Tag Archives: John Thompson

12th October – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

Sunday 12 October 1975

There was a split in the Vanguard Unionist Progressive Party (VUPP) following William Craig’s support for a coalition with the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP). Craig was expelled from the United Ulster Unionist Council (UUUC) for advocating a coalition with the SDLP.

Thursday 12 October 1978

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) planted a bomb on the Belfast to Dublin train and one woman was killed and two others injured when it exploded without adequate warning.

Friday 12 October 1984

See Brighton Bombing

Brighton Bombing The Irish Republican Army (IRA) carried out a bomb attack on the Grand Hotel, Brighton, England, which was being used as the base for the Conservative Party’s annual conference. Four people were killed in the attack and another person died later from injuries received.

[The attack was an attempt to kill Margaret Thatcher, then British Prime Minister, and members of her cabinet and it very nearly succeeded. It was later discovered that the bomb had been planted with a long delay timing device in one of the rooms of the hotel.

The IRA later issued a statement directed at Thatcher:

 Today, we were unlucky, but remember, we only have to be lucky once – you will have to be lucky always.

Neil Kinnock, then leader of the Labour Party, said during a television interview that Irish Unity would not be achieved for many decades.

Sunday 12 October 1986

Charles Haughey, then leader of Fianna Fáil (FF), said that since the signing of the Anglo-Irish Agreement (AIA) the position of Nationalists in Northern Ireland had ‘seriously worsened’ and that when FF returned to government his party would seek to renegotiate the Agreement.

Thursday 12 October 1995

Patrick Mayhew, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, spoke at the Conservative Party’s annual conference. He said that the British and Irish governments were willing to invite an international commission to look at the question of paramilitary weapons. At the same time preliminary talks could begin.

Saturday 12 October 1996

The Progressive Unionist Party (PUP) held its annual conference. Leaders of the PUP appealed to the loyalist paramilitary groups to maintain their ceasefire. Gerry Adams, then President of Sinn Féin (SF), warned that Northern Ireland was on the edge of an abyss and called for talks that would include SF.

Sunday 12 October 1997

Loyalists demonstrated against a parade held in Rosslea, County Fermanagh, to commemorate the United Irishmen rising in 1798. During the demonstration Loyalists clashed with Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) officers. Loyalists held a rally at Belfast City Hall to mark the third anniversary of the Combined Loyalist Military Command (CLMC) ceasefire. Among those taking part was a ‘colour party’ of the Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF).

[Nationalists later criticised the display on behalf of the UFF.]

Garry McMichael, then spokesperson for the Ulster Democratic Party (UDP), paid tribute to the “resilience and fortitude” of Loyalist prisoners. David Andrews, then Irish Foreign Minister, said on Radio Telefis Éireann (RTE) that a United Ireland “is not achievable in my lifetime”. His comments drew criticism from Sinn Féin (SF). The Sunday Post (a Republic of Ireland newspaper) published a leaked memo that alleged that Mary McAleese, then Fianna Fáil (FF) candidate for President of the Republic of Ireland, had political sympathies towards SF. The memo came from an unnamed civil servant in the Department of Foreign Affairs.

Monday 12 October 1998

It was announced that the Pope would pay a visit to Ireland.

Tuesday 12 October 1999

George Mitchell said he would hold the talks on the Review of the Agreement to London so as to try to avoid some of the close media scrutiny.

Thursday 12 October 2000

There was a pipe-bomb attack on the home of a father-of-two in east Belfast. No-one was injured when the device exploded under the man’s car in Bathgate Drive. Army bomb disposal experts had sealed off the area following a telephone warning to the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) at 8.30pm. It is understood the man and his teenage son were at home at the time of the attack.

Friday 12 October 2001

Loyalist Paramilitary Groups ‘Specified’ John Reid, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, gave a press conference at Hillsborough Castle, County Down, and announced that he was “specifying” the Ulster Defence Association (UDA), the Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF), and the Loyalist Volunteer Force (LVF). This meant that the British government considered the UDA, UFF, and LVF ceasefires to be at an end.

The move was welcomed by Nationalists but some Unionists said that the Irish Republican Army (IRA) should also have been specified. In response to this criticism Reid said that: “the nature and scale of the organisations’ violence … [was] … different from any other organisations.

[Reid had given the Loyalist paramilitaries a warning about their activities on 28 September 2001. The action did not result in additional sanctions against the paramilitary groups. However, those prisoners who were released on licence can be return to jail if there is evidence that they have been engaged in paramilitary activities. The Loyalist groups had first called a ceasefire on 13 October 1994.]

Two men were shot in separate paramilitary ‘punishment’ attacks in Belfast. One man (23) was shot six times in the thighs as he lay in bed. Three masked men had entered the house where he was sleeping in Fortwilliam Park, north Belfast. The man was also beaten after being shot. A young man (17) was shot once in the calf as he lay in bed in a house in Dundonald, east Belfast. Both men were treated in hospital for their wounds. The British Army was called to deal with an “improvised explosive device” in Portadown, County Armagh. A suspicious object had been noticed under a vehicle in the driveway of a house in Hartfield Square shortly before 4.00am (04.00BST).

Colm Murphy

See Omagh Bombing

See 29 Innocent people slaughtered by Republicans

See deaths in the Troubles 15th August

The trial of Colm Murphy, charged in connection with the Omagh bombing, began in the Special Criminal Court in Dublin. Murphy was accused of conspiring with another person to cause an explosion. Murphy, originally from County Armagh, had an address at Ravensdale, County Louth, Republic of Ireland. He was also charged with membership of an illegal organisation.

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following  people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die.”
Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live  forever

– To  the Paramilitaries  –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

13 People lost their lives on the 12th October  between 1971 – 1993

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12 October 1971
John Thompson, (21)

Protestant
Status: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Died one month after being injured in premature bomb explosion at house, Bann Street, Lower Oldpark, Belfast. Incident occurred on 13 September 1971.

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12 October 1973


Raymond McAdam,  (24)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed during bomb attack on shop, Annaghmore, near Newtownbutler, County Fermanagh.

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12 October 1974
Michael McKenzie,  (19)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Shot while walking along Ellis Street, Carrickfergus, County Antrim.

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12 October 1977
Francis Canavan,   (47)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot while driving school bus, Tirnaskeagh, near Ballygawley, County Tyrone. Off duty Ulster Defence Regiment member intended target.

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12 October 1978
Letitia McCrory,  (55) nfNI
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
From County Dublin. Killed in bomb attack while travelling on train, near Central Station, Belfast. Inadequate warning given.

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12 October 1979


John Donaldson,  (24)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot shortly after leaving Andersonstown British Army (BA) / Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) base, Belfast.

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12 October 1981


Robert Ewing, (34)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot at his home, Deerpark Road, Oldpark, Belfast.

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12 October 1984


Anthony Berry,   (59) nfNIB
Status: Civilian Political Activist (CivPA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Member of Parliament. Killed in time bomb attack at Conservative Party Conference, Grand Hotel, Brighton, Sussex, England.

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12 October 1984


Eric Taylor,  (54) nfNIB
Status: Civilian Political Activist (CivPA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Member of Conservative Party. Killed in time bomb attack at Conservative Party Conference, Grand Hotel, Brighton, Sussex, England.

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12 October 1984


Roberta Wakeham,   (45) nfNIB
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in time bomb attack at Conservative Party Conference, Grand Hotel, Brighton, Sussex, England.

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12 October 1984


Jeanne Shattock, (52) nfNIB
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in time bomb attack at Conservative Party Conference, Grand Hotel, Brighton, Sussex, England.

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12 October 1984


Muriel MacLean,   (54) nfNIB
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Injured in time bomb attack at Conservative Party Conference, Grand Hotel, Brighton, Sussex, England. She died 13th November 1984

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12 October 1993


Joseph Reynolds,   (40)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot while travelling in van to work, Sydenham Road, Harbour Estate, Belfast.

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13th September – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

13th September

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

Monday 13 September 1971

Two Loyalists, James Finlay (31) and John Thompson (21), were mortally injured when the bomb they were preparing exploded prematurely in a house in Bann Street, Belfast. Finlay died on 21 September 1971, and Thompson died on 12 October 1971.

Monday 13 September 1976

Following the resignation of Brian Faulkner the Unionist Party of Northern Ireland (UPNI) elected Anne Dickson as its new leader.

[Dickson became the first woman to lead a political party in Ireland.]

Tuesday 14 September 1976

‘Blanket Protest’ Began

Kieran Nugent was the first prisoner to be sentenced under the new prison regime introduced on 1 March 1976 which meant that he would not receive special category status. Nugent was sent to the new ‘H-Blocks’ of the Maze Prison where he refused to wear prison clothes choosing instead to wrap a blanket around himself.

[This marked the beginning of the ‘Blanket Protest’. This protest was to culminate in the hunger strikes of 1981 when 10 Republican prisoners died. Eventually many of the elements of special category status such as, no uniforms, free association and no prison work, were conceded to paramilitary prisoners.]

Sunday 13 September 1981

Humphrey Atkins, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, was appointed as deputy Foreign Secretary. James Prior was appointed by the British government to take over the post of Secretary of State. [ 1981 Hunger Strike.]

Tuesday 13 September 1983

James Prior, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, defended the use of evidence supplied by ‘supergrasses’.

Friday 14 September 1990

There was a meeting of the Anglo-Irish Intergovernmental Conference (AIIC) in Dublin.

Friday 13 September 1991

The Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF), a cover name (pseudonym) used by the Ulster Defence Association (UDA), planted two bombs planted in Catholic areas. The devices were defused by the British Army. The Anglo-Irish Intergovernmental Conference (AIIC) held a meeting at Stormont in Belfast.

Tuesday 13 September 1994

There were sectarian clashes outside Crumlin Road Courthouse, Belfast, which were connected to a case being heard at the time. Later in the evening there was serious rioting in Loyalist areas of Belfast. Shots were fired, and petrol bombs were thrown, at the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC).

Friday 13 September 1996

British Government Ministers were reportedly warned that the Irish Republican Army (IRA) were ready to launch a renewed bombing campaign in Britain.

Saturday 13 September 1997

The Executive Council of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) held a meeting to decide its position on entering the resumed multi-party talks on 15 September 1997. However the meeting did not arrive at a decision and the matter was postponed to a further meeting on the morning of 15 September 1997. Loyalists held a parade on the Shankill Road with 70 bands taking part. Four members of the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) appeared during the parade and posed with weapons before slipping away into the crowd.

Monday 13 September 1999

The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) executive set up a committee to devise an alternative to the Patten proposals for policing in Northern Ireland. David Trimble, then leader of the UUP, dismissed threats to his leadership and said his party would continue to be involved in the Mitchell Review of the Good Friday Agreement. A survey of public opinion in Northern Ireland found that of those questioned 69 per cent of Catholics approved of the proposals in the Patten report while 65 per cent of Protestants disapproved. The survey was conducted by Ulster Marketing Surveys.

Thursday 13 September 2001

The British Army had to deal with a pipe-bomb that had been discovered found at Carrowdore near Newtownards, County Down. Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) officers discovered a gun, ammunition, a telescopic sight, and bomb-making parts in a hedge on the Knockagh Road in Monkstown, County Antrim.

The Loyalist protest at the Holy Cross Girls’ Primary School followed the pattern of earlier in the week. The Northern Ireland Assembly met to discuss the motion: “This Assembly condemns the shocking and inhuman acts of terrorism carried out in the United States of America on Tuesday and, on behalf of the people of Northern Ireland, extends its sympathy to the government and people of America and all who have suffered so grievously.” The motion was a joint one submitted by Reg Empey (Sir), then Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) Minster of Development and Enterprise, and Seamus Mallon, then Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) deputy First Minister.

Empey and Mallon described the attacks as “shocking and inhuman acts”. The motion was passed unanimously. However, during the debate Ian Paisley, then leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), led his party members out of the chamber when Gerry Adams, then President of Sinn Féin (SF), rose to speak. Iain Duncan Smith was elected leader of the Conservative Party. Quentin Davies of the Conservative Party was appointed the new shadow spokesman for Northern Ireland.


Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the follow  people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live  forever

– To  the Paramilitaries  –

“There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

  7 People lost their lives on the 13th September  between 1972 – 1993

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13 September 1972


Patrick Doyle,  (19)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Son of publican. Shot in Divis Castle Bar, Springfield Road, Belfast.

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13 September 1972


Robert Warnock,  (18)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Association (UDA),

Killed by: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC)
Shot by off duty Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) member during attempted armed robbery at Hillfoot Bar, Glen Road, Castlereagh, Belfast.

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13 September 1975


Leo Norney,  (17)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot while walking along Shepherd’s Path, near Turf Lodge, Belfast.

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13 September 1977
Robin Smyrl,  (26)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Shot while driving to his workplace, Gortin, County Tyrone.

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13 September 1978
Williams Crawford,  (17)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Died five days after being shot, during gun attack on Lawnbrook Social Club, Centurion Street, Shankill, Belfast. Intention to scare the patrons, after earlier fracas at the social club.

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13 September 1991


Kevin Flood,  (31)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot from passing car while standing outside his home, Ligoniel Road, Ligoniel, Belfast.

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13 September 1993
Vernon Bailie,  (41)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Red Hand Commando (RHC)
Shot outside his girlfriend’s home, Johnston Park, Carrowdore, near Newtownards, County Down

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See: 14th September

Main source CAIN Web Service

Major Events in the Troubles