Tag Archives: Steven Mullan

30th October – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

 30th October

Wednesday 30 October 1968

Jack Lynch, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), met with Harold Wilson, then British Prime Minister, in London. The Taoiseach called for the ending of partition as a means to resolve the unrest in Northern Ireland. The Irish Times (a Dublin based newspaper) carried a report of an interview with Lord Brookeborough (former Prime Minister of Northern Ireland).

[ Derry March; Civil Rights; Anglo-Irish Relations; Partition]

Friday 30 October 1970

There were serious riots in the Catholic Ardoyne area of Belfast which lasted for three nights. Chichester-Clark, then Northern Ireland Prime Minister, met with Reginald Maulling, then British Home Secretary, on matters related to reforms and security.

Saturday 30 October 1971

A British soldier was killed in a bomb attack in Belfast.

Monday 30 October 1972

The Northern Ireland Office (NIO) issued a discussion document The Future of Northern Ireland. The paper states Britain’s commitment to the union as long as the majority of people wish to remain part of the United Kingdom (UK).

The paper also introduces the ideas of a power-sharing government in Northern Ireland and an ‘Irish Dimension’. Loyalist paramilitaries carried out a raid on an Royal Ulster Constabulary station in Claudy, County Derry, and stole 4 British Army issue Sterling sub-machine Guns (SMGs) that had been issued to Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR) soldiers. #

[There was another theft of UDR weapons on 8 March 1973.] [ Political Developments. ]

Saturday 30 October 1976

Two Catholic civilians were abducted and shot dead by the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) at Glenbank Place, Crumlin Road, Belfast. Stephen McCann (20), a Catholic civilian, was abducted and killed at the rear of Glencairn Community Centre, Belfast. Members of he Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) gang known as the ‘Shankill Butchers’ were responsible for the killing. [See: 20 February 1979] McCann had been a founder member of the Witness for Peace movement and author of the song ‘What Price Peace?’

Thursday 30 October 1980 [ Hunger Strike.]

Wednesday 30 October 1985

James Molyneaux, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), and Ian Paisley, then leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), attended a meeting at Downing Street, London, with Margaret Thatcher, then British Prime Minister.

The two Unionists again protested at the continuing Anglo-Irish talks between the two governments. They warned that a consultative role in Northern Ireland affairs for the government in the Republic of Ireland would lead to a Loyalist backlash.

[ PRONI Records – October 1985]

Wednesday 30 October 1991

Desmond Ellis was acquitted of conspiring to cause explosions at a court in London.

[Ellis had been involved in an extradition dispute between the Republic of Ireland and Britain earlier in the year. On the following day the British Home Secretary signed an ‘exclusion order’ which banned Ellis from living in Britain.]

Friday 30 October 1992

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) exploded a bomb, estimated at 250 pounds, at Glengormley Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) station. Thirteen people were injured in the explosion and over 100 houses were damaged. The IRA forced a taxi driver in London to transport a bomb to a location close to Downing Street where it later exploded.

Saturday 30 October 1993

See Greysteel Article

See Shankill Butchers

Saturday 30th  October 1993

Greysteel Killings

Greysteel Killings The Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF), a cover name (pseudonym) used by the Ulster Defence Association (UDA), killed six Catholics civilians and one Protestant civilian in an attack on the ‘Rising Sun’ bar in Greysteel, County Derry. A further 13 people were injured in the attack one of whom later died of his injuries on 14 April 1994. [One of the gunmen was hear to say “trick or treat” before he fired into the crowded bar. This was a reference to the Halloween celebration that was taking place. There was widespread condemnation of the attack. The UFF later claimed that it had attacked the “Nationalist electorate” in revenge for the Shankill Road Bombing on 23 October 1993. The killings brought the total number of deaths during October to 27 making it the worst month for casualties in 17 years.]

Sunday 30 October 1994

There were scuffles on the Ormeau Road, Belfast, between Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) officers and local residents who were protesting against an Orange Order parade passing through their area. Speaking in Dublin Gerry Adams, then President of Sinn Féin (SF), said that there were “clear efforts” by the British government to reduce the momentum of the peace process.

Thursday 30 October 1997

The Continuity Irish Republican Army (CIRA) said that it was responsible for the attempted bombing of government offices in Derry. The United Nations (UN) called for an judicial inquiry into the killing of Pat Finucane, at the time a solicitor based in Belfast, on 12 February 1989.

Finucane had represented a number of Republicans in high profile cases.

The Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF), a covername used by the Ulster Defence Association (UDA), claimed responsibility for the killing. Republicans alleged that the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) had colluded with the UFF in targeting Finucane. The UN also criticised the Law Society for not defending lawyers from threats and harassment from members of the security forces. Marjorie (Mo) Mowlam, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, gave an interview which was published by New Statesman in which she accused civil servants in the Northern Ireland Office (NIO) of undermining the peace process by engaging in a series of leaks to the media and political parties. Jack Straw, then British Home Secretary, announced in the House of Commons that the final 12 exclusion orders would be revoked.

He also announced that new ‘anti-terrorist legislation’ would be introduced on a United Kingdom (UK) wide basis. The Committee on the Administration of Justice (CAJ), based in Belfast, called on the government to repeal all emergency legislation. There was an election in the Republic of Ireland to elect a new President. [When the counting was completed Mary McAleese was elected as the eight President of Ireland.]

Tuesday 30 October 2001

Brian Cowen, then Irish Minister for Foreign Affairs, called on the British government to demilitarise places such as south Armagh and west Tyrone “very quickly”. He was speaking in New York, USA, at a meeting of the National Committee on American Foreign Policy.

A Protestant man was charged at Belfast Magistrates’ Court with ‘riotous behaviour’ in connection with sectarian clashes at Limestone Road, north Belfast, on Sunday 28 October 2001. Kenneth Bloomfield (Sir), former head of the Northern Ireland civil service, said that a commissioner should be appointed to safeguard the interests of victims of ‘the Troubles’.

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following  people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live  forever

– To  the Paramilitaries  –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

  16  People lost their lives on the 30th October  between 1971 – 2001

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30 October 1971
Norman Booth,   (22)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in bomb attack on British Army (BA) observation post, junction of Springfield Road and Cupar Street, Belfast.

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30 October 1974


Gordon Catherwood,  (44)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot at his home, Upper Hightown Road, near Belfast, County Antrim.

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30 October 1974


Michael Meenan,  (16)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in premature bomb explosion at garage, Strand Road, Derry.

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30 October 1975


Eileen Kelly, (6)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot at her home, Beechmount Grove, Falls, Belfast. Father intended target. Official Irish Republican Army (OIRA) / Irish Republican Army (IRA) feud.

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30 October 1976
Stephen McCann,  (20)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Abducted while walking along Millfield, Belfast. Found stabbed and shot a short time later, near the Community Centre, off Forthriver Road, Glencairn, Belfast.

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30 October 1976


Charles Corbett,   (22)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Abducted while travelling in newspaper delivery van, Crumlin Road, Belfast. Found shot a short time later, Glenbank Place, off Crumlin Road, Belfast.

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30 October 1976


John Maguire,   (56)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Abducted while travelling in newspaper delivery van, Crumlin Road, Belfast. Found shot a short time later, Glenbank Place, off Crumlin Road, Belfast.


 Steven Mullan,  (20)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot during gun attack on Rising Sun Bar, Greysteel, County Derry.

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30 October 1993


Karen Thompson,  (19)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot during gun attack on Rising Sun Bar, Greysteel, County Derry.

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30 October 1993


James Moore, (81)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot during gun attack on Rising Sun Bar, Greysteel, County Derry.

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30 October 1993


Joseph McDermott,  (60)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot during gun attack on Rising Sun Bar, Greysteel, County Derry.

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30 October 1993


Moira Duddy,  (59)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot during gun attack on Rising Sun Bar, Greysteel, County Derry.

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30 October 1993
John Moyne,  (50)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot during gun attack on Rising Sun Bar, Greysteel, County Derry.

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30 October 1993


John Burns,  (54)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot during gun attack on Rising Sun Bar, Greysteel, County Derry.

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30 October 1993
Victor Montgomery,  (76)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot during gun attack on Rising Sun Bar, Greysteel, County Derry. He died 14 April 1994.

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30 October 2001
Charles Folliard,   (
30)

Protestant
Status: ex-Ulster Defence Association (xUDA),

Killed by: non-specific Republican group (REP)
Shot outside his girlfriend’s home, Oakland Park, Ballycolman, Strabane, County Tyrone.

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See Greysteel Article

See Shankill Butchers

The Greysteel shootings – 30 October 1993

 

The Greysteel Massacre

The Greysteel massacre was a mass shooting that happened on the evening of 30 October 1993 in Greysteel, County Derry, Northern Ireland. Three members of the Ulster Defence Association (UDA), a loyalist paramilitary group, opened fire in a crowded pub during a Halloween party, killing eight civilians and wounding thirteen.

The pub was in an Irish Catholic and Irish nationalist area. The group claimed responsibility using their cover name “Ulster Freedom Fighters” and said that the attack was revenge for the Shankill Road bombing a week earlier.

See Shankill Road Bombing

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Disclaimer

The views and opinions expressed in these documentaries are soley intended to educate and provide background information to those interested in the Troubles of Northern Ireland. They in no way reflect my own opinions and I take no responsibility for any inaccuracies or factual errors.

The Innocent Victims

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30 October 1993


Steven Mullan,   (20)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot during gun attack on Rising Sun Bar, Greysteel, County Derry.

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30 October 1993


Karen Thompson,  (19)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot during gun attack on Rising Sun Bar, Greysteel, County Derry.

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30 October 1993


James Moore,  (81)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot during gun attack on Rising Sun Bar, Greysteel, County Derry.

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30 October 1993


Joseph McDermott,   (60)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot during gun attack on Rising Sun Bar, Greysteel, County Derry.

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30 October 1993


Moira Duddy,  (59)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot during gun attack on Rising Sun Bar, Greysteel, County Derry.

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30 October 1993
John Moyne,  (50)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot during gun attack on Rising Sun Bar, Greysteel, County Derry.

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30 October 1993

John Burns,   (54)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot during gun attack on Rising Sun Bar, Greysteel, County Derry.

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30 October 1993
Victor Montgomery,  (76)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot during gun attack on Rising Sun Bar, Greysteel, County Derry. He died 14 April 1994

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Background

On 23 October 1993, a Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA) bomb prematurely exploded in a fish shop on Shankill Road, west Belfast. Eight Protestant civilians, one UDA member and one of the IRA bombers were killed.

The IRA’s intended target was a meeting of UDA leaders, including brigadier Johnny Adair, which was to take place above the shop. Unknown to the IRA, the meeting had been rescheduled. Shortly after two IRA members, Thomas Begley and Sean Kelly, entered the shop dressed as deliverymen and carrying the time bomb under a tray, it exploded accidentally, killing Begley along with the nine others inside the shop at the time. This became known as the Shankill Road bombing.

The UDA launched a number of “revenge attacks” for the bombing. Later that day, it shot a Catholic delivery driver after luring him to a bogus call at Vernon Court, Belfast. He died on 25 October.

On 26 October, the UDA shot dead another two Catholic civilians and wounded five in an attack on the Council Depot at Kennedy Way, Belfast.

Planning

 

UDA/UFF flags flying in Derry, where the massacre was planned

 

The Londonderry Sentinel newspaper revealed that the massacre had been carefully planned. Those involved in planning and organising the attack were Billy McFarland (‘Brigadier’ of the UDA’s North Antrim & Londonderry Brigade), a UDA commander with the initials ‘RS’, and Brian McNeill.

Stephen Irwin, Geoffrey Deeney and Torrens Knight, all members of the UDA’s North Antrim & Londonderry Brigade, were to carry out the shooting. According to court documents, the gunmen were first briefed on the plans for the massacre on 27 October in a house-office owned by the Ulster Democratic Party at Bond’s Place, Derry.

Before the massacre, the gunmen went to the pub to familiarise themselves with the layout and choose the best positions from which to shoot. Knight turned the office at Bond’s Place into a mock-up of the pub and made Irwin and Deeney rehearse the shooting. It was agreed that Irwin would enter the Rising Sun armed with an AK-47 and keep shooting until the magazine emptied.

Whilst Irwin reloaded, Deeney would fire from his 9 mm semi-automatic pistol. Both would then keep shooting until Irwin’s second magazine was empty. Knight, armed with a shotgun, would ‘cover’ the front door.

Two cars would be used for the attack. The gunmen would drive to the pub in an Opel Kadett with McNeill driving in front as a ‘scout car’. After the shooting, the gunmen would drive the Kadett to a pick-up point near Eglinton, where they would meet McNeill and the Kadett would be burnt.

The massacre

On the evening of 30 October, the three UDA members, two of whom were wearing blue boiler suits and balaclavas, entered the “Rising Sun Bar” in Greysteel. There were about 70 people inside attending a Halloween party,and so the masked men were not noticed until they produced an AK-47 and a 9 mm pistol, and started shooting into the packed crowd in the lounge area.

The leading gunman, Stephen Irwin (who was carrying the AK-47), yelled “trick or treat” as he opened fire.

The scene was chaotic as people inside the lounge began to scream in panic, with women pleading for mercy from the gunmen. Six of those killed were Catholic civilians and two were Protestant civilians. None had any known links to political parties or paramilitaries. The killers, laughing, then made their escape in their getaway car—an Opel Kadett driven by Torrens Knight. Afterwards they were said to have boasted about the killings.

The following day, the UDA claimed responsibility for the attack using the cover name “Ulster Freedom Fighters” (UFF). Its statement said that the “Greysteel raid” was “the continuation of our threats against the nationalist electorate that they would pay a heavy price for last Saturday’s slaughter of nine Protestants”.

A West Belfast UDA member said that his organisation:

“had information that senior IRA men drank in the Rising Sun … Unfortunately they were not there on Halloween but our boys acted on the briefing they had been given”.

The pub is still open in Greysteel. There is a memorial to the victims outside the building that says: May their sacrifice be our path to peace.

Convictions

In 1995, Irwin, Deeney and Knight were convicted along with two others for involvement in the attack.  Knight was also convicted for the Castlerock killings. In 2000, they were released early—along with other paramilitary prisoners—under the terms of the Good Friday Agreement.

After his release, Irwin joined the Neo-Nazi militant group Combat 18. Knight was also alleged to have had links to Combat 18.

In 2005, Irwin received a four-year prison sentence for slashing a man with a knife. This meant that he also now had to serve the eight life sentences he received for the Greysteel massacre.

In 2006, he abandoned an appeal against the sentences.

In September 2013, Irwin was released from prison a second time after submitting an application to the Sentence Review Commissioners for early release. The commissioners ruled his application should be granted and he was released immediately.

There have been claims in the media that Knight was a paid Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) and/or MI5 informer. Knight denied the claims.

In October 2007, a Police Ombudsman investigation concluded that police did not have any prior knowledge that could have helped them prevent the Greysteel attack. The investigators did not find any evidence that Knight was protected from the law.

See: Shankill Bomb