Tag Archives: William Clarke

3rd August – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

3rd  August

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

Tuesday 3 August 1976

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) carried out a series of six bomb attacks on Portrush, County Antrim.

Monday 3 August 1981

 Liam McCloskey, then an Irish National Liberation Army (INLA) prisoner, joined the hunger strike.

Sunday 3 August 1997

Nationalist residents of Newtownbutler, County Fermanagh, protested against a Royal Black Preceptory march in the village.

The parade was escorted by Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) officers in riot gear. Six people were injured in disturbances.

The Claudy Bombing

The 25th anniversary of the bombing of Claudy, County Derry was marked in the village when approximately 1,500 people attended an open air service

See Claudy Bombing

Although no group claimed responsibility for the explosions it was widely believed that the Irish Republican Army (IRA) had planted the three car bombs in the village which resulted in the deaths of nine people. Inadequate warnings were given about the bombs.

Monday 3 August 1998

In the first break-through of its kind, Nationalists and Loyalists in Derry reached an agreement over the Apprentice Boys march in the city planned for 8 August 1999.

The agreement came after three days of shuttle (indirect) negotiations between the parties. [However, there were some minor disturbances following the march.]

Tuesday 3 August 1999

Security sources confirmed that the Irish Republican Army (IRA) was considered responsible for the death of Charles Bennett on 30 July 1999.

Republican sources claimed he was killed to pacify hardliners over decommissioning and the lack of political progress.

Friday 3 August 2001

The Ardchomhairle of Sinn Féin held a meeting to consider the party’s response to the British and Irish governments’ Implementation Plan. The meeting took place in County Louth, Republic of Ireland.

The Ardchomhairle is comprised of 41 members, including Gerry Adams, then President of SF, Mitchel McLaughlin, then Chairman, Pat Doherty, then Vice-President, and Martin McGuinness.

Sinn Féin rejected Monday’s deadline and said that the party needed to see the detail and guarantees on policing reform and demilitarisation.

In the days following the meeting SF said it needed to see more detail on policing, demilitarisation and criminal justice before it could support the package.

 3rd August   2010

Óglaigh na hÉireann claimed responsibility for detonating a 200 lb car bomb outside Strand Road PSNI station in Derry.

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

10  People lost their lives on the 3rd of August between 1972  – 1992

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03 August 1972

William Clark,   (34) nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed attempting to defuse bomb discovered by side of road, Urney, near Clady, County Tyrone.

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03 August 1972

Robert McCrudden,   (19)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot during gun battle, Hooker Street, Ardoyne, Belfast.

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03 August 1973
James Farrell,  (50) nfNIRI
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot, during armed robbery, while delivering wages to British Leyland factory, Cashel Road, Crumlin, Dublin.

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 03 August 1974

Martin Skillen, (21)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot from British Army (BA) undercover observation post in Clonard cinema building, Falls Road, Belfast.

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 03 August 1974
Charles McKnight,   (25)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by booby trap bomb when he entered the cab of his employer’s lorry, parked outside house, Ballycraigy, Newtownabbey, County Antrim.

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 03 August 1976
Alan Watkins,   (20) nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish National Liberation Army (INLA)
Shot by sniper while on British Army (BA) foot patrol, Dungiven, County Derry.

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03 August 1979
Whilliam Whitten  (65)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died six weeks after being injured in bomb attack on Marine Hotel, Ballycastle, County Antrim. He was wounded on 19 June 1979. Inadequate warning given.

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 03 August 1980
William Clarke, (59)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Shot while travelling in his car along laneway, Gortnessy, near Pettigoe, County Donegal.

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 03 August 1988

Raymond McNicholl,  (30)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Shot by sniper, while driving his car to work, Desertcreat Road, near Cookstown, County Tyrone.

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03 August 1992
Damian Shackleton,   (24) nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while on British Army (BA) mobile patrol, Duncairn Avenue, New Lodge, Belfast.

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20th November – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

20th November

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Monday 20th  November 1972

Two British soldiers were killed in a booby trap bomb in Cullyhanna, County Armagh.

Tuesday 20 November 1973

The Ulster Unionist Council, then the policy making branch of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), voted by 379 to 369 in favour of power-sharing. [ Political Developments. ]

Thursday 20 November 1975

The Northern Ireland Office (NIO) published the Northern Ireland Constitutional Convention Report.

[The Report was debated in the House of Commons on 12 January 1976. The United Ulster Unionist Council (UUUC) later published a pamphlet entitled ‘A Guide to the Convention Report‘.]

Tuesday 20 November 1979

White Paper Published (Cmnd 7763) Humphrey Atkins, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, published a consultative document in the form of a White Paper called The Government of Northern Ireland: A Working Paper for a Conference (Cmnd 7763). The stated aim of the conference talks was to achieve

“the highest level of agreement … which will best meet the immediate needs of Northern Ireland”.

The White Paper however ruled out discussion on a number of possible ‘solutions’ to the conflict, namely, a United Ireland, confederation, or independence for Northern Ireland. The paper also excludes discussion on the constitutional status of the region. The paper states that ‘direct rule’ from Westminster is not a satisfactory basis for the government of Northern Ireland.

[James Molyneaux, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), rejected the invitation to talks. The fact that an ‘Irish dimension’ had been ruled out of the talks caused a split in the response of Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) to the invitation (see 22 November 1979). Atkins was later to allow parallel talks which allowed the SDLP to raise the question of an Irish dimension in any solution.]

Thursday 20 November 1980

Margaret Thatcher, then British Prime Minister, stated in the House of Commons:

“The government will never concede political status to the hunger strikers, or to any others convicted of criminal offences in the province.”

Sunday 20 November 1983

Darkley Killings Three members of the Mountain Lodge Pentecostal Church, Darkley near Keady, County Armagh, were shot dead in an attack that was claimed by the ‘Catholic Reaction Force’ (CRF). Seven other people were injured in the attack. [The CRF was believed to be a covername used by the Irish National Liberation Army (INLA).]

Wednesday 20 November 1985

Tom King, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, was physically attacked by Loyalist protesters as he arrived for a function at Belfast City Hall. The protests were against the Anglo-Irish Agreement (AIA). [George Seawright, then a Loyalist councillor, was jailed for nine months in October 1986 for his part in this protest.]

Tuesday 20 November 1990

John Bruton was elected as the new leader of Fine Gael.

Wednesday 20 November 1991

The Anglo-Irish Intergovernmental Conference (AIIC) held a meeting in Dublin. Ray Burke, then Minister for Justice in the Irish government, confirmed that there would be changes to the laws on extradition.

Saturday 20 November 1993

John Hume, then leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), held another meeting with Gerry Adams, then President of Sinn Féin (SF). The two leaders issued a third joint statement.

Wednesday 20 November 1996

Leaders of the Ulster Democratic Party (UDP) and the Progressive Unionist Party (PUP) held a meeting with John Major, then British Prime Minister, at Downing Street, London. The leaders of the two Loyalist parties warned Major that the impasse over the issue of decommissioning arms in the Stormont talks could put the Loyalist ceasefire in “jeopardy”.

Thursday 20 November 1997

The Continuity Irish Republican Army (CIRA) left a small bomb behind Belfast City Hall. The Progressive Unionist Party (PUP) claimed that the device was aimed at their ground floor office.

David Trimble, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), headed a five person delegation which held a meeting with Bertie Ahern, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), in London. The meeting was described as positive by both sides.

Saturday 20 November 1999

Peter Mandelson, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, gave a speech about political developments to the annual conference of the Northern Ireland Women’s Coalition (NIWC).

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following  people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live  forever

– To  the Paramilitaries  –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

10 People lost their lives on the 20th November between 1972 – 1983

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20 November 1972


William Clarke,  (41)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Defence Association (UDA)
Taxi driver. Died three weeks after being shot by passenger, Forthriver Road, Glencairn, Belfast. Assumed to be a Catholic.

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20 November 1972


William Watson,  (28)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by booby trap bomb in derelict house, Cullyhanna, County Armagh.

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20 November 1972


James Strothers,   (31)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA), K

illed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by booby trap bomb in derelict house, Cullyhanna, County Armagh.

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20 November 1974
Kevin Regan,   (26) Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Died five days after being shot during gun attack on Maguire’s Bar, Lower Cross Street, Larne, County Antrim.

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20 November 1974


Robert Forde,   (29)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by booby trap bomb hidden under pathway, Rathmore, Craigavon, County Armagh

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20 November 1974


Patrick Falls,   (49)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot during gun attack on Falls Bar, Aughamullan, near Coalisland, County Tyrone.

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20 November 1982


Michael Fay,  (25)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Protestant Action Force (PAF)
Found shot in his car, Mount Regan Avenue, Dundonald, Belfast.

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20 November 1983


David Wilson,  (44)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Catholic Reaction Force (CRF)
Shot in the entrance hall to Mountain Lodge Pentecostal Church, Darkley, near Keady, County Armagh.

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20 November 1983


Harold Brown,   (59)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Catholic Reaction Force (CRF)
Shot in the entrance hall to Mountain Lodge Pentecostal Church, Darkley, near Keady, County Armagh.

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20 November 1983


Victor Cunningham,  (39)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ), K

illed by: Catholic Reaction Force (CRF)
Shot in the entrance hall to Mountain Lodge Pentecostal Church, Darkley, near Keady, County Armagh.

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