Tag Archives: James McKee

14th April – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

                                                                                           14th April   

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Friday 14 April 1972

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) exploded 23 bombs at locations all over Northern Ireland.

[Public Records 1972 – Released 1 January 2003: Current Situation Report No 118 by A.W.Stephens, then Head of Defence Secretariat 10 at the Ministry of Defence, providing details of security incidents during the previous 24 hours in Northern Ireland.]

Wednesday 14 April 1982

The Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) carried out a raid on the Ulster Defence Association (UDA) headquarters in Belfast.

The raid uncovered ammunition and gun parts. Four leading members of the UDA were arrested.

[At this time the UDA was not a ‘proscribed’ organisation. It was only declared illegal on 10 August 1992.]

Sunday 14 April 1991

Bishop Desmond Tutu, from South Africa, attended an Anglican conference in Newcastle, County Down. Tutu said that Sinn Féin (SF) should be invited to attend the forthcoming talks on the future of Northern Ireland.

Tuesday 14 April 1992

Michael Newman

A British Army (BA) recruiting sergeant died after being shot by the Irish National Liberation Army (INLA) in Derby, England.

[This was the first killing by the INLA in Britain since March 1979.]

Thursday 14 April 1994

Teresa Clinton

Teresa Clinton (34), a Catholic Civilian, was shot dead by the Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF), a cover name (pseudonym) used by the Ulster Defence Association (UDA), during a gun attack on her home, off Ormeau Road, Belfast.

Her husband had been a former Sinn Féin (SF) election candidate.

The UFF carried out another gun attack and wounded of two Catholic civilians.

The Northern Ireland Office (NIO) offered to clarify, for the benefit of SF, specific points related to the Downing Street Declaration (DSD).

Friday 14 April 1995

The Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) discovered 40 weapons and hundreds of rounds of ammunition which were believed to belong to the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF). The cache was found in Holywood, County Down.

[Three men were arrested following the discovery. A second cache of arms was later found in the town.]

Monday 14 April 1997

There was an arson attack on St Peter’s Catholic church in Stoneyford, County Antrim. The chapel was badly damaged by the fire.

A man (24) was seriously injured in what was believed to be a Loyalist ‘punishment’ shooting that took place in the Ballysally estate in Coleraine, County Derry.

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) was believed to be responsible for a ‘punishment’ beating attack on a man in Derry. The man subsequently went into hiding.

See Corporal Killings

Patrick Mayhew, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, referred the case of Patrick Kane to the Court of Appeal. Kane had been convicted of, and was serving a life sentence for, the murder of corporals Derek Wood and David Howes on 19 March 1988.

Tuesday 14 April 1998

In the Republic of Ireland the Irish authorities released nine Irish Republican Army (IRA) prisoners from Portlaoise Prison. On their release the prisoners pledged their “total support” for the leadership of Sinn Féin (SF).

[The releases were criticised by Unionists and by the Garda Representative Association.]

Wednesday 14 April 1999

Liz O’Donnell, then Irish Minister of State for Foreign Affairs, acknowledged that the Hillsborough Declaration would not be the basis for resolving the decommissioning impasse.

Saturday 14 April 2001

Bomb Explosion in London

There was a bomb explosion at a Post Office delivery depot in north London at 11.28pm (2328BST).

There had been no warning of the bomb but no one was injured in the explosion which caused “minor” damage to the building at The Hyde in Hendon. The “real” Irish Republican Army (rIRA) was thought to have been responsible for the attack.

 

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

8 People lost their lives on the 14th  April   between 1973– 1994

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14 April 1973


Robert Millen,   (23)

Protestant
Status: Official Irish Republican Army (OIRA),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot from passing car while standing in McClure Street, off Ormeau Road, Belfast

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14 April 1974
Anthony Pollen,  (27)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Undercover British Army (BA) member. Shot while observing Republican Easter commemoration parade, Meenan Square, Bogside, Derry.

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14 April 1975


Stafford Mateer,   (32)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: not known (nk)
Died two days after being shot while driving his car, at the junction of Albertbridge Road and Woodstock Road, Belfast.

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14 April 1978


James McKee,  (61)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Shot while driving school bus, Creggan, near Pomeroy, County Tyrone.

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14 April 1978

Robert McCullough,   (27)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot at his home, Rathmore Drive, Rathcoole, Newtownabbey, County Antrim.

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14 April 1986


White, Keith (20)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC)
Died 15 days after being shot by plastic bullet, during street disturbances, Woodhouse Street, Portadown, County Armagh.

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14 April 1992


Michael Newman,   (34)

nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish National Liberation Army (INLA)
Shot shortly after leaving British Army (BA) recruiting office, Derby, England.

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14 April 1994


Teresa Clinton,  (34)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot during gun attack on her home, Balfour Avenue, off Ormeau Road, Belfast. Her husband a Sinn Fein (SF) member.

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1st September Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

September 1971

Flag_of_the_Ulster_Defence_Association_svg


 A number of Loyalist Defence Associations came together and formed the Ulster Defence Association (UDA).

[The UDA was to quickly become the largest of the Loyalist paramilitary organisations in Northern Ireland. The smaller Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF), which was responsible for many sectarian killings, was considered a cover name for the UDA. Indeed the UDA was a legal organisation between 1971 and 11 August 1992 when it was finally proscribed.]

See: UDA History & Background

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Wednesday 1 September 1971
 The Irish Republican Army (IRA) exploded a series of bombs across Northern Ireland injuring a number of people.

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Monday 1 September 1975

Five Protestant civilians died and seven were injured as a result of an attack on an Orange Hall in Newtownhamilton, County Armagh. Responsibility for the attack was claimed by a group called the South Armagh Republican Action force (SARAF) which was considered by many commentators to be a covername for members of the Irish Republican Army (IRA).

Two members of the Ulster Defence Association (UDA) were killed by the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) in the continuing feud between the two Loyalist paramilitary groups. Denis Mullen (36), then a member of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), was shot dead at his home near Moy, County Tyrone.

Thomas Taylor (50), a Protestant civilian, was shot dead by Republican paramilitaries at his place of work in Donegall Street, Belfast. Another Protestant civilian was shot dead, in a case of mistaken identity, by the UVF at a scrap metal yard near Glengormley, County Antrim. The intended targets were the Catholic owners of the business.

Tuesday 1 September 1981

First Integrated Secondary School Northern Ireland’s first religiously integrated secondary school, Lagan College, opened. [The integrated school movement was mainly driven by the desire of parents to have schools which would provide the opportunity for greater cross community contact amongst young people.]

Wednesday 1 September 1982

The Irish National Liberation Army (INLA) shot and wounded Billy Dickson, then a Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) member of Belfast City Council. A new Department of Economic Development was formed when the merger took place between the Departments of Commerce and Manpower.

[During September unemployment in Northern Ireland increased to 22.3 per cent of the workforce. ]

September 1991

Sunday 1 September 1991

Visit by USA Delegation A delegation of politicians from the United States of America (USA) arrived in Northern Ireland for a fact-finding visit. Tom Foley, then Democrat Party member and Speaker of the House of Representatives, led the delegation. Foley called on Americans not to provide financial support for NORAID (Irish Northern Aid Committee). Foley also refused to meet representatives of Sinn Féin (SF) until it had renounced the use of violence.

Wednesday 1 September 1993

James Bell (49), a Catholic civilian, was shot dead by the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) at his place of work near to the Newtownards Road in east Belfast. James Peacock (44), a prison officer, was shot dead at his home in Belfast by the UVF.

[The UVF later threatened to kill more prison officers unless there were improvements in conditions for Loyalist prisoners. This threat was withdrawn on 10 September 1993.]

  1. The Unionist controlled Belfast City Council voted to ban Mary Robinson, then President of the Republic of Ireland, from entering any council owned property including the City Hall.

Thursday 1 September 1994

John O’Hanlon (32), a Catholic civilian, was shot dead by the Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF), a cover name (pseudonym) used by the Ulster Defence Association (UDA). He was killed outside a friend’s home in Skegoneill Avenue, Skegoneill, north Belfast.

Friday 1 September 1995

An Irish Republican Army (IRA) spokesperson was reported to have said: “There is absolutely no question of any IRA decommissioning at all, either through the back door or the front door”.

[The first act of decommissioning by the IRA happened on 23 October 2001.]

Sunday 1 September 1996

Billy Wright, a leading Loyalist who had been ordered to leave Northern Ireland by the Combined Loyalist Military Command (CLMC) on 28 August 1996, addressed a group of supporters at midnight; the time of the deadline set by the CLMC. A bomb was thrown through the window of the home of Alex Kerr’s parents (Alex Kerr was also under threat from the CLMC but was in police custody at the time of the attack). There were no injuries as a result of the bombing. A series of Orange marches were rerouted in Dunloy, Newry, lower Ormeau Road, Pomeroy, and Strabane.

Monday 1 September 1997

Relatives of three men that were shot dead on 13 January 1990 by undercover soldiers walked out of an inquest in Belfast in protest at the “restricted scope” of the inquiry.

[The three men, Edward Hale (25), John McNeill (43), and Peter Thompson (23), all Catholic civilians, were shot dead during an attempted robbery at Sean Graham’s bookmaker’s shop at the junction of Whiterock Road and Falls Road, Belfast.]

David Trimble, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), held a meeting in Armagh with leaders of the Catholic Church. The meeting was part of a consultation process that the UUP engaged in to determine whether or not to take part in the Stormont talks. Trimble said later that the UUP would not meet Sinn Féin (SF) face-to-face. It was announced that the new head of the Civil Service in Northern Ireland would be John Semple.

Tuesday 1 September 1998

Gerry Adams, then President of Sinn Féin (SF), announced in a statement that: “Sinn Féin believe the violence we have seen must be for all of us now a thing of the past, over, done with and gone.” David Trimble in his role as First Minister Designate, invited Gerry Adams to a round-table meeting.

[These developments came in advance of the arrival of Bill Clinton, then President of the United States of America (USA), on a visit to Northern Ireland on 3 September 1998.]

In an interview the Irish Republican Army (IRA) said that it would not decommission its weapons and claimed that Unionists were using the issue to try to re-negotiate the Good Friday Agreement. The interview was given to ‘An Phoblacht / Republican News’ and was published in full on Thursday 3 September 1998 in the paper. In addition the IRA said that it would do all in its power to help the relatives of people who had disappeared during the conflict. John Bruton, then leader of Fine Gael (FG), said the statement by the IRA on decommissioning made it unthinkable that politicians associated with it could take part in an Executive. The Garda Síochána (the Irish police) established a special unit to investigate malicious calls to the families of two young Buncrana boys killed in the Omagh bombing

Saturday 1 September 2001

The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) held a meeting of its 120 member executive to decide its response to the ‘Patten Report – Updated Implementation Plan 2001’ that was issued on 17 August 2001. The meeting unanimously supported a motion outlining: “the leader’s determination to resolve satisfactorily with the Secretary of State a number of fundamental issues regarding the Policing Board and the police implementation plan before any further decision is given by the Ulster Unionist Party to nominating members to the Policing Board”. In an interview with the BBC David Ervine, then leader of the Progressive Unionist Party (PUP), suggested that individual members of the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) may have been responsible for the attempted car bomb attack on the Auld Lammas Fair in Ballycastle, County Antrim, on 28 August 2001.


Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the follow  people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To  the Paramilitaries  –

“There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.


 14 People lost their lives on the 1st September between 1973 – 1994

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01 September 1973
Anne Marie Petticrew,   (19)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died nine days after being injured in premature bomb explosion in house, Elaine Street, Stranmillis, Belfast

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01 September 1975

Denis Mullen,   (36)

Catholic
Status: Civilian Political Activist (CivPA),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) member. Shot at his home, Collegeland, near Moy, County Armagh.

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01 September 1975
Thomas Taylor,  (50)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Republican group (REP)
Found shot at his TV repair shop, Donegall Street, Belfast.

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01 September 1975

James McKee,   (70)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Republican Action Force (RepAF)
Shot during gun attack on Tullyvallen Orange Hall, Newtownhamilton, County Armagh.

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01 September 1975
Ronald McKee,   (40)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Republican Action Force (RepAF)
Shot during gun attack on Tullyvallen Orange Hall, Newtownhamilton, County Armagh.

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01 September 1975
John Johnston,  (80)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Republican Action Force (RepAF)
Shot during gun attack on Tullyvallen Orange Hall, Newtownhamilton, County Armagh.

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01 September 1975
Nevin McConnell,   (40)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Republican Action Force (RepAF)
Shot during gun attack on Tullyvallen Orange Hall, Newtownhamilton, County Armagh.

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01 September 1975


William Herron,  (63)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Republican Action Force (RepAF)
Shot during gun attack on Tullyvallen Orange Hall, Newtownhamilton, County Armagh. He died 3 September 1975

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01 September 1975
Leslie Shepherd,  (24)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot at scrapyard, Lisnalinchy, near Glengormley, County Antrim. Catholic owners of the scrapyard were the intended targets.

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01 September 1979
Gerry Lennon,  (23)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot at his workplace, a shop, Antrim Road, Belfast.

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01 September 1987
Eamon Maguire,  (33)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Found shot, Conalig, near Cullaville, County Armagh. Alleged informer.

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01 September 1993


 James Bell,   (49)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot at his workplace, Riada Factory, Chadolly Street, off Newtownards

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01 September 1993


James Peacock,   (44)

Protestant
Status: Prison Officer (PO),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Off duty. Shot at his home, Joanmount Park, Ballysillan, Belfast

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01 September 1994


John O’Hanlon,  (32)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot, outside friends home, Skegoneill Avenue, Skegoneill, Belfast.

Main source CAIN Web Service


See: UDA History & Background