Tag Archives: Charles McDonnell

23rd August – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

23rd   August

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

Monday 23 August 1971

A British soldier was killed by the Irish Republican Army (IRA) in Belfast.

Wednesday 23 August 1972

Four civilians and a British Army soldier were injured in separate overnight shooting incidents in Belfast, Holywood, and Lurgan.

Tuesday 23 August 1988

Gerard Harte was extradited from the Republic of Ireland to Northern Ireland

Monday 23 August 1993

Both the Northern Ireland Office (NIO) and Republican sources denied a report on 22 August 1993 in the Sunday Times (a British newspaper) that the British Government and army had drawn up a secret peace strategy towards the end of 1992 involving contacts and eventual talks with the IRA. [A similar claim was made by James Molyneaux, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), on 11 July 1993.] The newspaper claimed that the strategy involved a 60-point blueprint for reducing violence. The NIO reiterated the British government’s position that “there cannot be talks or negotiations with people who use or threaten violence to advance their arguments.” [Details of a series of secret talks were revealed on 28 November 1993.]

Sunday 23 August 1998

David Trimble, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), travelled to Portadown for a meeting with local representatives of the Orange Order about the continuing protest at Drumcree. Trimble was called a “traitor” by Loyalists as he entered the meeti

Wednesday 23 August 2000

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VOLUNTEER SAMUEL ROCKETT

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Samuel Rockett (21), a member of the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF), was shot dead while in his girlfriend’s home in the Lower Oldpark area, north Belfast. The the Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF), a cover name (pseudonym) used by the Ulster Defence Association (UDA), was responsible for the killing. The killing was part of a feud between the UDA and the UVF.

Sunday 23 August 1998

Christopher McWilliams, then Officer Commanding (OC) the Irish National Liberation Army (INLA) in the Maze Prison, declared that the “war is over”.

Thursday 23 August 2001

The security alert on the railway line by the Foyle Bridge in Derry continued for a second day causing disruption to traffic in the city. Later in the afternoon British Army technical officers defused a bomb at the site. The bomb, estimated at 60 kilograms, was based on ‘home-made’ explosives and was planted by the “real” Irish Republican Army (rIRA).

British Army personnel dealt with two pipe-bombs that were uncovered during a search of the Desertmartin Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) club near Magherafelt, County Derry.

There were two other pipe-bomb attacks on GAA clubs at Garvagh and Gulladuff in County Derry the previous day.

There was a security alert in Dungannon, County Tyrone, following a warning that a bomb had been left outside the courthouse on Killyman road. The Red Hand Defenders (RHD), a cover name previously used by the Ulster Defence Association (UDA), claimed to have left the device. The group was also thought to be responsible for the attacks on the GAA clubs.

Loyalist paramilitaries carried out two pipe-bomb attacks on two houses in Deerpark Parade, north Belfast. The attacks happend at approximately 11.00pm (2300BST) and although there were no injuries people living in the two houses suffered from shock. One of the houses was owned by a Catholic family and it was believed that both devices were intended for that property. The family who had lived in the house for 35 years said that they were going to leave the area as their home had been attacked 23 times during 2001.

[The RHD later claimed responsibility for the attack.]

A Protestant family escaped injury when a there was a ‘nail-bomb’ attack on their home in Westland Road, north Belfast. The attack happened at approximately 3.00am (0300BST).

[Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) officers said that they had not established a motive for the attack.]

A Catholic man received multiple cuts to his head when when he was hit by a ‘paint bomb’. The attack happened at 9.30pm (2130BST) in Westland Gardens area of north Belfast.

Around the same time the home of an elderly Catholic couple who lived nearby was attacked by ‘paint bombs’. Two men were taken to hospital following seperate Republican paramilitary ‘punishment’ shootings in west Belfast. One man from the Moyard Crescent area of west Belfast was shot at 10.15pm (2215BST) in the ankles and the elbows. In the other attack, just after 10.00pm (2200BST), in the Beechmont Parade area a man received gunshot wounds to his ankles and one hand.

[Both men were arrested in hospital on Friday 24 August 2001.]

Three men were charged with the possession of documents, between 1987 and 1990, that would have been useful to anyone planning or carrying out acts of terrorism. The charges were brought about as a result of the work of the Stevens Inquiry which is investigating allegations of collusion between the security forces and Loyalist paramilitaries in Northern Ireland. The documents contained details of “suspect” Republican paramilitary members in Newry, County Down, and Dundalk, Republic of Ireland.

[The men appeared before Belfast High Court on 24 August 2001 and were released on bail.]

The Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission (NIHRC) published a report on the rights of lesbian, gay and bisexual people in Northern Ireland. The report found that discrimination against lesbian, gay and bisexual people was widespread in the region.

The report ‘Enhancing the Rights of Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual People in Northern Ireland‘ was compiled by the University of Ulster.

Fowlk Richts, an Ulster Scots human rights group, provided details (Irish Times) of a report it had passed to the British government and the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission on the number of Protestants that had been forced from their homes since 1970. The report stated that an estimated 250,000 protestants had moved home because of direct threats, or indirect threats, or intimidation.

[The figure of 250,000 appears to be much higher than previous estimates. The major periods of forced movement of population occurred during 1969 and 1971 particularly in the Belfast area. Studies at that time showed that of those families forced to move approximately 60 per cent were Catholic and 40 per cent were Protestant; see, for example, Darby (1971).]


23rd   August

 

Today is the anniversary of the follow  people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will life forever

– To  the Paramilitaries  –

“There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

10  people lost their lives on the 23rd of August between 1971 – 2000

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23 August 1971
George Crozier,   (23) nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper, outside Flax Street British Army (BA) base, Ardoyne, Belfast.

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23 August 1972

Alan Tingey,  (25) nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while on British Army (BA) foot patrol, Kenard Avenue, Andersonstown, Belfast.

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23 August 1973

Charles McDonnell,   (20)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Found shot in car, Mayobridge, near Hilltown, County Down.

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23 August 1973
Margaret Meeke,   (52)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while travelling in her car near to her home, Tullyvallen, near Newtownhamilton, County Armagh. Mistaken for Ulster Defence Regiment member’s car.

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23 August 1974


Peter Flanagan,  (47)

Catholic
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Plain clothes Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) member. Shot while in Diamond Bar, George Street, Omagh, County Tyrone.

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23 August 1974
William Hutchinson,   (29)

Protestant
Status: ex-Ulster Defence Regiment (xUDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot while engaged in traffic census, Cabragh, near Dungannon, County Tyrone.

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23 August 1981
William Corbett,   (34) nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot, in error, by another British Army (BA) member while searching grounds of Musgrave Park British Army (BA) Hospital base, Belfast.

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23 August 1983


Ronald Finlay,   (32)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Shot as he left his workplace, Strabane, County Tyrone.

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23 August 1987


Michael Power,   (32)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot while driving his car near to his home, Netherlands Park, Dunmurry, near Belfast, County Antrim.

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23 August 2000


Samuel Rockett,   (21)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot while in his girlfriend’s home, Summer Street, Lower Oldpark, Belfast. Ulster Defence Association (UDA) / Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) feud.

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