Tag Archives: William Hutchinson

15th July – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

15th July

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Wednesday 15 July 1981

Humphrey Atkins, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, announced that representatives of the International Committee of the Red Cross have been invited to carry out an investigation of prison conditions in Northern Ireland.

[Over the next eight days the delegation meets with the two sides to the dispute but announced on 23 July 1981 that they were unable to help resolve the hunger strike.]

Monday 15 July 1985

Margaret Thatcher, then British Prime Minister, delivered a speech to the American Bar Association in London. During her speech Thatcher referred to the role of the media during the conflict in Northern Ireland and said that it would be necessary to starve paramilitary organisations of “the oxygen of publicity”.

Sunday 15 July 1990

Two civilians were shot dead in separate incidents in Belfast and Lisburn.

Thursday 15 July 1993

The Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) released a statement in which the organisation admitted sole responsibility for the Dublin and Monaghan bombs on 17 May 1974. The statement was issued in response to the television documentary ‘Hidden Hand – the Forgotten Massacre’ broadcast on 6 July 1993.

Dublin and Monaghan bombings victim

See  Dublin and Monaghan bombs

Statement

“Following the sinister allegations of collusion mischeviously constructed by presenters of the recent First Tuesday programme which supposedly investigated the 1974 Dublin and Monaghan bombings. The UVF avails itself of this opportunity to state clearly and without reservation that the entire operation was from its conception to its successful conclusion, planned and carried out by our volunteers aided by no outside bodies.

In contrast to the scenario painted by the programme, it would have been unnecessary and indeed undesirable to compromise our volunteers anonimity [sic] by using clandestine Security Force personnel, British or otherwise, to achieve [an] objective well within our capabilities.

The operation whilst requiring a fair degree of preparation and not a little courage did not as was suggested by the so called experts require a great deal of technical expertise.

The comments made by some of those interviewed were at best naive if not deliberately misleading.

Given the backdrop of what was taking place in Northern Ireland when the UVF [were] bombing republican targets at will, either the researchers decided to take poetic licence to the limit or the truth was being twisted by knaves to make [a ] trap for the fools…The minimum of scrutiny should have revealed that the structure of the bombs placed in Dublin and Monaghan were similar if not identical to those being placed in Northern Ireland on an almost daily basis.

The type of explosives, timing and detonating methods all bore the hallmark of the UVF.

It is incredulous that these points were lost on the Walter Mittys who conjured up this programme.

To suggest that the UVF were not, or are not, capable of operating in the manner outlined in the programme is tempting fate to a dangerous degree.”

Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF), Belfast, 15 July 1993.

See  Dublin and Monaghan bombs

Saturday 15 July 1995

John Hume, then leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), said it was his opinion that the Irish Republican Army (IRA) would “get rid” of its arms if Sinn Féin (SF) were included in political talks

Monday 15 July 1996

In a series of raids the London Metropolitan Police found components for making bombs at a number of addresses in Tooting and Peckham, London. The police speculated that the equipment would have been used in bomb attacks on utility installations in London and the south-east of England.

Seven men were arrested in the raids, and a man and a woman were later arrested in Birmingham.

It was revealed in a television programme (BBC’s Panorama) that David Trimble, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), had held a meeting during the Drumcree stand-off with Billy Wright, then a leading Loyalist in Portadown.

The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) accused David Trimble of being in breach of the Mitchell principles. Patrick Mayhew, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, announced the setting up of a committee to review parades in Northern Ireland (the Independent Review of Parades and Marches).

Tuesday 15 July 1997

Bernadette Martin (18), a Catholic civilian, was killed when she was shot four times in the head as she lay asleep in the home of her Protestant boyfriend’s parents at Aghalee, County Armagh.

Although no organisation admitted responsibility (‘no claim, no blame’) the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) and Nationalists were certain that the Loyalist Volunteer Force (LVF) was responsible for the killing.

[The manner in which Bernadette Martin was killed caused revulsion across Northern Ireland.]

Wednesday 15 July 1998

The Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) carried out a search of the ‘field’ at Drumcree where the Orange Order had been holding its protests. The RUC uncovered a home-made sub-machinegun, spent and live ammunition, a number of explosive devices, a five-gallon drum of petrol, two crossbows with over a dozen explosive-tipped darts.

The British government introduced the Northern Ireland Bill into the House of Commons. The Bill was designed to implement the various provisions of the Good Friday Agreement.

Thursday 15 July 1999

Failed Attempt to Form Executive

The attempt to form the Executive of the Northern Ireland Assembly collapsed when David Trimble, then First Minister Designate, and the other Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) Assembly members failed to attend the sitting.

The Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) and the Alliance Party of Northern Ireland (APNI) also refused to nominate members to the Executive. An Executive of Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) members and Sinn Féin (SF) members was formed for a few moments, but was then disbanded because it did not have cross-community participation.

Seamus Mallon then made a statement in which he tendered his resignation from the position of Deputy First Minister designate and called upon David Trimble to also resign.

[The political developments meant that the British and Irish governments were forced to begin a review of the Good Friday Agreement. Marjorie (Mo) Mowlam, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, adjourned the Assembly.

[Mallon was reinstated on 29 November 1999.] An article written by David Trimble on Decommissioning was published in The Irish Times (a Dublin based newspaper).]

Saturday 15 July 2000

An 11 year old boy held an unexploded pipe-bomb for about an hour after it was found near a playground in Armagh. The boy was among a group of children who discovered the device beside a walkway on the Loyalist Ballinahone estate. The Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) said Loyalist paramilitaries could have hidden the bomb with the intention of using it that night or in the following days. It had been stored in a drainage hole in a wall beside the playground.

 

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

9 People lost their lives on the 15th  July between 1972 – 1997

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15 July 1972


Felix Hughes   (35)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Defence Association (UDA)
Abducted somewhere in Portadown, County Armagh. Found shot in drainage ditch, off Watsons Street, Edenderry, Portadown, County Armagh, on 4 August 1972.

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15 July 1972
John Young   (27)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed attempting to defuse bomb by side of road, Silverbridge, near Crossmaglen, County Armagh.

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15 July 1972
John Mooney (17)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot while walking along Ligoniel Road, Ligoniel, Belfast.

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15 July 1972
Kenneth Canham   (24)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while on British Army (BA) foot patrol, Lenadoon Avenue, Belfast

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15 July 1977
William Hutchinson   (33)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Association (UDA),

Killed by: Ulster Defence Association (UDA)
Found shot off Old Glencairn Road, Belfast. Alleged informer.

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15 July 1979
Patrick O’Hanlon  (69)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot in car park of Falls Bowling Club, Andersonstown Road, Belfast

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15 July 1990
William Sloss   (31)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish People’s Liberation Organisation (IPLO)
Shot at his home, Tate’s Avenue, off Lisburn Road, Belfast.

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15 July 1990


Martin Hughes   (33)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot outside his home, Huguenot Drive, Lisburn, County Antrim.

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15 July 1997


Bernadette Martin  (18)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Loyalist Volunteer Force (LVF)
Shot, at her friends home, Soldierstown Road, Aghalee, County Antrim.

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23rd August – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

23rd   August

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

Monday 23 August 1971

A British soldier was killed by the Irish Republican Army (IRA) in Belfast.

Wednesday 23 August 1972

Four civilians and a British Army soldier were injured in separate overnight shooting incidents in Belfast, Holywood, and Lurgan.

Tuesday 23 August 1988

Gerard Harte was extradited from the Republic of Ireland to Northern Ireland

Monday 23 August 1993

Both the Northern Ireland Office (NIO) and Republican sources denied a report on 22 August 1993 in the Sunday Times (a British newspaper) that the British Government and army had drawn up a secret peace strategy towards the end of 1992 involving contacts and eventual talks with the IRA. [A similar claim was made by James Molyneaux, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), on 11 July 1993.] The newspaper claimed that the strategy involved a 60-point blueprint for reducing violence. The NIO reiterated the British government’s position that “there cannot be talks or negotiations with people who use or threaten violence to advance their arguments.” [Details of a series of secret talks were revealed on 28 November 1993.]

Sunday 23 August 1998

David Trimble, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), travelled to Portadown for a meeting with local representatives of the Orange Order about the continuing protest at Drumcree. Trimble was called a “traitor” by Loyalists as he entered the meeti

Wednesday 23 August 2000

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VOLUNTEER SAMUEL ROCKETT

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Samuel Rockett (21), a member of the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF), was shot dead while in his girlfriend’s home in the Lower Oldpark area, north Belfast. The the Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF), a cover name (pseudonym) used by the Ulster Defence Association (UDA), was responsible for the killing. The killing was part of a feud between the UDA and the UVF.

Sunday 23 August 1998

Christopher McWilliams, then Officer Commanding (OC) the Irish National Liberation Army (INLA) in the Maze Prison, declared that the “war is over”.

Thursday 23 August 2001

The security alert on the railway line by the Foyle Bridge in Derry continued for a second day causing disruption to traffic in the city. Later in the afternoon British Army technical officers defused a bomb at the site. The bomb, estimated at 60 kilograms, was based on ‘home-made’ explosives and was planted by the “real” Irish Republican Army (rIRA).

British Army personnel dealt with two pipe-bombs that were uncovered during a search of the Desertmartin Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) club near Magherafelt, County Derry.

There were two other pipe-bomb attacks on GAA clubs at Garvagh and Gulladuff in County Derry the previous day.

There was a security alert in Dungannon, County Tyrone, following a warning that a bomb had been left outside the courthouse on Killyman road. The Red Hand Defenders (RHD), a cover name previously used by the Ulster Defence Association (UDA), claimed to have left the device. The group was also thought to be responsible for the attacks on the GAA clubs.

Loyalist paramilitaries carried out two pipe-bomb attacks on two houses in Deerpark Parade, north Belfast. The attacks happend at approximately 11.00pm (2300BST) and although there were no injuries people living in the two houses suffered from shock. One of the houses was owned by a Catholic family and it was believed that both devices were intended for that property. The family who had lived in the house for 35 years said that they were going to leave the area as their home had been attacked 23 times during 2001.

[The RHD later claimed responsibility for the attack.]

A Protestant family escaped injury when a there was a ‘nail-bomb’ attack on their home in Westland Road, north Belfast. The attack happened at approximately 3.00am (0300BST).

[Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) officers said that they had not established a motive for the attack.]

A Catholic man received multiple cuts to his head when when he was hit by a ‘paint bomb’. The attack happened at 9.30pm (2130BST) in Westland Gardens area of north Belfast.

Around the same time the home of an elderly Catholic couple who lived nearby was attacked by ‘paint bombs’. Two men were taken to hospital following seperate Republican paramilitary ‘punishment’ shootings in west Belfast. One man from the Moyard Crescent area of west Belfast was shot at 10.15pm (2215BST) in the ankles and the elbows. In the other attack, just after 10.00pm (2200BST), in the Beechmont Parade area a man received gunshot wounds to his ankles and one hand.

[Both men were arrested in hospital on Friday 24 August 2001.]

Three men were charged with the possession of documents, between 1987 and 1990, that would have been useful to anyone planning or carrying out acts of terrorism. The charges were brought about as a result of the work of the Stevens Inquiry which is investigating allegations of collusion between the security forces and Loyalist paramilitaries in Northern Ireland. The documents contained details of “suspect” Republican paramilitary members in Newry, County Down, and Dundalk, Republic of Ireland.

[The men appeared before Belfast High Court on 24 August 2001 and were released on bail.]

The Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission (NIHRC) published a report on the rights of lesbian, gay and bisexual people in Northern Ireland. The report found that discrimination against lesbian, gay and bisexual people was widespread in the region.

The report ‘Enhancing the Rights of Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual People in Northern Ireland‘ was compiled by the University of Ulster.

Fowlk Richts, an Ulster Scots human rights group, provided details (Irish Times) of a report it had passed to the British government and the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission on the number of Protestants that had been forced from their homes since 1970. The report stated that an estimated 250,000 protestants had moved home because of direct threats, or indirect threats, or intimidation.

[The figure of 250,000 appears to be much higher than previous estimates. The major periods of forced movement of population occurred during 1969 and 1971 particularly in the Belfast area. Studies at that time showed that of those families forced to move approximately 60 per cent were Catholic and 40 per cent were Protestant; see, for example, Darby (1971).]


23rd   August

 

Today is the anniversary of the follow  people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will life forever

– To  the Paramilitaries  –

“There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

10  people lost their lives on the 23rd of August between 1971 – 2000

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23 August 1971
George Crozier,   (23) nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper, outside Flax Street British Army (BA) base, Ardoyne, Belfast.

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23 August 1972

Alan Tingey,  (25) nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while on British Army (BA) foot patrol, Kenard Avenue, Andersonstown, Belfast.

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23 August 1973

Charles McDonnell,   (20)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Found shot in car, Mayobridge, near Hilltown, County Down.

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23 August 1973
Margaret Meeke,   (52)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while travelling in her car near to her home, Tullyvallen, near Newtownhamilton, County Armagh. Mistaken for Ulster Defence Regiment member’s car.

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23 August 1974


Peter Flanagan,  (47)

Catholic
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Plain clothes Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) member. Shot while in Diamond Bar, George Street, Omagh, County Tyrone.

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23 August 1974
William Hutchinson,   (29)

Protestant
Status: ex-Ulster Defence Regiment (xUDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot while engaged in traffic census, Cabragh, near Dungannon, County Tyrone.

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23 August 1981
William Corbett,   (34) nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot, in error, by another British Army (BA) member while searching grounds of Musgrave Park British Army (BA) Hospital base, Belfast.

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23 August 1983


Ronald Finlay,   (32)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Shot as he left his workplace, Strabane, County Tyrone.

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23 August 1987


Michael Power,   (32)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot while driving his car near to his home, Netherlands Park, Dunmurry, near Belfast, County Antrim.

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23 August 2000


Samuel Rockett,   (21)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot while in his girlfriend’s home, Summer Street, Lower Oldpark, Belfast. Ulster Defence Association (UDA) / Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) feud.

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