Tag Archives: William Wilson

14th February – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

14th February

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Monday 14 February 1972

Lord Widgery arrived in Coleraine, where the ‘Bloody Sunday’ (30 January 1972) Tribunal was to be based, and held a preliminary hearing. During this initial hearing Widgery announced that the tribunal would be “essentially a fact-finding exercise” and then went on to narrow the terms of reference for the tribunal.

See Bloody Sunday

Wednesday 14 February 1979

There was a meeting between Roy Mason, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, and M. O’Kennedy, then Irish Minister for Foreign Affairs in London.

Tuesday 14 February 1989

John Davey, a Sinn Féin (SF) councillor, was shot dead by Loyalist gunmen near Maghera, County Derry.

Thursday 14 February 1991

Peter Brooke, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, told the House of Commons that there were still differences between the Northern Ireland political parties, the Northern Ireland Office (NIO), and Irish ministers, over the proposals for talks. Charges against Desmond Ellis, who had been extradited from the Republic of Ireland to Britain, were changed when he appeared in court. The introduction of new charges was contrary to Irish law and the incident sparked a row between the two countries.

[The decision was reversed on 4 June 1991 and the original charges reinstated.]

Tuesday 14 February 1995

A delegation from the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) had a meeting with John Major, then British Prime Minister, in London. Following the meeting the UUP wrote to Major to state that the party would not take part in all-party talks based on a “nationalist agenda”.

Friday 14 February 1997

Relatives of those killed on ‘Bloody Sunday’ met with Patrick Mayhew, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, to put the case for a fresh inquiry in the events of 30 January 1972.

Sunday 14 February 1999

Bertie Ahern, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), was involved in controversy after making apparently contradictory statements about the decommissioning of IRA arms. In an interview with The Sunday Times (a London based newspaper) Ahern indicated that the Northern Ireland Executive could not be established without a start to decommissioning. Later, he said Sinn Féin (SF) should not be barred from the Executive in the absence of decommissioning. The President, Mrs McAleese, met the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr George Carey, for the first time in Rome.

Sunday 14 February 1999

A pipe-bomb was thrown at a house, Graymount, north Belfast.

 

Thursday 14 February 2002

Police uncovered a pipe-bomb, and components parts for another two devices, during a search of houses in Ballymena, County Antrim. A sawn-off shotgun and automatic pistol were also found. There were no arrests.

During other searches in the Clogh area of County Antrim, shotgun cartridges and other ammunition were found. Again there were no arrests.

A Sinn Féin (SF) spokesperson said that the party’s four Members of Parliament (MPs) had already begun to complete the House of Commons register of members’ interests before a committee had ruled that the register would have to be completed. The previous rule had only applied to those MPs who were taking their seats at Westminster.

See Omagh Bomb

The Police Association, which represents all the members of the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI), launched a legal action in the High Court in Belfast to attempt to quash the report by the Police Ombudsman on the Omagh bomb investigation. The Ombudsman report was critical of the handling of the investigation by the Chief Constable. The Omagh Victims’ Group said they welcomed the possibility that Ronnie Flanagan, then Chief Constable of the PSNI, may retire at the end of February 2002.

Charles, then Prince of Wales, arrived in Dublin on for his second official visit to the Republic. He met with Mary McAleese, then President of the Republic of Ireland, and Bertie Ahern, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister).

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following  people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live  forever

– To  the Paramilitaries  –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

6 People   lost their lives on the 14th February  between  1973– 1989

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14 February 1973
Edwin Weston,  (20)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while on British Army (BA) foot patrol, Divis Street, Lower Falls, Belfast.

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14 February 1976


Anthony Doherty,   (14)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: not known (nk)
Killed by exploding petrol tank of burning hijacked lorry, during street disturbances, Leeson Street, Lower Falls, Belfast.

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14 February 1976
William Wilson,   (57)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Republican group (REP)
Died one month after being injured during bomb attack on his home, Fortwilliam Parade, Skegoneill, Belfast. He was wounded on 17 January 1976.

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14 February 1979


Steven Kirby,   (22)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while on British Army (BA) foot patrol, Abercorn Road, Derry.

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14 February 1980
John Morrow,   (37)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Shot shortly after leaving Hatfield Bar, Ormeau Road, Belfast.

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14 February 1989


John Davey,   (61)

Catholic
Status: Civilian Political Activist (CivPA),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Sinn Fein (SF) Councillor. Shot as he drove his car into the laneway of his home, Gulladuff, near Maghera, County Derry.

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17th December – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

17th December

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Tuesday 17 December 1974

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) placed three time bombs at telephone exchanges in London. In one of the explosions George Arthur (34), a post office telephonist, was killed.

Sunday 17 December 1978

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) carried out a series of bomb attacks on cities in England. Bombs exploded in Bristol, Coventry, Liverpool, Manchester, and Southampton.

Wednesday 17 December 1980

Tomás Ó Fiaich, then Catholic Primate of Ireland, called on the hunger strikers to call off their strike. He also appealed to Margaret Thatcher, then British Prime Minister, to intervene personally in the protest.

Friday 17 December 1982

The Michelin company announced that it was to close its factory at Mallusk, County Antrim, with the loss of over 2,000 jobs.

Saturday 17 December 1983

Three members of the British police and three civilians were killed as a result of an Irish Republican Army (IRA) bomb attack on Harrod’s store, Brompton Road, London. Approximately 90 people were also injured as a result of the blast. [The IRA later issued a statement claiming that the attack had not been authorised by the Army Council and that it regretted the deaths.] A member of the Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR) was shot dead by the IRA in County Derry.

See Harrod’s Bombing

Friday 14 December 1984

First Soldier Convicted of Murder Ian Thain, a Private in the British Army, was convicted of murdering a civilian.

[He was the first British soldier to be convicted of murder during the course of the conflict. Thain was released in January 1987 and allowed to rejoin his regiment and resume active service.]

Tuesday 17 December 1985

Unionist MPs Resign All 15 Unionist Members of Parliament (MPs) resigned their seats in protest at the Anglo-Irish Agreement (AIA). Their intention was to highlight opposition to the Agreement in Northern Ireland during the by-elections that would be caused.

Sunday 17 December 1989

James Molyneaux, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), denied that he had ended the UUP boycott of ministers.

Thursday 17 December 1992

Louis Blom-Cooper (Sir), then a Queen’s Council (QC), was appointed to oversee conditions at the three holding centres where people suspected of paramilitary crimes were questioned.

Sunday 17 December 1995

The International Body on Arms Decommissioning travelled to Dublin and met a number of the Irish political parties.

Tuesday 17 December 1996

John Major, then British Prime Minister, began a two day visit to Northern Ireland. Michael Howard, then British Home Secretary, refused to allow the cases of 14 people convicted on Irish Republican Army (IRA) related offences to be reopened. This was despite indications that forensic evidence used against those convicted could have been contaminated.

John Bruton, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), met with Bill Clinton, then President of the United States of America (USA), in Washington. In a statement both men said that they were in favour of a swift entry to the Stormont talks for Sinn Féin (SF) if there was an IRA ceasefire.

Thursday 17 December 1998

The Orange Volunteers (OV) claimed responsibility for a blast-bomb attack on a public house in Crumlin, County Antrim.

[The attack was later also claimed by the Red Hand Defenders (RHD).]

Danny McNamee won an appeal against his conviction for the Hyde Park bombing in July 1982. The court decided the conviction was unsafe.

Friday 17 December 1999

The Inaugural Summit Meeting of the British-Irish Council took place in London and a Joint Communiqué was issued. The British-Irish Council is made up of representatives of: the British government, the Irish government, the Northern Ireland Assembly, the Welsh Assembly, the Scottish Parliament, and the institutions of the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands.

The British-Irish Council decided to look at the topics of transport, social exclusion, the environment, illegal drugs, and ‘society’. Five men, alleged to be members of the Ulster Defence Association (UDA) were found guilty of shooting and beating two Catholic brothers in their home in July 1999.

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following  people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live  forever

– To  the Paramilitaries  –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

10  people   lost their lives on the 17th December between 1974  -1984

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17 December 1974
George Arthur,  (35)

nfNIB
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in bomb attack on Bloomsbury telephone exchange, off Tottenham Court Road, London.

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17 December 1979
William Wilson,   (58)

Protestant
Status: Prison Officer (PO),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Shot outside Buffs Social Club, Century Street, off Crumlin Road, Belfast

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17 December 1983


Brown McKeown,   (40)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Shot at his workplace, shop, Maghera, County Derry.

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17 December 1983
Noel Lane,  (28)

nfNIB
Status: British Police (BP),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by car bomb which exploded outside Harrod’s Department Store, Brompton Road, Knightsbridge, London. Inadequate warning given.

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17 December 1983
Jane Arbuthnot,   (22)

nfNIB
Status: British Police (BP),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by car bomb which exploded outside Harrod’s Department Store, Brompton Road, Knightsbridge, London. Inadequate warning given.

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17 December 1983
Philip Geddes,   (24)

nfNIB
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by car bomb which exploded outside Harrod’s Department Store, Brompton Road, Knightsbridge, London. Inadequate warning given.

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17 December 1983
Kenneth Salvesan,   (28)

nfNIB
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by car bomb which exploded outside Harrod’s Department Store, Brompton Road, Knightsbridge, London. Inadequate warning given.

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17 December 1983
Jasmin Cochrane-Patrick,   (25)

nfNIB
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by car bomb which exploded outside Harrod’s Department StoreBrompton Road, Knightsbridge, London. Inadequate warning given

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17 December 1983
Stephen Dodd,   (34)

nfNIB
Status: British Police (BP),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Injured by car bomb which exploded outside Harrod’s Department Store, Brompton Road, Knightsbridge, London. Inadequate warning given. He died 24 December 1983

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17 December 1984
Sean McIlvenna,  (33)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC)
Shot while running across field, shortly after being involved in an Irish Republican Army (IRA) land mine attack on Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR) mobile patrol, off Lisbofin Road, Mullanary, near Blackwatertown, County Armagh.

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