11th April – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

11th April

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Wednesday 11 April 1979

Two British soldiers died as a result of a gun attack carried out by the Irish Republican Army (IRA) in Ballymurphy, Belfast.

Saturday 11 April 1981

Following the announcement that Bobby Sands had won the Fermanagh / South Tyrone by-election there were celebration parades in many Republican areas across Northern Ireland.

In Belfast, Cookstown and in Lurgan these celebrations ended in rioting.

Monday 11 April 1983

Sentences in First ‘Supergrass’ Trial

In a ‘supergrass’ trial in Belfast 14 Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) members were jailed for a total of 200 years.

The whole trial was based on the evidence of Joseph Bennett. Bennett was granted immunity from prosecution for the crimes he committed, including involvement in killings, in return for his evidence.

[Following other ‘supergrass’ trials it was revealed that those providing evidence were offered substantial sums of money.]

The Belfast shipyard, Harland and Wolff, announced that there would be a further 700 job losses.

Saturday 11 April 1987

        

Robert McLean and  Frederick Armstrong

The IRA killed two Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) officers in Portrush, County Antrim. There were low turnouts at demonstrations on the Unionist ‘Day of Defiance’.

Tuesday 11 April 1989

Restrictions on Sinn Féin (SF) under the ‘Broadcasting Ban’ were lifted for the duration of the local government elections.

Wednesday 11 April 1990

Official Visit by Taoiseach

Charles Haughey, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), made the first official visit to Northern Ireland by a Taoiseach since that by Seán Lemass in 1965. Haughey addressed a conference organised by the Institute of Directors in Belfast. Four hundred loyalists staged a protest against the visit.

Saturday 11 April 1992

Mayhew Appointed Secretary of State

Patrick Mayhew was chosen to replace Peter Brooke as Secretary of State for Northern Ireland. There were further changes at the Northern Ireland Office (NIO) with Michael Mates becoming deputy Secretary of State and the minister responsible for security.

Sunday 11 April 1993

The secret talks held between John Hume, then leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), and Gerry Adams, then President of Sinn Féin (SF), became public knowledge follow a report in the Sunday Tribune (a Republic of Ireland newspaper).

[The talks were criticised by a number of parties and individuals.]

Tuesday 11 April 1995

The Irish government granted early release to seven Irish Republican Army (IRA) prisoners.

Friday 11 April 1997

Seven men were arrested by the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC).

The RUC also recovered a number of weapons including a Barrett Light .50 rifle which was the type of weapon that had been used in a number of Irish Republican Army (IRA) sniper attacks.

[Some of the men were charged and some released on 17 April 1997.]

The Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) announced that it was withdrawing its candidates from the constituencies of West Tyrone and North Belfast. This move was part of a electoral pact to allow the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) the opportunity to maximise the Unionist vote in the contest against the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) and Sinn Féin (SF).

Saturday 11 April 1998

In a “pro” vote, the Good Friday Agreement overcame its first test with 55 members of Ulster Unionist Party Executive voting for it and 23 voting against.

[It had been anticipated that with so many of party’s Members of Parliament (MPs) against the Agreement (including William Ross and William Thompson), the vote would have been much closer.]

Reaction to the Agreement from people and organisations around the world continued to be expressed. There was an overwhelming positive and welcoming response to the news of the Agreement at the multi-party talks in Belfast.

Wednesday 11 April 2001

Grahame Marks (37), a member of the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF), was shot dead at his home, Tullyhue Park, Tandragee, County Armagh. The Loyalist Volunteer Force (LVF) were responsible for the killing which was part of a feud between the LVF and the UVF.

 

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

10 People lost their lives on the 11th April   between 1973 – 2001

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11 April 1973


Keith Evans,   (20)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while on British Army (BA) foot patrol, Westland Street, Bogside, Derry.

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11 April 1974
Norman McKenzie,   (25)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in land mine attack on British Army (BA) mobile patrol, Mullynaburtlan, near Lisnaskea, County Fermanagh.

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11 April 1974
David Sinnamon,   (34)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by remote controlled bomb, hidden in derelict house, detonated when Ulster Defence Regiment foot patrol passed, Dungannon, County Tyrone.

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11 April 1975
Robert Wadsworth,  (21)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot by British Army (BA) immediately after being involved in gun and bomb attack on Jubilee Arms, Lavinia Street, off Ormeau Road, Belfast.

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11 April 1979
Christopher Shanley,  (21)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while travelling in British Army (BA) Armoured Personnel Carrier, Glenalina Crescent, Ballymurphy, Belfast.

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11 April 1979
Stephen Rumble,   (19)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while travelling in British Army (BA) Armoured Personnel Carrier, Glenalina Crescent, Ballymurphy, Belfast. He died 19 April 1979.

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11 April 1980


Fred Wilson,   (43)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty reservist. Shot on his way to work, Franklin Street, Belfast.

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11 April 1987


Robert McLean,   (44)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot while on Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) foot patrol, Main Street, Portrush, County Antrim.

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11 April 1987


 Frederick Armstrong,   (40)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot while on Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) foot patrol, Main Street, Portrush, County Antrim.

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11 April 2001
Grahame Marks,  (37)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF),

Killed by: Loyalist Volunteer Force (LVF)
Shot at his home, Tullyhue Park, Tandragee, County Armagh. Loyalist Volunteer Force (LVF) / Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) feud.

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