10th April – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

10th April

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Saturday 10 April 1971

The Republican commemorations held in Belfast of the Easter Rising (in 1916 in Dublin) provided an opportunity to gauge public support for the two wings of the Irish Republican Army (IRA).

The march organised by the Official movement appeared only to attract half the level of support as that organised by the Provisionals

Monday 10 April 1972

Two British soldiers were killed in a bomb attack in Derry. Lord Widgery submitted the report of his findings to Reginald Maudling, then Home Secretary.

Tuesday 10 April 1973

The British government introduced the ‘Northern Ireland Assembly Bill’ in parliament in Westminster. This bill was to pave the way for an assembly at Stormont based on proposals outlined in the White Paper, ‘Northern Ireland Constitutional Proposals‘, which had been published on 20 March 1973.

[The bill became law on 3 May 1973.]

Wednesday 10 April 1974

[Public Records 1974 – Released 1 January 2005: Minutes of a meeting held by the British Cabinet on Wednesday 10 April 1974 at 6.00pm. This part of the minutes deals with the security situation in Northern Ireland.]

Sunday 10 April 1977

Kevin McMenamin (10), a Catholic boy, was killed by the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) when they carried out a bomb attack on a Republican Clubs Easter commemoration parade in the Falls Road area of Belfast.

John Short (49), a Catholic civilian, was shot dead by the Irish Republican Army (IRA) in the Turf Lodge area of Belfast. This killing was part of a feud between the Official and Provisional wings of the IRA.

Friday 10 April 1987

James Molyneaux, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), Ian Paisley, then leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), and eight other Unionist Members of Parliament (MPs) took part in an illegal march in Belfast to protest at new Public Order legislation.

Friday 10 April 1992

Baltic Exchange Bombing

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) exploded two bombs at the Baltic Exchange in the centre of London and killed three people including a 15 year old girl. The IRA warning proved to be inadequate and added to the confusion as it mentioned the Stock Exchange. [In August there were reports in the media that insurance claims amounted to £800 million pounds.

Saturday 10 April 1993

Hume Meets Adams Gerry Adams, then President of Sinn Féin (SF), was seen visiting the home of John Hume, then leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), in Derry. The two men met for “extensive discussions” in their capacities as leaders of their respective parties.

Thursday 10 April 1997

A woman Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) officer was shot and seriously wounded while she was on guard duty outside the Courthouse in the centre of Derry. The Irish Republican Army (IRA) carried out the attack.

Friday 10 April 1998

Good Friday Agreement

After almost 30 years of violence and two years of intensive talks the Northern Ireland Peace Process reached a climax at 5.36pm when George Mitchell, then Chairman of the multi-party talks at Stormont, finally made the historic statement:

“I am pleased to announce that the two governments and the political parties in Northern Ireland have reached agreement”.

The Agreement exceeded Mitchell’s deadline by almost 18 hours, and it was clear that there were elements of the Agreement which did not suit each of the signatories. The main points of the Agreement were: a Northern Ireland Assembly with 108 seats, elected by proportional representation; a 12 member Executive committee of ministers to be elected by the Assembly; the setting up of a North-South Ministerial Council within one year by the Assembly; the council being accountable to Assembly and Daíl; amendments to Articles 2 and 3 of the Irish Constitution, to establish the principle of consent, and the repeal of the (British) Government of Ireland Act; a Council of the Isles with members drawn from assemblies in England, Scotland, Wales, Belfast and Dublin. Later it was learnt that Bill Clinton, then President of the United States of America (USA), had made, and received, a number of telephone calls to party leaders in an effort to encourage them to reach a settlement. Ian Paisley, then leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), was heckled by some Loyalists as he addressed the media at Stormont.

The DUP and the United Kingdom Unionist Party (UKUP), in addition to some leading members of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) led the opposition to the Agreement.

Saturday 10 April 1999

The Orange Volunteers (OV) claimed responsibility for an attack in which a pipe-bomb was exploded at a public house near Templepatrick, County Antrim. One man was injured in the attack. There was an arson attack in north Belfast.

Loyalists resumed their picket outside the Catholic church of Our Lady in Harryville, Ballymena, County Antrim. The picket was held, for the first time since spring 1998, at the church during Saturday evening’s Mass. Protesters said they would return the following weekend.

[The picket had been maintained for a 20 month period between 1997 and 1998.]

Seven men were killed in road accidents during the weekend, four in the Republic of Ireland, and three in Northern Ireland.

Wednesday 10 May 2000

Gerry Loughran was appointed as the head of the Civil Service in Northern Ireland. He was the first Catholic to serve in the post.

Tuesday 10 April 2001

The Northern Ireland Assembly was recalled from recess for an emergency debate, initiated by the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), about a display of Easter lilies in the reception hall of Stormont. The lilies had been commissioned by Sinn Féin (SF). [Easter lilies are a Republican symbol and most Unionists were opposed to the display. However the motion was rejected as it did not receive cross-community support. “What sort of lunacy has descended on this Assembly that we have to be urgently reconvened over a bowl of lilies?” asked Alban Maginness of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP).]

 

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

9 People lost their lives on the 10th April   between 1972– 1992

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10 April 1972
Eric Blackburn,  (24)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Official Irish Republican Army (OIRA)
Killed in bomb attack on British Army (BA) foot patrol, Brooke Park, Rosemount, Derry.

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10 April 1972
Brian Thomasson,  (21)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Official Irish Republican Army (OIRA)
Killed in bomb attack on British Army (BA) foot patrol, Brooke Park, Rosemount, Derry.

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10 April 1974
George Saunderson,  (58)

Protestant
Status: ex-Ulster Defence Regiment (xUDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot at his workplace, Derrylin Primary School, County Fermanagh.

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10 April 1977


Kevin McMenamin,  (7)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Killed in bomb attack on Republican Clubs Easter Commemoration Parade, Beechmount Avenue, Falls, Belfast.

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10 April 1977
John Shortt,  (49)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot while walking with his relatives along pathway, off Springfield Road, Turf Lodge, Belfast. His relative the intended target. Official Irish Republican Army (OIRA) / Irish Republican Army (IRA) feud.

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10 April 1991


Colm Marks,  (29)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC)
Shot while preparing mortar bomb, St Patrick’s Avenue, Downpatrick, County Down

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10 April 1992
Danielle Carter,

  (15)

nfNIB
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by car bomb which exploded outside Baltic Exchange, St Mary Axe, London. Inadequate warning given.

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10 April 1992
Paul Butt,  (29)

nfNIB
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by car bomb which exploded outside Baltic Exchange, St Mary Axe, London. Inadequate warning given.

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10 April 1992
Thomas Casey,   (49)

nfNIB
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by car bomb which exploded outside Baltic Exchange, St Mary Axe, London. Inadequate warning given

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