10th May – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

10th May

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Saturday 10 May 1969

In an interview with the Belfast Telegraph Terence O’Neill, the former Northern Ireland Prime Minister, is reported as saying that: “… if you give Roman Catholics a good job and a good house, they will live like Protestants, … They will refuse to have 18 children.”

Wednesday 10 May 1972

An Irish Republican Army (IRA) bomb started a fire that destroyed the Belfast Co-operative store.

Friday 10 May 1974

 

Two Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) officers were shot dead by the Irish Republican Army (IRA) in an attack on Finaghy Road North, Finaghy, Belfast.

The Ulster Workers’ Council (UWC) issues a statement calling for new elections to the Northern Ireland Assembly.

Tuesday 10 May 1977

Day 8 of the UUAC Strike

Harry Bradshaw (46), a Protestant civilian, was shot dead by Loyalist paramilitaries as he drove a bus on the Crumlin Road, Belfast. He was killed because he was working during the United Unionist Action Council (UUAC) strike.

John Geddis (26), a member of the Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR), was killed in a Loyalist bomb attack on a petrol station on the Crumlin Road, Belfast. Again this attack was carried out because the petrol station had opened during the strike.

Two members of the Ulster Defence Association (UDA) were killed as the result of a premature explosion of an incendiary bomb they were working on at a derelict house in Monkstown, Newtownabbey, County Antrim.

At a roadblock outside Ballymena Ian Paisley, Ernest Baird, and other members of the UUAC were arrested. Paisley was charged with obstruction of the highway and then released. In Toomebridge, County Antrim a roadblock by farmers supporting the UUAC was attacked by local nationalists.

In the disturbances that followed farm vehicles were pushed into the River Bann as the blockade was dispersed. It was reported that a number of shots were also fired during the disturbances

Thursday 10 May 1979

In the United States of America (USA) a judge ruled that a group of men, believed to be members of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) and also considered to be responsible for bombing the Ripon Barracks in North Yorkshire, should not be extradited to Britain.

Monday 10 May 1982

In a Commons debate on the Northern Ireland Bill, which set out proposals for a new Assembly at Stormont, James Prior, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, said:

“A policy of continuing with Direct Rule does not offer a long-term answer. We either move to a position of total integration … or we seek a gradual devolution of power …”.

Charles Haughey, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), appointed Seamus Mallon, then Deputy Leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), to the Irish Senate. He also appointed John Robb of the New Ireland Group to the Senate.

Tuesday 10 May 1983

The Northern Ireland Assembly began what was to become an all-night sitting to discuss devolution of powers from Westminster to the Assembly. Despite lengthy talks the parties were unable to agree a common approach.

Monday 10 May 1993

Patrick Mayhew, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, promised proposals for new political talks.

Wednesday 10 May 1995

SF Meeting With NIO Minister

Martin McGuinness, then Vice-President of Sinn Féin (SF), led a SF delegation to Stormont for a meeting with Michael Ancram, then Political Development Minister at the Northern Ireland Office (NIO).

[This was the first official meeting between SF and the British Government in 23 years. Ancram sought movement on the decommissioning of paramilitary weapons. SF pressed for the release of paramilitary prisoners, the disbandment of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC), and direct talks with the Secretary of State.]

Friday 10 May 1996

Following protests Ian Paisley, then leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), was told that his name would be added to his party’s name in the forth-coming elections.

Sunday 10 May 1998

SF End Abstentions At the party’s Ard Fheis in Dublin, Sinn Fein (SF) members voted to change their constitution to allow candidates to take their places in the proposed new Northern Ireland Assembly. Out of the 350 delegates present and eligible to vote, 331 voted in favour of a motion drafted by the Ard Comhairle (the ruling executive of SF) which would allow successful SF candidates to take up their seats in the new Northern Ireland Assembly. The party was addressed by Gerry Adams, then President of SF.

[The removal of the policy of ‘abstentionism’ was a historical move which ended 77 years of refusing to participate in institutions of government in Northern Ireland.]

A number of Irish Republican Army (IRA) prisoners were released from jails in the Republic of Ireland to attend the Ard Fheis. However, the scene of celebration that greeted the appearance of members of the ‘Balcombe Street Siege gang’ resulted in controversy and criticism from a wide circle of opinion. It was reported in the Sunday Tribune (a Republic of Ireland newspaper) that the membership of the “real” Irish Republican Army (rIRA) had grown to around 150 members. It was also claimed that the dissident group was being led by the former Quartermaster General of the IRA.

Monday 10 May 1999

John Hermon (Sir), former Chief Constable of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC), was quoted in The Daily Telegraph (a London based newspaper) as saying that Pat Finucane, a Belfast solicitor killed on 12 February 1989, was “associated with the IRA”. [Hermon’s remarks were criticised by Nationalists and human rights groups.]

Wednesday 10 May 2000

Gerry Loughran was appointed as the head of the Civil Service in Northern Ireland. He was the first Catholic to serve in the post.

 

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

 11 People lost their lives on the 10th  May  between 1973 – 1988

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10 May 1973


Franklin Caddoo   (24)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Shot at his farm, Rehaghy, near Aughnacloy, County Tyrone

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10 May 1973
Anthony Ahern   (18)

nfNI
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA), K

illed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
From County Cork. Killed in premature explosion while preparing land mine, Mullanahinch, near Rosslea, County Fermanagh.

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10 May 1974


John Ross  (40)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot while on Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) foot patrol, Finaghy Road North, Finaghy, Belfast

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10 May 1974


Brian Bell   (29)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot while on Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) foot patrol, Finaghy Road North, Finaghy, Belfast

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10 May 1975


Paul Gray   (20)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while on Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) foot patrol, Waterloo Street, Derry

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10 May 1977


Harry Bradshaw  (46)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Defence Association (UDA)
Bus driver. Shot when stopped to pick up passengers, Crumlin Road, Belfast. Working during Loyalist strike.

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10 May 1977


John Geddis  (26)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Off duty. Killed in car bomb attack on petrol station, Crumlin Road, Belfast. Petrol station had remained open during Loyalist strike.

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10 May 1977
William Hobbs   (44)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Association (UDA), Killed by: Ulster Defence Association (UDA)
Killed in premature explosion of incendiary bomb at derelict house, Seagoe Gardens, Monkstown, Newtownabbey, County Antrim.

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10 May 1977
James McClurg   (25)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Association (UDA),

Killed by: Ulster Defence Association (UDA)
Injured in premature explosion of incendiary bomb at derelict house, Seagoe Gardens, Monkstown, Newtownabbey, County Antrim. He died 7 June 1977

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10 May 1983


Alice Purves,  (47)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot during gun attack on her husband, an off duty British Army (BA) member, at her mother’s home, Strabane Old Road, Gobnascale, Derry.

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10 May 1988


Terence McDaid,  (31)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot at his home, Newington Street, New Lodge, Belfast.

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