Tag Archives: Paul Gray,

10th May – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

10th May

———————————

Saturday 10 May 1969

In an interview with the Belfast Telegraph Terence O’Neill, the former Northern Ireland Prime Minister, is reported as saying that: “… if you give Roman Catholics a good job and a good house, they will live like Protestants, … They will refuse to have 18 children.”

Wednesday 10 May 1972

An Irish Republican Army (IRA) bomb started a fire that destroyed the Belfast Co-operative store.

Friday 10 May 1974

 

Two Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) officers were shot dead by the Irish Republican Army (IRA) in an attack on Finaghy Road North, Finaghy, Belfast.

The Ulster Workers’ Council (UWC) issues a statement calling for new elections to the Northern Ireland Assembly.

Tuesday 10 May 1977

Day 8 of the UUAC Strike

Harry Bradshaw (46), a Protestant civilian, was shot dead by Loyalist paramilitaries as he drove a bus on the Crumlin Road, Belfast. He was killed because he was working during the United Unionist Action Council (UUAC) strike.

John Geddis (26), a member of the Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR), was killed in a Loyalist bomb attack on a petrol station on the Crumlin Road, Belfast. Again this attack was carried out because the petrol station had opened during the strike.

Two members of the Ulster Defence Association (UDA) were killed as the result of a premature explosion of an incendiary bomb they were working on at a derelict house in Monkstown, Newtownabbey, County Antrim.

At a roadblock outside Ballymena Ian Paisley, Ernest Baird, and other members of the UUAC were arrested. Paisley was charged with obstruction of the highway and then released. In Toomebridge, County Antrim a roadblock by farmers supporting the UUAC was attacked by local nationalists.

In the disturbances that followed farm vehicles were pushed into the River Bann as the blockade was dispersed. It was reported that a number of shots were also fired during the disturbances

Thursday 10 May 1979

In the United States of America (USA) a judge ruled that a group of men, believed to be members of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) and also considered to be responsible for bombing the Ripon Barracks in North Yorkshire, should not be extradited to Britain.

Monday 10 May 1982

In a Commons debate on the Northern Ireland Bill, which set out proposals for a new Assembly at Stormont, James Prior, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, said:

“A policy of continuing with Direct Rule does not offer a long-term answer. We either move to a position of total integration … or we seek a gradual devolution of power …”.

Charles Haughey, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), appointed Seamus Mallon, then Deputy Leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), to the Irish Senate. He also appointed John Robb of the New Ireland Group to the Senate.

Tuesday 10 May 1983

The Northern Ireland Assembly began what was to become an all-night sitting to discuss devolution of powers from Westminster to the Assembly. Despite lengthy talks the parties were unable to agree a common approach.

Monday 10 May 1993

Patrick Mayhew, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, promised proposals for new political talks.

Wednesday 10 May 1995

SF Meeting With NIO Minister

Martin McGuinness, then Vice-President of Sinn Féin (SF), led a SF delegation to Stormont for a meeting with Michael Ancram, then Political Development Minister at the Northern Ireland Office (NIO).

[This was the first official meeting between SF and the British Government in 23 years. Ancram sought movement on the decommissioning of paramilitary weapons. SF pressed for the release of paramilitary prisoners, the disbandment of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC), and direct talks with the Secretary of State.]

Friday 10 May 1996

Following protests Ian Paisley, then leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), was told that his name would be added to his party’s name in the forth-coming elections.

Sunday 10 May 1998

SF End Abstentions At the party’s Ard Fheis in Dublin, Sinn Fein (SF) members voted to change their constitution to allow candidates to take their places in the proposed new Northern Ireland Assembly. Out of the 350 delegates present and eligible to vote, 331 voted in favour of a motion drafted by the Ard Comhairle (the ruling executive of SF) which would allow successful SF candidates to take up their seats in the new Northern Ireland Assembly. The party was addressed by Gerry Adams, then President of SF.

[The removal of the policy of ‘abstentionism’ was a historical move which ended 77 years of refusing to participate in institutions of government in Northern Ireland.]

A number of Irish Republican Army (IRA) prisoners were released from jails in the Republic of Ireland to attend the Ard Fheis. However, the scene of celebration that greeted the appearance of members of the ‘Balcombe Street Siege gang’ resulted in controversy and criticism from a wide circle of opinion. It was reported in the Sunday Tribune (a Republic of Ireland newspaper) that the membership of the “real” Irish Republican Army (rIRA) had grown to around 150 members. It was also claimed that the dissident group was being led by the former Quartermaster General of the IRA.

Monday 10 May 1999

John Hermon (Sir), former Chief Constable of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC), was quoted in The Daily Telegraph (a London based newspaper) as saying that Pat Finucane, a Belfast solicitor killed on 12 February 1989, was “associated with the IRA”. [Hermon’s remarks were criticised by Nationalists and human rights groups.]

Wednesday 10 May 2000

Gerry Loughran was appointed as the head of the Civil Service in Northern Ireland. He was the first Catholic to serve in the post.

 

———————————————

Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

 11 People lost their lives on the 10th  May  between 1973 – 1988

———————————————–

10 May 1973


Franklin Caddoo   (24)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Shot at his farm, Rehaghy, near Aughnacloy, County Tyrone

———————————————–

10 May 1973
Anthony Ahern   (18)

nfNI
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA), K

illed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
From County Cork. Killed in premature explosion while preparing land mine, Mullanahinch, near Rosslea, County Fermanagh.

———————————————–

10 May 1974


John Ross  (40)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot while on Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) foot patrol, Finaghy Road North, Finaghy, Belfast

———————————————–

10 May 1974


Brian Bell   (29)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot while on Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) foot patrol, Finaghy Road North, Finaghy, Belfast

———————————————–

10 May 1975


Paul Gray   (20)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while on Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) foot patrol, Waterloo Street, Derry

———————————————–

10 May 1977


Harry Bradshaw  (46)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Defence Association (UDA)
Bus driver. Shot when stopped to pick up passengers, Crumlin Road, Belfast. Working during Loyalist strike.

———————————————–

10 May 1977


John Geddis  (26)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Off duty. Killed in car bomb attack on petrol station, Crumlin Road, Belfast. Petrol station had remained open during Loyalist strike.

———————————————–

10 May 1977
William Hobbs   (44)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Association (UDA), Killed by: Ulster Defence Association (UDA)
Killed in premature explosion of incendiary bomb at derelict house, Seagoe Gardens, Monkstown, Newtownabbey, County Antrim.

———————————————–

10 May 1977
James McClurg   (25)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Association (UDA),

Killed by: Ulster Defence Association (UDA)
Injured in premature explosion of incendiary bomb at derelict house, Seagoe Gardens, Monkstown, Newtownabbey, County Antrim. He died 7 June 1977

———————————————–

10 May 1983


Alice Purves,  (47)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot during gun attack on her husband, an off duty British Army (BA) member, at her mother’s home, Strabane Old Road, Gobnascale, Derry.

———————————————–

10 May 1988


Terence McDaid,  (31)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot at his home, Newington Street, New Lodge, Belfast.

———————————————–

 

Advertisements

Bessbrook bomb kills four RUC men- 17th April 1979

Bessbrook

Booby Trap Van Bomb

17th April 1979

Four Protestant members of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC), were killed by a Provisional IRA remote-controlled bomb hidden in a parked van, and detonated when their mobile patrol drove past, Bessbrook.

The bomb was estimated at 1,000 pound and was believed to be the largest bomb used by the IRA up to that date.

———————————————–

Victims

———————————————–

17 April 1979


Paul Gray, (25)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by remote controlled bomb hidden in parked van, detonated when Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) mobile patrol drove past, Bessbrook, County Armagh.

See 17th April Deaths & Events

———————————————–

17 April 1979


Robert Lockhart,  (44)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by remote controlled bomb hidden in parked van, detonated when Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) mobile patrol drove past, Bessbrook, County Armagh

See 17th April Deaths & Events

———————————————–

17 April 1979


Richard Baird,  (28)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by remote controlled bomb hidden in parked van, detonated when Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) mobile patrol drove past, Bessbrook, County Armagh

See 17th April Deaths & Events

———————————————–

17 April 1979


Noel Webb,  (30)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by remote controlled bomb hidden in parked van, detonated when Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) mobile patrol drove past, Bessbrook, County Armagh

See 17th April Deaths & Events

———————————————–

Visit the RUC website & memorial list

———————

17 April 1980

 

In January 1981, Patrick Joseph Traynor (27) from Crossmaglen was found guilty of the four murders and a range of other charges. He was jailed for life on each of the four murder charges and was sentenced to 12 years for the related crimes.

———————————————-

BESSBROOK

Army Base

Bessbrook, saw some of the worst violence in the Troubles. 25 British soldiers and local Protestants, all male, lost their lives. Four soldiers died in a non-combat related air accident, but the rest (21 men) were killed by the Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA).

The linen mill was converted by the British Army into a major military base. A helicopter landing area was established to supply other military outposts in the area since road-borne movements of troops and supplies were vulnerable to landmine attack.

At one stage the little village was reportedly the busiest helicopter airport in Europe, more so than the major heliports supplying the North Sea oil rigs. For many years British Army helicopters would take off and land every few minutes. To avoid the risk of missile attack they would fly at rooftop level over the village. For a time, direct access to much of the village was sealed off by security barriers to minimise the risk of vehicle-borne bomb attacks on the security forces. Some have claimed that this contributed to the commercial decline of local businesses.

—————————————————-

 

.

17th April – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

17th April

————————–

Thursday 17 April 1969

Westminster By-Election

In a by-election to the Westminster parliament Bernadette Devlin, standing as a Unity candidate in Mid-Ulster, was elected and, at 21 years of age, became the youngest woman ever to be elected as a Member of Parliament (MP).

Sunday 17 April 1977

Cardinal Willian Conway, then Catholic Primate of Ireland, died in Armagh.

Tuesday 17 April 1979

        

Four Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) officers were killed when the Irish Republican Army (IRA) exploded an estimated 1,000 pound van bomb at Bessbrook, County Armagh.

[This was believed to be the largest bomb used by the IRA to this date.]

See Bessbrook Van Bomb

Saturday 17 April 1982

A British soldier driving an armoured personnel carrier rammed the vehicle into the gable wall that formed ‘Free Derry Corner’. The soldier was later taken into military custody.

Wednesday 17 April 1991

The Combined Loyalist Military Command (CLMC), acting on behalf of the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF), the Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF), and the Red Hand Commandos (RHC), announced that there would be a ceasefire beginning on 30 April 1991.

[The ceasefire was to facilitate the proposed political talks and would last as long as the talks. Attacks by all three organisations continued in the period before the ceasefire.]

Friday 16 April 1993

Dick Spring, then Tánaiste (deputy Irish Prime Minister and Minister for Foreign Affairs), addressed a meeting of the British-Irish Association in Oxford, England. Spring stated that a possible solution to the conflict in Northern Ireland lay in a ‘Europe of the regions’.

Saturday 17 April 1993

Douglas Hurd, then British Foreign Secretary, said that the Republic of Ireland had a “crucial role” in any new talks. He also stated that the Republic’s willingness to consider changes to the Irish Constitution provided a “positive context”.

Monday 17 April 1995

The Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) rerouted an Apprentice Boys of Derry parade away from the lower Ormeau Road area of Belfast. Approximately 200 people had joined a protest against loyal order parades passing through the area.

[There was a further protest on 23 April 1995.]

Wednesday 17 April 1996

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) exploded a bomb in The Boltons, Earls Court, London. The bomb went off in a vacant house and there were no injuries.

Thursday 17 April 1997

Patrick Mayhew, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, referred the cases of two Scots Guards to the Life Sentence Review Board.

The two British soldiers, Mark Wright and James Fisher, were both serving life sentences for the murder of Peter McBride (18) in the New Lodge area of Belfast (on 4 September 1992).

Of the seven men who were arrested on 11 April 1997, three were released, three charged with various offences, and one man was flown to London for questioning about the Docklands bomb on 9 February 1996.

All seven men alleged that they had been beaten while in custody in Gough Barracks in Armagh.

The Council for Catholic Maintained Schools objected to a statement by Julia Neuberger, then Chancellor of the University of Ulster and a Rabbi, in which she criticised the sectarian nature of primary and secondary education in Northern Ireland. Neuberger denied that her statement referred solely to Catholic schools.

The University initially defended the remarks but later apologised to the Council for Catholic Maintained Schools

Friday 17 April 1998

Mark McNeill (32), a former member of the Irish National Liberation Army (INLA), was shot dead by two gunmen as he got out of his taxi on Shaw’s Road in the west of Belfast. McNeill was a father of five.

[It was believed that the attack was a “grudge killing” involving former INLA members and there was speculation that the killing may have been drugs-related.]

David Trimble, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), delivered a speech to the Northern Ireland Forum. Tony Blair, then British Prime Minister, stated that the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) would not be disbanded and that only those prisoners whose organisations were on ceasefire would be release, on licence, from prison.

Saturday 17 April 1999

Ronnie Flanagan, then Chief Constable of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC), announced that John Stevens would conduct a fresh inquire into the killing of Pat Finucane, a Belfast solicitor killed on 12 February 1989.

 

———————————————

Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

 13  People lost their lives on the 17th April   between 1972– 1998

———————————————–

17 April 1972
Patrick Magee, 

  (20) Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot as he walked along Divis Street, Lower Falls, Belfast.

———————————————–

17 April 1972
Patrick Donaghy, 

(86) Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot at the window of his flat, Divis Tower, Divis Flats, Belfast.

———————————————–

17 April 1973


Brian Smyth, 

  (32) Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot by British Army (BA) sniper while standing with group of men, Etna Drive, Ardoyne, Belfast.

———————————————–

17 April 1976
Rachel Hyams,  (79)

nfNIB
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died three weeks after being injured in bomb attack on Ideal Home Exhibition, Olympia, London.

———————————————–

17 April 1977


Trevor McKibben,  (19)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot by British Army (BA) sniper while carrying rifle, Flax Street, Ardoyne, Belfast.

———————————————–

17 April 1979


Paul Gray, (25)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by remote controlled bomb hidden in parked van, detonated when Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) mobile patrol drove past, Bessbrook, County Armagh.

See Bessbrook Van Bomb

———————————————–

17 April 1979


Robert Lockhart,  (44)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by remote controlled bomb hidden in parked van, detonated when Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) mobile patrol drove past, Bessbrook, County Armagh

See Bessbrook Van Bomb

———————————————–

17 April 1979


Richard Baird,  (28)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by remote controlled bomb hidden in parked van, detonated when Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) mobile patrol drove past, Bessbrook, County Armagh

See Bessbrook Van Bomb

———————————————–

17 April 1979


Noel Webb,  (30)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by remote controlled bomb hidden in parked van, detonated when Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) mobile patrol drove past, Bessbrook, County Armagh

See Bessbrook Van Bomb

———————————————–

17 April 1980


Victor Morrow,  (61)

Protestant
Status: ex-Ulster Defence Regiment (xUDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot near to his home, Newtownbutler, County Fermanagh.

———————————————–

17 April 1982
William Morrison,  (42)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot at his farm, Kilturbid Road, Middletown, County Armagh.

———————————————–

17 April 1991


John O’Hara,  (41)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Taxi driver. Shot when lured to bogus call, Dunluce Avenue, off Lisburn Road, Belfast

———————————————–

17 April 1998


Mark McNeill,  (32)

Catholic
Status: ex-Irish National Liberation Army (xINLA),

Killed by: Irish National Liberation Army (INLA)
Taxi driver. Shot while getting out of his car, outside taxi depot, Shaws Road, Anderstown, Belfast.

———————————————–