2nd December – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

2nd December

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Thursday 2 December 1971

A teenage girl died four days after being shot during a gun attack on members of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC).

Tuesday 2 December 1975

Two Protestant civilians were shot dead by Republican paramilitaries in the Dolphin Restaurant, Strand Road, Derry.

Sunday 2 December 1984

Enter a caption

A poster produced by Republicans warning people about the operation of undercover British Army Intelligence units

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An undercover British soldier, believed to be a member of the Special Air Service (SAS), and two members of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) were killed in an exchange of gun fire near Kesh, County Fermanagh.

Wednesday 2 December 1987

James Molyneaux, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), and Ian Paisley, then leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), again met Tom King, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, in an on-going series of ‘talks about talks’.

Monday 2 December 1991

The Anglo-Irish Intergovernmental Conference (AIIC) held a meeting in Dublin, Republic of Ireland. One of the outcomes of the meeting was a suggestion by the AIIC that there should be a single railway authority for the whole of Ireland.

Wednesday 2 December 1992

There was a series of 46 bomb hoaxes in Belfast and Lisburn, County Antrim.

Thursday 2 December 1993

Sinn Féin (SF) publicly released more information on the secret talks between the British government and the Republican Movement. Martin McGuinness, the Vice-President of Sinn Féin (SF), claimed that the British government had begun the contacts in 1990.

Saturday 2 December 1995

It was announced that 600 British soldiers serving with 45 Royal Marine Commando in Fermanagh had left Northern Ireland. The overall troop level in Northern Ireland was reported as being 17,000.

Tuesday 2 December 1997

The Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) announced that all day-time foot patrols by the British Army were to be withdrawn from all parts of Belfast.

George Mitchell, then Chairman of the multi-party talks, said that the negotiations were getting down to “brass tacks”. His comment followed the introduction a system whereby each of the parties would be represented by two delegates, instead of the pervious five, at future discussions. Hugh Smyth, a Progressive Unionist Party (PUP) councillor, said that Sinn Féin (SF) should be given a share of posts on Belfast City Council

Wednesday 2 December 1998

Tony Blair, then British Prime Minister, travelled to Belfast to try to aid the search for a deal on the issue of the setting up of departments and the North-South Ministerial Council. [By the time Blair left a number of commentators felt that agreement had been reached. However, any understanding that may have been reached soon fell apart with the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) being blamed for stalling on the issue.]

Thursday 2 December 1999

New Devolved Government

Direct Rule came to an end as powers were devolved to the Northern Ireland Assembly (NIA).

[Devolution took effect as of midnight on 1 December 1999.]

At a meeting in Dublin at 9.00am the North-South Ministerial Council and the British-Irish Ministerial Council, as set out in the Good Friday Agreement, took effect. At the same time the Anglo-Irish Agreement (AIA) was replaced by the British-Irish Agreement. At 9.20am Articles 2 and 3 of the Irish Constitution were replaced by new Articles. Peter Mandelson, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, made a statement and David Andrews, then Irish Foreign Minister, also made a statement on the developments. At 3.00pm the new Executive of the Northern Ireland Assembly met for the first time. Present at the meeting were representatives of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), and Sinn Féin (SF).

The Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) refused to attend. At 8.30pm the IRA issued a statement indicating that it would appoint a representative to meet the Decommissioning Body chaired by General de Chastelain.

[The new devolved government was suspended on midnight 11 February 2000 and direct rule re-introduced. The suspension covered the Northern Ireland Assembly, Executive, and other Institutions.]

Mary McAleese, then President of the Republic of Ireland, was in London for lunch with the Queen (Elizabeth II).

[There was speculation that the Queen might in the future visit the Republic of Ireland.]

Sunday 2 December 2001

A Catholic man was run down by a car as he stood on a pavement in the North Queen’s Street area of north Belfast. The car involved in the incident was found burnt out in the Loyalist Tigers Bay area. The man received head injuries, was knocked unconscious and was taken to hospital.

Eoin O’Brion, then a Sinn Féin (SF) councillor, said that it was a blatant attempt by Loyalist paramilitaries to murder a Catholic. There were disturbances in the Whitewell area of north Belfast. Catholic residents claimed that a Loyalist gang had attacked their homes. Police moved into the area and made two arrests. Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) officers arrested four men who were travelling by car across the Foyle Bridge in Derry. The police said that several “items” were recovered. The bridge was closed for a while.

There was a special service of thanksgiving for the “service, dedication, sacrifice and leadership” of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC). The service was held at St Anne’s Cathedral in Belfast and led by Robin Eames (Dr), then Archbishop of Armagh.

 

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following  people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live  forever

– To  the Paramilitaries  –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

10  People lost their lives on the 2nd December  between 1972 – 1993

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02 December 1972
Patrick Benstead,  (23)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Found shot in entry, off Crossley Street, Belfast.

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02 December 1972
Sandra Meli,   (26)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Shot at her home, Flora Street, off Beersbridge Road, Belfast. Her Catholic husband was the intended target.

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02 December 1974
John Maddocks,  (32)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by booby trap bomb hidden in milk churn left in field, while on British Army (BA) foot patrol, Gortmullan, near Derrylin, County Fermanagh.

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02 December 1975
Charles McNaul,  (55)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish National Liberation Army (INLA)
Shot while sitting in Dolphin Restaurant, Strand Road, Derry.

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02 December 1975
Alexander Mitchell,  (46)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish National Liberation Army (INLA)
Shot while sitting in Dolphin Restaurant, Strand Road, Derry.

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02 December 1982
James Gibson,   (50)

Protestant
Status: ex-Ulster Defence Regiment (xUDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot while driving school bus, which had stopped to let passengers alight, Annaghmore, near Coalisland, County Tyrone.

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02 December 1984
Alistair Slater,   (28)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot during gun battle between undercover British Army (BA) unit and Irish Republican Army (IRA) unit, Drumrush, near Kesh, County Fermanagh.

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02 December 1984
Antoine MacGiolla Bhrighde,   (27)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot during gun battle between undercover British Army (BA) unit and Irish Republican Army (IRA) unit, Drumrush, near Kesh, County Fermanagh.

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02 December 1984
Kieran Fleming,  (26)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: not known (nk)
Drowned in Bannagh River, near Kesh, County Fermanagh. Escaping from gun battle between undercover British Army (BA) unit and Irish Republican Army (IRA) unit. His body found in the river on 21 December 1984.

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02 December 1993
Paul Garrett,   (23)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper, while on British Army (BA) foot patrol, Victoria Street, Keady, County Armagh.

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