, then Armagh coroner, resigned after discovering “grave irregularities” in Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) files related to the killing of two Irish National Liberation Army (INLA) members on 12 December 1982.

September 1984

Friday 22 August 1986

John Stalker, then Deputy Chief Constable of the Greater Manchester Police, was cleared of all allegations of misconduct and reinstated in his police position. However, Stalker was not returned to the inquiry into the ‘shoot to kill’ allegations in Northern Ireland. The Shorts aircraft company in Belfast ordered that all flags and emblems displayed by workers should be removed. The company had received complaints of intimidation against Catholics.

[The decision led to the walk-out of 1,000 employees on 27 August 1986. A letter issued later by senior management stated that the Union Jack flag would be flown from the company’s flagstaff at all times.]

Tuesday 22 August 1995

The Irish News (a Belfast based newspaper) published the results of an opinion poll on issues related to all-party talks. Of those who responded, 52 per cent supported the setting of a date for all-party talks whether or not weapons had been decommissioned.

Saturday 22 August 1998 INLA Ceasefire

The Irish National Liberation Army (INLA) announced that it was to go on ceasefire as from midday. [In terms of size the INLA was the second largest of the Republican paramilitary organisations. There were calls for the Continuity Irish Republican Army (CIRA) to also announce a ceasefire.] The Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) announced that it intended to establish a trust fund for the victims of the Omagh bombing.

Sunday 22 August 1999

David Trimble, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), said the UUP was correct not to form a power-sharing government on 15 July 1999 in light of the subsequent killing of a Belfast taxi driver, Charles Bennett, and the uncovering of a Florida-based gun-smuggling operation.

Tuesday 22 August 2000

Johnny Adair, then a leader of the Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF), a cover name (pseudonym) used by the Ulster Defence Association (UDA), was arrested and returned to prison by the order of Peter Mandelson, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland. The arrest was an attempt to calm the atmosphere following the escalation in the Loyalist paramilitary feud. Adair had been released early on licence under the terms of the Good Friday Agreement and was returned to prison because he was believed to have taken part “in the commission, preparation or instigation of acts of terrorism”.

Wednesday 22 August 2001

There were a series of bomb alerts around Northern Ireland. Approximately 30 elderly people had to be moved from their homes in Armagh after a suspicious object was found under a van. A suspected ‘pipe bomb’ was found in the letter box at the constituency office of Martin McGuinness, then Member of Parliament (MP) for Mid-Ulster.

Approximately 40 buildings on Burn Road, Cookstown, County Tyrone, were evacuated to allow British Army technical officers to deal with the device. The Red Hand Defenders (RHD), a cover name previously used by the Ulster Defence Association (UDA), claimed responsibility for both these attacks.

Loyalist paramilitaries left a pipe-bomb outside the Boleran Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) club in Garvagh, County Derry. There was another pipe-bomb attack on Gulladuff GAA club, near Maghera, County Derry. The Foyle Bridge in Derry had to be closed after a claim that a bomb had been left nearby. The train line under the bridge was also closed disrupting services between Derry and Belfast. Later in the day the Craigavon Bridge was also closed during the evening rush hour. This brought traffic in the centre of the city to a standstill and effectively cut off the Cityside from the Waterside. People were faced with a 30 mile detour via the next bridge at Strabane, County Tyrone.

[Both alerts were thought to have been caused by warnings from the “real” Irish Republican Army (rIRA).]

Colombian authorities announced that the three Irishmen arrested on 13 August 2001 would be held while a criminal investigation was undertaken. The three men face charges of allegedly training Marxist rebels and carrying false passports. Liam Kennendy (Dr.), then Professor of Modern History at Queen’s University of Belfast, published his findings on paramilitary ‘punishment’ attacks in a report entitled They Shoot Children Don’t They.

One of the findings of the report was that between 1990 and 2000, 372 teenagers had been beaten and 207 shot by Loyalist and Republican paramilitary groups in what is commonly termed ‘punishment’ attacks. The report showed that during 1999 and 2000 there were 47 ‘punishment’ attacks on under 18 year olds compared with 25 in the previous two years. The report was prepared for the Northern Ireland Committee Against Terrorism and the Northern Ireland Affairs Committee of the House of Commons. The report will also be submitted to the Northern Ireland Assembly.


Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the follow  people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To  the Paramilitaries  –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

17 people lost their lives on the 22nd  August between 1972 – 1998

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22 August 1972
James Johnston,  (40)

Protestant
Status: Civilian Political Activist (CivPA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Member of Loyalist Association of Workers. Found shot in abandoned van, Turin Street, off Grosvenor Road, Belfast.

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22 August 1972

Oliver Rowntree,   (22)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died in premature bomb explosion at Customs Office, Newry, County Down.

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22 August 1972

Noel Madden,  (18)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died in premature bomb explosion at Customs Office, Newry, County Down.

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22 August 1972

Patrick Hughes,  (35)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died in premature bomb explosion at Customs Office, Newry, County Down.

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22 August 1972

 Francis Quinn,  (28)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died in premature bomb explosion at Customs Office, Newry, County Down.

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22 August 1972
Patrick Murphy,  (45)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died in premature bomb explosion at Customs Office, Newry, County Down.

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22 August 1972
Craig Lawrence,  (33)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died in premature bomb explosion at Customs Office, Newry, County Down.

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22 August 1972
Michael Gilleece,  (32)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died in premature bomb explosion at Customs Office, Newry, County Down

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22 August 1972
Joseph Fegan,   (28)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died in premature bomb explosion at Customs Office, Newry

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22 August 1972
John McCann,  (60)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died in premature bomb explosion at Customs Office, Newry, County Down.

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22 August 1975
William Daniel,  (27)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Died six days after being shot while sitting in his car outside his girlfriend’s home, Glenbank Place, off Crumlin Road, Belfast.

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22 August 1975
John McGleenan  (45)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Killed in gun and bomb attack on McGleenan’s Bar, Upper English Street, Armagh

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22 August 1975
Patrick Hughes,  (30)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Killed in gun and bomb attack on McGleenan’s Bar, Upper English Street, Armagh.

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22 August 1975
Thomas Morris,   (22)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Injured in gun and bomb attack on McGleenan’s Bar, Upper English Street, Armagh. He died 28 August 1975.

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22 August 1977
Martin, William (60)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Abducted from his home, St. Joseph’s Place, Crossmaglen, County Armagh. Found shot a short time later, Moybane, near Crossmaglen, County Armagh. Alleged informer.

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22 August 1985
Daniel Mallon,  (65)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot while in Railway Bar, Strabane, County Tyrone. Mistaken for contractor to British Army (BA) / Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC).

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22 August 1988
Alan Shields,  (45) nfNI
Status: Royal Navy (RN),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Originally from Scotland. Royal Navy recruiting officer. Killed when detonated booby trap bomb attached to his car while travelling along Middlepath Street, Belfast.

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21st August – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

 

21st   August

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

Friday 21 August 1970 SDLP Formed

The Social and Democratic Labour Party (SDLP) was established. The first leader of the party was Gerry Fitt and the deputy leader John Hume. Other prominent members included, Paddy Devlin, Austin Currie, Ivan Cooper, Paddy O’Hanlon and Paddy Wilson. [The party effectively took over from most of the various Nationalist and Labour party groupings and became the main political voice of Nationalists in Northern Ireland until Sinn Fein began to contest elections in the early 1980s.]

Saturday 21 August 1976

Approximately 20,000 people, mainly women from Protestant and Catholic areas of Belfast, attended a Peace People’s rally at Ormeau Park, Belfast.

Wednesday 21 August 1991

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) exploded a large bomb, estimated at 500 pounds, near an Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) station in Kilrea, County Derry. The explosion causes damage to nearby homes and churches.

Gerry Adams, then President of Sinn Féin (SF), wrote a letter, seeking ‘open-ended discussions’, to the British and Irish governments and to political and Church leaders in Northern Ireland.

Friday 21 August 1992

Hugh McKibben (21), then a member of the Irish People’s Liberation Organisation (IPLO), was shot dead at the Lámh Dhearg Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) social club on the outskirts of Belfast. His was killed by the Belfast Brigade of the IPLO during an internal IPLO feud. Two other men were wounded in the attack.

Saturday 21 August 1999

The remains of Tom Williams were exhumed from Crumlin Road Prison and handed over to his surviving family members. Williams had been a member of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) and was hanged in 1942 for the killing of Patrick Murphy a Constable in the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC).

Monday 21 August 2000 Loyalist Paramilitary Feud

Two men, Jackie Coulter and Bobby Mahood, were killed as the Loyalist paramilitary feud erupted into further violence. Coulter, who had Ulster Defence Association (UDA) connections and was an associate of Johnny Adair, died immediately at the scene. Mahood, who had been seriously wounded, died later in hospital.

Flag_of_the_Ulster_Defence_Association_svg

Loyalist sources said that Mahood had Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) connections but he opposed the Belfast Agreement and the policies of the Progressive Unionist Party (PUP). The killings were carried out by the UVF and were part of a feud between the UDA and the UVF.

U.V.F Logo
U.V.F Logo

In addition to the shootings there were also attacks on offices used by the two Loyalist parties closely associated with the UDA and the UVF. Troops were deployed on the streets of Belfast to try to control the situation.

[Seven people were killed during the feud which officially ended on 15 December 2000.]

Tuesday 21 August 2001

Two pipe-bombs were thrown at two separate houses at Inchcolme Avenue, Ballymena, County Antrim, at about 12.30am (0030BST). The front door of one house was damaged and a window broken in the other house. There were no injuries in the two attacks.

[The RUC have not established a motive for the attacks.]

The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) announced that it required more time to respond to the ‘Patten Report – Updated Implementation Plan 2001’ (issued on 17 August 2001). James Cooper, then Chairman of the UUP, said that:

“While we are not opposed in principle to nominations to the police board, we still have a number of concerns.”

The Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) also missed the British government’s deadline of midday in which to respond to the policing proposals.

[The DUP were critical of the new implementation plan and were expected to make a detailed response at a later date.]

John Reid, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, said that he believed that the new Police Board would be operational at the end of September 2001. Nigel Baylor (Rev), then Church of Ireland rector, criticised as “insulting” the Ulster Defence Association (UDA) parade and ‘show of strength’ on the Shankill Road in Belfast on Saturday 19 August 2001.

Baylor had led the service at the funeral of Gavin Brett (18), who had been shot dead by Loyalist paramilitaries on 29 July 2001.

[Although the Red Hand Defenders (RHD) had claimed responsibility for the killing most people blamed the UDA.]

The Guardian (a British newspaper) carried a report  on the results of an opinion poll on the future of Northern Ireland carried out by ICM in Britain. Of those questioned, 41 per cent stated that they thought there should be a united Ireland. Only 26 per cent felt that Northern Ireland should remain part of the United Kingdom (UK). The report stated: “For unionists, many of whom consider themselves British and refer to Britain as ‘the mainland’, today’s findings amount to a cold shoulder from their fellow citizens. Only one in four wants the province to stay part of the country.”

[This survey maked a significant shift in public opinion in Britain from the 1980s and 1990s when there was a majority in favour of Northern Ireland remaining within the UK.]

William Esson, then a reserve judge with the Bloody Sunday Inquiry, announced that he was resigning from the inquiry for reasons of ill health.


Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the follow  people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To  the Paramilitaries  –

“There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

6 people lost their lives on the 21st  August between 1975 – 2000

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21 August 1975


John Finlay,   (30)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Shot while walking to work along Brougham Street, Belfast.

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21 August 1975
David Davidson,   (30)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Republican group (REP)
Shot at his workplace, scrapyard / garage, Antrim Road, Ballyvessy, near Glengormley, County Antrim.

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21 August 1978


Patrick Fee,  (64)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while travelling to work in his firm’s van, Scribbagh, near Garrison, County Fermanagh. The van driver, an off duty Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR) member, the intended target.

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21 August 1992


Isobel Leyland,  (40)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot during sniper attack on nearby Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) mobile patrol, while walking at the junction of Ardoyne Avenue and Flax Street, Ardoyne, Belfast

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21 August 2000


Jackie Coulter,   (46)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Association (UDA),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot while sitting in stationary jeep, Crumlin Road, Belfast. Ulster Defence Association (UDA) / Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) feud.

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21 August 2000


Bobby Mahood,  (48)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot while sitting with UDA member Jackie Coulter, in stationary jeep, Crumlin Road, Belfast. Ulster Defence Association (UDA) / Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) feud.

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