13th March – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

13th March

Monday 13 March 1972

[Public Records 1972 – Released 1 January 2003:

A Letter from Sir Alec Douglas-Home, then Foreign Secretary, to Edward Heath, then Prime Minister. The letter sets out Douglas-Home’s opposition to Direct Rule and a preference for a United Ireland.]

Wednesday 13 March 1974

Liam Cosgrave, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), made a statement in the Dáil in which he said that the position of Northern Ireland within the United Kingdom could not be changed except with the consent of a majority of the people of Northern Ireland.

Thursday 13 March 1975

Two people died as a result of a Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) gun and bomb attack on Conway’s Bar, Greencastle, Belfast.

One of those killed was a Catholic civilian, and the other was a member of the UVF who died when the bomb he was planting in the pub exploded prematurely. A Catholic civilian died three weeks after been shot by Loyalists in Belfast.

Thursday 13 March 1986

It was announced that additional British Army soldiers would be sent to Northern Ireland to support the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC).

The move was the result of Unionist protests against the Anglo-Irish Agreement (AIA).

In the High Court in Glasgow, Scotland, two men were sentenced to eight years’ imprisonment for attempting to acquire arms for the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF).

Tuesday 13 March 1990

The Irish Supreme Court upheld the appeal of Dermot Finucane and James Clarke against extradition to Northern Ireland. The two men had escaped from the Maze Prison, Northern Ireland, on 25 September 1983. The decision caused uproar among Unionist politicians and the British Government

Wednesday 13 March 1991

An opinion poll carried out for The Guardian (a British newspaper) by International Communications and Marketing showed that 43 per cent of people were in support of the withdrawal of the British Army from Northern Ireland.

Of those questioned, 43 per cent were in favour of the reunification of Ireland, while 30 per cent wanted Northern Ireland to remain part of the United Kingdom (UK).

Friday 13 March 1992

The Garda Síochána (the Irish police) uncovered a number of weapons at County Donegal, Republic of Ireland.

Sunday 13 March 1994

Third IRA Mortar Attack on Heathrow

Heathrow Airport was closed for two hours following a third Irish Republican Army (IRA) mortar attack. None of the mortars exploded.

[The mortars had been concealed underground and were fired from a wooded area close to the perimeter fence. There had been two previous attacks on 9 March 1994 and 11 March 1994.]

The leadership of the IRA issued a statement which said that their “positive and flexible” attitude to the peace process was “abiding and enduring”.

Thursday 13 March 1997

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) carried out a bomb attack in the Short Strand area of east Belfast and injured a British soldier and a Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) officer.

Twenty Republicans were warned by the RUC that their names were on a list found in the possession of a man suspected of being a member of the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF).

The man was arrested during an attempted post office robbery in the Village area of Belfast.

The British Home Office announced that Roisín McAliskey, then being held in prison awaiting a decision about extradition, would be allowed to keep her baby in the mother and baby unit of Holloway Prison.

Wednesday 13 March 2002

There was a series of events in the White House, Washington, USA, to mark the celebrations leading to St Patrick’s Day.

The leaders of the three main political parties in Northern Ireland attended, however Ian Paisley, then leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), stayed away from the event because he did not wish to be photographed alongside Gerry Adams, then President of Sinn Féin (SF).

Bertie Ahern, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), presented George Bush, then President of the USA, with a bowl of shamrock. Ahern dismissed comments earlier in the day by David Trimble, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP).

At a morning debate Trimble had renewed his criticism of the Republic of Ireland. He described the recent abortion referendum as “a sectarian exercise” and a “sectarian vote”.

In Northern Ireland the prospect of an agricultural show being held on a Sunday was averted. The Orange Order had threatened “to take every action necessary, regardless of the consequences”, to prevent the 102 year old Ballymena Show being extended into the Sabbath for the first time.

In the face of such opposition the County Antrim Agricultural Association withdrew the proposal. Ken Good (49), the Church of Ireland Archdeacon of Dromore, was appointed as Bishop of Derry and Raphoe. He succeeded James Mehaffey, who retired in January.

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live  forever

– To  the Paramilitaries  –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

13 People   lost their lives on the 13th March between 1972 – 1991

 —————————————————————————

13 March 1972
Patrick McCrory,   (19)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot at his home, Ravenhill Avenue, Belfast.

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13 March 1973
John King,  (22)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by booby trap bomb while on British Army (BA) foot patrol, Coolderry, near Crossmaglen, County Armagh.

 —————————————————————————

13 March 1974


David Farrington,  (23)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot while at British Army (BA) pedestrian check point, Chapel Lane, Belfast

 —————————————————————————

13 March 1975
Marie Doyle,  (38)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot, during gun and bomb attack on Conways Bar, Greencastle, Belfast.

 —————————————————————————

13 March 1975
George Brown,  (22)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Injured in premature explosion during Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) bomb and gun attack on Conways Bar, Greencastle, Belfast. He died 28 April

 —————————————————————————

13 March 1975
Robert Skillen,   (19)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Defence Association (UDA)
Died three weeks after being shot in Parke’s grocery shop, North Queen Street, New Lodge, Belfast.

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13 March 1976
 Alexander Frame,  (26)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF),

Killed by: Ulster Defence Association (UDA)
Found beaten to death, Aberdeen Street, Shankill, Belfast. Ulster Defence Association / Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) feud

 —————————————————————————

13 March 1976


Nicholas White,   (34)

nfNI
Status: ex-British Army (xBA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Youth worker. Shot at youth club, Alliance Avenue, Ardoyne, Belfast.

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13 March 1977
William Brown,   (18)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while on Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) mobile patrol, Ballagh Cross Roads, Donagh, near Lisnaskea, County Fermanagh.

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13 March 1979
Robert McNally,   (20)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish National Liberation Army (INLA)
Off duty. Died seven days after being injured by booby trap bomb attached to his car, which exploded while leaving car park, West Street, Portadown, County Armagh.

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13 March 1984


Ronald Funston,  (28)

Protestant
Status: ex-Ulster Defence Regiment (xUDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot at his farm, Lowery, near Pettigoe, County Fermanagh.

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13 March 1987
John Chambers,  (56)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot while driving lorry, Killowen, near Rostrevor, County Down. Off duty Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR) member intended target.

 —————————————————————————

13 March 1991
Lord Kaberry,  (83)

nfNIB
Status: Civilian Political Activist (CivPA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Former Conservative Member of Parliament. Died 8 months after being injured, in bomb attack on Carlton Club, St James Street, London. Attack occurred on 25 June 1990

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