29th June – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

29th June

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Wednesday 29 June 1977

Two members of the British Army were shot dead by Irish Republican Army (IRA) snipers at the entrance to North Howard Street Army base, Belfast.

Monday 29 June 1981

Laurence McKeown, then an Irish Republican Army (IRA) prisoner, joined the hunger strike.

hungry strikes

See 1981 Hunger Strike

Saturday 29 June 1985

Patrick Magee was charged in a London court with the murder of those killed in the Brighton bombing on 12 October 1984.

[Magee was found guilty of conspiring to cause explosions in Britain on 11 June 1986 and received eight life sentences.]

Wednesday 29 June 1988

The Northern Ireland Police Authority (NIPA) decided, by one vote, not to recommend action against John Hermon, then Chief Constable of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC), and two other senior officers.

Saturday 29 June 1991

Cecil McKnight, then a Ulster Democratic Party member and a former senior member of the Ulster Defence Association (UDA), was shot dead by the Irish Republican Army (IRA) at his home in Derry.

Eddie Fullerton

[The IRA claimed that McKnight had been involved in the planning of the killing of Eddie Fullerton on 25 May 1991.]

An alleged informer was shot dead by the Irish National Liberation Army (INLA) in Belfast.

The Queen paid a visit to Northern Ireland and presented ‘colours’ to four Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR) battalions.

[On 23 July 1991 it was announced that the UDR would be merged with the Royal Irish Rangers (RIR).]

The Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) rerouted an Orange Order parade that was seeking to pass through the Nationalist lower Ormeau Road area in Belfast.

Monday 29 June 1998

The Parades Commission announced that it would not permit the Drumcree march by the Orange Order to use the return route along the mainly Nationalist Garvaghy Road unless there was, what it termed, a “local agreement”.

The Secretary of State published a ‘Decommissioning Scheme‘  which made provision for the decommissioning of weapons by paramilitary groups.

In a surprise development John Alderdice announced his resignation as leader of the Alliance Party of Northern Ireland (APNI).

[Alderdice made the move to allow him to stand as ‘Presiding Officer’ (Speaker) of the new Northern Ireland Assembly. It later transpired that the post was originally to have gone to Seamus Close, then deputy leader

Tuesday 29 June 1999

Although the British and Irish governments gave an upbeat assessment, spokespersons for the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) and Sinn Féin (SF) were cautious about the degree of progress that had been made in the multi-party talks at Stormont.

[Official sources suggested substantial progress had been made in the talks. SF was said to have hardened its verbal commitment to the principle of decommissioning and to using its influence to persuade the IRA to dispose of weapons in the context of the full implementation of the Good Friday Agreement.]

jeanmcconville2

After 30 days of searching, Garda Síochána (the Irish police) uncovered the remains of two of the ‘disappeared’ believed to be those of John McClory (17) and Brian McKinney (22) in a bog in County Monaghan.

See The Disappeared

Both of the men had been abducted on 25 May 1978 and were shot some time later by the Irish Republican Army (IRA) for allegedly stealing weapons.

Friday 29 June 2001

The Loyalist blockade of the road to the Catholic Holy Cross Girls’ Primary School in Ardoyne, north Belfast, continued on the last day of the school term. Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) officers again prevented children and parents from attempting to enter the school through the front gate.

[The Loyalist blockade of the school had begun on 19 June 2001 and resumed when the school opened for the new term on Monday 3 September 2001.]

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

7  People lost their lives on the 29th  June between 1970 – 1993

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29 June 1970


 Henry McIlhone  (33)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died two days after being shot during street disturbances, while in the grounds of St Matthew’s Church, Short Strand, Belfast

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29 June 1973


Sean Armstrong  (31)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Shot at his home, Eglantine Avenue, Malone, Belfast.

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29 June 1977
Richard Turnbull  (18)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by snipers while on British Army (BA) mobile patrol at the entrance to North Howard Street British Army (BA) base, Lower Falls, Belfast.

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29 June 1977
Michael Harrison   (19)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by snipers while on British Army (BA) mobile patrol at the entrance to North Howard Street British Army (BA) base, Lower Falls, Belfast.

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29 June 1991


Gerard Burns   (37)

Catholic
Status: Irish National Liberation Army (INLA),

Killed by: Irish National Liberation Army (INLA)
Found shot at the back of house, New Barnsley Park, Ballymurphy, Belfast. Alleged informer.

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29 June 1991


Cecil McKnight  (32)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Association (UDA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Also Ulster Democratic Party (UDP) member. Shot at his home, Melrose Terrace, Waterside, Derry.

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29 June 1993


Brian McCallum  (26)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Died three days after being injured when grenade he was handling exploded prematurely, Ainsworth Avenue, Woodvale, Belfast.

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