Tag Archives: William Elliott

28th June – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

28th June

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Sunday 28 June 1970

Around 500 Catholic workers at the Harland and Wolff shipyard were forced to leave their work by Protestant employees. Most of the Catholic workers were unable to return and lost their jobs.

 

Serious rioting continued in Belfast.

 

Thursday 28 June 1973

Northern Ireland Assembly Election

Elections to the Northern Ireland Assembly were contested in Northern Ireland. There was some violence during the day, some of which was directed against a number of polling stations.

However, the turnout was high at 72.3 per cent.

The election gave those parties supporting the White Paper 52 seats whereas those parties against the paper obtained 26 seats. However, a number of the candidates who were elected with the ‘pro-White Paper’ parties were themselves against the proposals so reducing the margin in the new Assembly.

  

Tuesday 28 June 1983

John Hume, then leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), addressed the House of Commons in Westminster in his ‘maiden speech’. He spoke of Britain’s ‘psychological withdrawal’ from Northern Ireland.

Tuesday 28 June 1988

Margaret Thatcher, then British Prime Minister, met Charles Haughey, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), following a European Community summit in Hanover. The British government announced that the Harland and Wolff shipyard was to be privatised.

Friday 28 June 1991

Cahal Daly, then Archbishop, was elevated by the Pope to Cardinal.

Monday 28 June 1993

It was disclosed that the British Labour Party had produced a discussion document in 1992 on the future of Northern Ireland .

The document contained a proposal that, in the absence of agreement between the political parties, there should be joint authority, between Britain and the Republic of Ireland, over Northern Ireland for a period of 20 years.

[The proposals were welcomed by Nationalists but were rejected by Unionists.]

Wednesday 28 June 1995

Patrick Mayhew, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, said that if Republican and Loyalist paramilitaries did not decommission their weapons then political talks would proceed without their political representatives.

Friday 28 June 1996

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) launched an attack at a British Army barracks in Osnabreuck, Germany. Three mortars were fired in the attack but there were no injuries. Several buildings were damaged.

Saturday 28 June 1997

Following an Orange Order parade on the Springfield Road in west Belfast there were scuffles between the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) and nationalists.

Monday 28 June 1999

A Catholic woman (45) and her six year old son escaped injury when there was a pipe-bomb attack on their south Belfast home.

Police say bomb disposal experts called to the scene in Belfast’s Finaghy area found the remnants of a pipe-bomb which had been pushed through the letter box in the front door.

The attack was carried out by Loyalist paramilitaries.

The Parades Commission issued its decision on the proposed parade by the Portadown District of the Orange Order along the Garvaghy Road, Portadown, on Sunday 4 July 1999. The decision re-routed the Orange Order parade away from the Garvaghy Road and instructed the order to use the outward route when returning from Drumcree.

The decision followed the breakdown of talks between Garvaghy Road residents and the Orange Order.

The Commission also re-routed the ‘Long March’ away from Nationalist areas of Lurgan, County Armagh, on Friday 2 July 1999.

The press conference at which the decisions were announced was disrupted by a bomb alert, which turned out to be a hoax telephone call.

Tony Blair, then British Prime Minister, and Bertie Ahern, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), began a “final push” to end the impasse over decommissioning and the formation of the Executive. David Trimble, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), issued a statement on decommissioning.

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

4  People lost their lives on the 28th  June between 1975 – 1980

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28 June 1975


Patrick Rolston  (16)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Found shot by entrance to Throne Hospital, Whitewell Road, Greencastle, Belfast.

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28 June 1976
John Freeburn   (30)

Protestant
Status: ex-Ulster Defence Regiment (xUDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot while in Celtic Supporters’ Social Club, Edward Street, Lurgan, County Armagh

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28 June 1976

 


William Snowdon  (18)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died five days after being injured in a land mine attack on British Army (BA) foot patrol, Drumlougher, near Crossmaglen, County Armagh

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28 June 1980
William Elliott   (48)

Protestant
Status: ex-Ulster Defence Regiment (xUDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
From Northern Ireland. Shot at cattle mart, Ballybay, County Monaghan.

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24th March – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles 

24th March

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Friday 24 March 1972

Announcement of End of Stormont

Edward Heath, then British Prime Minister, announced that the Stormont Parliament was to be prorogued, and ‘Direct Rule’ from Westminster imposed on Northern Ireland from 30 March 1972. The announcement was greeted with outrage from Brian Faulkner and Unionist politicians.

The main reason for the suspension of Stormont was the refusal of Unionist government to accept the loss of law and order powers to Westminster.

[The legislation responsible for direct rule was the Northern Ireland (Temporary Provisions) Act. Under the legislation a new Northern Ireland Office (NIO) was established at Stormont which was supervised by a new Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, William Whitelaw.]

[Whitelaw eased Internment and gave political status to prisoners because of Billy McKee’s hunger strike.] [ Direct Rule. ]

Monday 24 March 1980

The Constitutional Conference / Atkins Talks were adjourned indefinitely at Stormont with little hope that agreement between the various parties would be possible.

Thursday 24 March 1983

The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), and the Alliance Party of Northern Ireland (APNI), all refused invitations to take part in the New Ireland Forum.

Monday 24 March 1986

Margaret Thatcher, then British Prime Minister, wrote a letter to Unionist leaders in which she rejected a demand for a suspension of the Anglo-Irish Agreement (AIA) to allow talks on devolution to begin.

Tuesday 24 March 1987

James Molyneaux, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), and Ian Paisley, then leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), called for peaceful protests against the new Public Order legislation on 11 April 1987.

Tuesday 24 March 1992

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) exploded a bomb, estimated at 500 pounds, close to the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) station in Donegall Pass, Belfast. The bomb caused extensive damage to property in the surrounding area

Thursday 24 March 1993

Peter Gallagher (44), a Sinn Féin (SF), member was shot dead by the Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF), a cover name (pseudonym) used by the Ulster Defence Association (UDA), at his place of work on Grosvenor Road, Belfast.

Thursday 24 March 1994

John Fee, then a Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) councillor, was severely beaten by Republicans outside his home in Crossmaglen, south Armagh.

The Northern Ireland Affairs Select Committee was constituted with 6 Conservative members, two Labour, two Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), one Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), one Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), and one Ulster Popular Unionist Party (UPUP) member. James Kilfedder (Sir) was announced as the chairman.

Friday 24 March 1995

British Army (BA) patrols of the greater Belfast area were suspended at midnight.

Monday 24 March 1997

In the Maze Prison a tunnel was discovered leading from H-Block 7 which housed Irish Republican Army (IRA) prisoners. The lapse of security drew criticism from many quarters.

David Templeton (43), who was a Presbyterian minister based at Trinity Church in Greyabbey, died six weeks after he had been the subject of a Loyalist ‘punishment’ attack. He died from a pulmonary embolism after his legs were broken.

The Sunday Life had carried a report, 18 months prior to the attack, that customs officers had found an adult gay pornographic video in his possession. No charges had been brought against Templeton in connection with the video.

[During an inquest on 12 November 1997 the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) said that it believed that the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) was responsible for the attack.]

Tuesday 24 March 1998

Dissident Republicans carried out a mortar attack on an Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) station in south Armagh. It was thought that four mortar bombs had been fired at the police barracks in the village of Forkhill. One was believed to have exploded in the grounds of the base, and another to have landed there without exploding. No one was injured in the attack.

Wednesday 24 March 1999

The Orange Volunteers (OV) carried out a grenade attack on a bar outside of Lurgan, County Armagh. Talks involving pro-Agreement parties took place at Stormont. There were efforts to find common ground between the positions of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) and Sinn Féin (SF).

The possibility of Bertie Ahern, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), and Tony Blair, then British Prime Minister, travelling to Belfast was also discussed.

[The two men took part in talks at Hillsborough Castle beginning on 29 March 1999.] Marjorie (Mo) Mowlam, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, stated that she would trigger the d’Hondt mechanism on 2 April 1999.

[D’Hondt was the system for allocating seats in the proposed Executive.]

 

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live  forever

– To  the Paramilitaries  –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

 5 People   lost their lives on the 24th March between 1973– 1997

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24 March 1973
John Huddlestone,   (28)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Shot from passing car, outside his home, Durham Street, Belfast.

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24 March 1974


John Hamilton,  (46)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Found shot near his home, Spruce Street, Donegall Pass, Belfast.

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24 March 1975
William Elliott,   (51)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Post office official. Shot when he arrived at the scene of robbery at Silverbridge Post Office, near Crossmaglen, County Armagh.

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24 March 1993


Peter Gallagher,  (44)

Catholic
Status: Civilian Political Activist (CivPA),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Sinn Fein (SF) member. Shot at his workplace, Westlink Enterprise Centre, Grosvenor Road, Belfast

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24 March 1997


David Templeton,  (43)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Died six weeks after being badly beaten in his home, Fairview Road, Newtownabbey, County Antrim

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28th September – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

28th September

Tuesday 28 September 1971

Tripartite talks continued at Chequers, England.

Sunday 28 September 1975

 The Irish Republican Army (IRA) exploded a bomb in Caterham, Surrey, England

Wednesday 28 September 1977

James Callaghan, then British Prime Minister, and Jack Lynch, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), held a meeting in Downing Street, London. One of the main issues discussed was economic cross-border co-operation.

Thursday 28 September 1978

Joshua Eilberg, then a Democrat Congressman, and Hamilton Fish, then a Republican Congressman, paid a five day visit to Northern Ireland. The two men later argued that the United States of America (USA) should play a part in finding a political settlement in the region.

Friday 28 September 1984 – Saturday 29 September 1984

Security forces in the Republic of Ireland intercepted a trawler, the Marita Ann, off the coast of County Kerry and uncovered seven tons of arms and explosives believed to be on route to the Irish Republican Army (IRA). Five men were arrested during the operation. The haul represented the largest find in the Republic of Ireland since 1973. [In June 1987 four American men were sentenced by an American court for their part in the incident. In August 1987 two American men and two Irish men were also sentenced by a French court.]

Tuesday 28 September 1993

Unionist politicians rejected a suggestion by the Ulster Defence Association (UDA) for a boycott of government.

Thursday 28 September 1995

William Elliott (31), a member of Red Hand Commando (RHC), was shot dead by members of his own Loyalist paramilitary group, while leaving a friends’ house, Primacy Park, Bangor, County Down.

[The killing was the result of an internal RHC dispute. It was alleged that he had been killed because of his part in the killing of Margaret Wright (31) on 7 April 1994.]

Martin McGuinness, then Vice-President of Sinn Féin (SF), held a meeting with Michael Ancram, then Political Development Minister at the Northern Ireland Office (NIO). The meeting was held at the request of SF to discuss the political situation; there was agreement to meet again.

Sunday 28 September 1997

Loyalist who were taking part in the weekly picket of the Catholic church at Harryville, Ballymena, said that they would extend the protest to include Catholic chapels at Ballycastle, Dervcock, and Lisburn. They said that they would continue their protest until the Orange Order was allowed to parade in the Catholic village of Dunloy, County Antrim.

In continuing sectarian tension in the Oldpark area of north Belfast, the homes of three Catholic families were attacked with petrol bombs. There were no serious injuries in the attacks.

Tuesday 28 September 1999

David Trimble, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), criticised loyalist paramilitaries for attacks on Catholics. He also called on people to repudiate “mafia loyalism” in Protestant areas. Trimble quoted figures indicating that Loyalist paramilitaries were responsible for 9 murders, 76 shootings, 178 ‘punishment’ beatings, and over 400 incidents of forced exclusions. The Progressive Unionist Party (PUP) and the Ulster Democratic Party (UDP) criticised Trimble for his remarks.

Friday 28 September 2001

Martin O’Hagan

See Martin O’Hagan Page

Loyalists Kill Journalist Martin O’Hagan (51), a Catholic civilian, who worked as a journalist for the Sunday World (a Dublin based newspaper) was shot dead at 10.45pm (22.45BST) by Loyalist paramilitaries as he walked towards his home with his wife in Lurgan, County Armagh. The Red Hand Defenders (RHD), a cover name previously used by the Ulster Defence Association (UDA) and the Loyalist Volunteer Force (LVF), claimed responsibility for the killing. O’Hagan was the first journalist to be killed during the course of ‘the Troubles’.

[The Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) believed that the LVF was responsible for the killing. O’Hagan had written a number of stories about the activities of the LVF and had been threatened on a number of occasions.]

Ronnie Flanagan, then Chief Constable of the RUC, made a further appeal to political and community leaders to do all they can to try to bring an end to the on-going violence in north Belfast. He again stated his belief that Loyalist paramilitaries, in particular the Ulster Defence Association (UDA), were involved in the shooting and rioting.

John Reid, then Secretary of State, stopped short of officially declaring that the UDA ceasefire was over.

In a statement Reid said the he would give the UDA one last opportunity to end the violence in north Belfast. [Reid had warned the UDA on 31 July 2001 that he was keeping that organisation’s ceasefire under review.] A concrete block was thrown at a school bus in north Belfast. Seven children were injured in the incident. The bus was taking children, aged 12 to 16 years, to Hazelwood Integrated College when it was attacked at Skegoniel Avenue.

[Integrated schools in Northern Ireland are attended by Catholic and Protestant pupils.]


Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the follow  people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live  forever

– To  the Paramilitaries  –

“There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

  7 People lost their lives on the 28th September  between 1972 – 2001

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28 September 1972
Edward Pavis,   (32)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot at his home, Glenvarlock Street, Belfast.

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28 September 1978
Brian Russell,   (30)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Civilian searcher. Shot during sniper attack on British Army (BA) patrol, Waterloo Place, Derry.

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28 September 1981


Alexander Beck,   (37)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in rocket attack on Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) mobile patrol, Glen Road, Andersonstown, Belfast.

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28 September 1982
Ronald Brennan,   (22)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC)
Shot during attempted robbery at Mallusk Post Office, near Belfast, County Antrim.

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28 September 1991
Larry Murchan,  (63)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Loyalist Retaliation and Defence Group (LRDG)
Shot outside his shop, St James Road, Falls, Belfast.

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28 September 1995


William Elliott,  (31)

Protestant
Status: Red Hand Commando (RHC),

Killed by: Red Hand Commando (RHC)
Shot, while leaving friends house, Primacy Park, Bangor, County Down. Internal Red Hand Commando (RHC) dispute.

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28 September 2001

Martin O’Hagan,   (51)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Red Hand Defenders (RHD)
Journalist. Shot while walking near to his home, Westfield Gardens, off Tandragee Road, Lurgan, County Armagh.

See Martin O’Hagan Page

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6th September – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

6th September

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

Monday 6 September 1971

A 14 year old girl was shot dead by a British soldier in Derry. Edward Heath, then British Prime Minister, met with Jack Lynch, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), at Chequers in England to discuss the situation in Northern Ireland.

William Craig and Ian Paisley spoke at a rally at Victoria Park in Belfast before a crowd of approximately 20,000 people. They called for the establishment of a ‘third force’ to defend ‘Ulster’ This was taken to mean the establishment of a paramilitary force in addition to the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) and British Army.

Wednesday 6 September 1978

Adams Cleared of IRA Membership Gerry Adams, then Vice-President of Sinn Féin (SF), was cleared of a charge of membership of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) when the Judge hearing the case ruled that there was insufficient evidence to prove that he was a member of the organisation.

Sunday 6 September 1981

Laurence McKeown Hungry Striker

The family of Laurence McKeown, then on day 70 of his hunger strike, intervened and asked for medical treatment to save his life. The Irish National Liberation Army (INLA) issued a statement saying that it would not replace men on hunger strike at the same rate as before.

[At this stage the INLA had only 28 prisoners in the Maze Prison compared to the Irish Republican Army (IRA) which had approximately 380 prisoners.]

Cahal Daly, then Catholic Bishop of Down and Connor, called on Republican prisoners to end the hunger strike.

Thursday 6 September 1984

The government announced that the proposed project to build a pipe-line to bring natural gas from the Republic of Ireland to Northern Ireland would be cancelled. It was also announced that subsidies to the ‘town gas’ industry in Northern Ireland would end with the loss of 1,000 jobs.

Sunday 6 September 1987

Chris Mullin, then English Labour Party Member of Parliament (MP), claimed that he had tracked down and interviewed those who were really responsible for the Birmingham pub bombs.


See: Birmingham Pub Bombings – 21st November, 1974

Tuesday 6 September 1988

A loyalist paramilitary gun ‘factory’ was discovered by the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) near Ballynahinch, County Down.

[A former member of the Ulster Defense Regiment (UDR) was jailed for his involvement in the gun ‘factory’ in March 1989.]

Tuesday 6 September 1994

Albert Reynolds, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), John Hume, then leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), and Gerry Adams, then President of Sinn Féin (SF), publicly shook hands following a meeting in Dublin. The three leaders issued a joint statement. Andrew Hunter, then MP and Chairman of the Conservative Party’s Committee on Northern Ireland, described the meeting as a “dangerous miscalculation” by Reynolds. John Major, then British Prime Minister, cut short a meeting he was having with Ian Paisley, then leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), at Downing Street.

[It was reported that Major told Paisley, and the other DUP members, to leave after they refused to accept his word that he had not made a secret deal with the Irish Republican Army (IRA).]

Wednesday 6 September 1995

Johnny Adair, believed to be a leader of one of the six brigades of the Ulster Defence Association (UDA), was sentenced to 16 years imprisonment for directing the activities of the Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF), a cover name (pseudonym) used by the UDA.

Friday 6 September 1996

The Forum met for business after a break for the summer. The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) and Sinn Féin (SF) did not attend.

Monday 6 September 1999

Start of Mitchell Review of the Good Friday Agreement George Mitchell, former Chairman of the multi-party talks, was in Castle Buildings to open the Review of the Good Friday Agreement. He made clear that the review would concentrate specifically on breaking the deadlock over decommissioning and the formation of an Executive. The talks adjourned until the following week to give politicians time to study the Patten report on policing. Bertie Ahern, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), held discussions with Tony Blair, then British Prime Minister, to review the political situation in Northern Ireland.

Thursday 6 September 2001

Loyalists held another protest on the Ardoyne Road in north Belfast as Catholic parents and their children made their way to Holy Cross Girls’ Primary School. The protest was peaceful but very noisy as protesters used air horns (klaxons), blew whistles, and banged metal bin lids, as the children passed along the security cordon.

Four parents in the ‘Right to Education’ group were warned by the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) that death threats had been made against them by the Red Hand Defenders (RHD), a cover name that has been used by members of the Ulster Defence Association (UDA). The RHD said they would be killed if they were seen taking their children to the school.

John Reid, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, cut short his holiday and returned to Northern Ireland because of the situation in north Belfast. There was much less violence in the area overnight than on previous nights.

An Orange Order hall was damaged in an arson attack in Warrenpoint, County Down. Sean Neeson, then leader of the Alliance Party of Northern Ireland (APNI), announced that he was stepping down as party leader.

[It is expected that a new leader will be appointed in October.]


Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the follow  people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will life forever

– To  the Paramilitaries  –

“There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

6 People lost their lives on the 6th September  between 1971 – 1983

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06 September 1971


Annette Annette  (14)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot during street disturbances, while standing at the corner of Blucher Street and Westland Street, Derry.

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06 September 1972
Samuel Boyde,   (20)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Found shot in entry off La Salle Drive, Falls, Belfast.

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06 September 1972
William Moore,   (20)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: not known (nk)
Shot from passing car while walking along Castlereagh Street, Belfast.

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06 September 1972
Bridget Breen,  (33)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Killed by bomb thrown into the home of James O’Kane, Republican Labour Party Councillor, Cedar Avenue, off Antrim Road, Belfast.

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06 September 1974

William Elliott,  (48)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Official Irish Republican Army (OIRA)
Shot during armed robbery at Ulster Bank, The Diamond, Rathcoole, Newtownabbey, County Antrim.

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06 September 1983

John Wasson, (61)

Catholic
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish National Liberation Army (INLA)
Off duty. Shot outside his home, Dukes Grove, off Cathedral Road, Armagh.


Main source CAIN Web Service

Major Events in the Troubles

See: Birmingham Pub Bombs

See: 7th September