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22nd September – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

22nd September

Monday 22 September 1975

There was a series of bomb attacks on towns across Northern Ireland. [The Irish Republican Army (IRA) claimed responsibility for some of the attacks thus putting further strain on the truce. Many commentators considered that the truce was effectively over by this time.]

Friday 22 September 1978

Roy Mason, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, and Airey Neave, then Conservative Party spokesperson on Northern Ireland, issued statements rebuffing call in Britain for a British withdrawal from Northern Ireland.

Monday 24 September 1984

Oliver Napier resigned as leader of the Alliance Party of Northern Ireland (APNI). His successor was John Cushnahan

Friday 22 September 1989 Deal Bombing

See Deal Bombing

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) exploded a bomb in Deal Barracks (‘The Depot’), Kent, England, which killed ten musicans who were part of the staff band of the Royal Marines .

[Another Royal Marines musican died on 18 October 1989 from wounds received in the bombing.] The explosion occured at 8.22am in the concert hall on Canada Road which formed part of the Royal Marines’ School of Music.

Sunday 22 September 1991

About 50 Republican prisoners rioted in Crumlin Road Jail, Belfast, and tried to barricade off part of the prison. [The Northern Ireland Office (NIO) said that the disturbances by Republican and Loyalist prisoners was part of a deliberate campaign to force the prison authorities to introduce segregation.]

Wednesday 22 September 1993

David Trimble, then a Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) MP, criticised the Hume-Adams Initiative as: “misconceived and bound to fail”.

Thursday 22 September 1994

A man (18) had a leg broken during a paramilitary ‘punishment’ attack in Derry.

[It was thought that the Irish Republican Army (IRA) was responsible for beating the man.]

John Major, then British Prime Minister, who was on a visit to Pretoria, said that there would be no amnesty for paramilitary prisoners. Patrick Mayhew, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, announced the opening of a further six cross-border roads. Semtex explosives together with detonators were found following a search at Whitemoor Prison, Cambridgeshire, England. Al Gore, then United States Vice-President, had a meeting with a delegation of Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) members in Washington.

Friday 22 September 1995

Loyalists clashed with Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) officers following a decision to reroute an Orange Order parade in Downpatrick, County Down. David Trimble, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), proposed the establishment of a new Northern Ireland assembly. The proposal was made to coincide with the 90th anniversary of the Ulster Unionist Council (UUC).

Tuesday 22 September 1998

David Trimble, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), travelled to Dublin for a meeting with Bertie Ahern, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister). The main item on the agenda was the issue of the decommissioning of paramilitary weapons. There was growing tension in recent days over this issue. Trimble supported a call by Ahern for the Irish Republican Army (IRA) to set out a timetable for decommissioning. Later Trimble said that he wanted to know when the IRA would decommission and stated: “we want to see it begin in a credible way”.

Wednesday 22 September 1999

David Wright had a meeting with Adam Ingram, then Security Minister at the Northern Ireland Office (NIO). Wright discussed concerns over the circumstances of the shooting dead of his son Billy Wright in the Maze prison on 27 December 1997.

Friday 22 September 2000

Dissident Republican paramilitaries fired an ‘anti-tank rocket’ at the headquarters of MI6, the British intelligence agency, in London. The attack caused damage to the building but no injuries. The “real” Irish Republican Army (rIRA) was thought to have been responsible.

Saturday 22 September 2001

Assembly Restored John Reid, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, restored devolved powers to the Northern Ireland Assembly at midnight. There were sectarian clashes in the Tiger’s Bay / North Queen Street area of Belfast. During the disturbances two blast bombs were thrown. There were no injuries.

There was a meeting of the party officers of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP). Following the meeting David Trimble, then leader of the UUP, said that his party would table a motion in the Northern Ireland Assembly to exclude Sinn Féin (SF) ministers from the Executive. Trimble also announced that if the motion failed the UUP would withdraw its ministers from the Executive.

[This move would effectively bring down the power-sharing government. The UUP secured enough signatures to table the motion on 2 October 2001.]


Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the follow  people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live  forever

– To  the Paramilitaries  –

“There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

17 People lost their lives on the 22nd September  between 1972 – 1989

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22 September 1972
William Matthews,   (47)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Found stabbed to death, beside Ballygomartin River, off Glencairn Road, Glencairn, Belfast.

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22 September 1972


Stewart Gardiner, (23) nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while on British Army (BA) foot patrol, Drummuckavall, near Crossmaglen, County Armagh.

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22 September 1973
Jame Brown,   (26)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Found shot, Foyle Road, Derry. Alleged informer.

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22 September 1974


William McCully,  (58)

Protestant
Status: ex-Prison Officer (xPO),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot at his home, Hillmount Gardens, Finaghy, Belfast.

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22 September 1975


Margaret Hale,   (33)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Died two weeks after being injured during gun and bomb attack on McCann’s Bar, Ballyhagan, near Loughgall, County Armagh. She was wounded on 4 September 1975

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22 September 1985
Martin Patten, (18) nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Shot while returning to Ebrington British Army (BA) base, walking along Limavady Road, Waterside, Derry.

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22 September 1989


Trevor Davis,   (39) nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in time bomb attack on Royal Marines base, Deal, Kent, England.

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22 September 1989
Richard Jones,   (27) nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in time bomb attack on Royal Marines base, Deal, Kent, England.

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22 September 1989
David McMillan,   (26) nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in time bomb attack on Royal Marines base, Deal, Kent, England.

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22 September 1989
Mark Petch,  (24) nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in time bomb attack on Royal Marines base, Deal, Kent, England

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22 September 1989
Michael Ball,   (24) nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in time bomb attack on Royal Marines base, Deal, Kent, England.

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22 September 1989
Dean Pavey,  (31) nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in time bomb attack on Royal Marines base, Deal, Kent, England.

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22 September 1989
Timothy Reeves,   (24) nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in time bomb attack on Royal Marines base, Deal, Kent, England.

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22 September 1989
Richard Fice,   (22) nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in time bomb attack on Royal Marines base, Deal, Kent, England.

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22 September 1989
Robert Simmonds,   (34) nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in time bomb attack on Royal Marines base, Deal, Kent, England.

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22 September 1989
John Cleatheroe, (25) nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in time bomb attack on Royal Marines base, Deal, Kent, England.

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22 September 1989
Christopher Nolan,  (21) nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Injured in time bomb attack on Royal Marines base, Deal, Kent, England. He died 18 October 1989.

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Deal Barracks Bombing – 11 Soldiers slaughtered by the IRA. 22nd September 1989

Today is the 26th Anniversary of the

Deal Barracks Bombing

Never Forgotten

The Deal barracks bombing was an attack by the Provisional Irish Republican Army (PIRA) on a Royal Marines barracks in Deal, England. It took place at 8:22 am on 22 September 1989, when the IRA exploded a time bomb at the Royal Marines School of Music building. The building collapsed, killing 11 marines from the Royal Marines Band Service and wounding another 21.

( If you have pictures of the victims I am happy to include in this post)

The Innocent Victims

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22 September 1989


Trevor Davis,   (39) nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in time bomb attack on Royal Marines base, Deal, Kent, England

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22 September 1989


Richard Jones,   (27) nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in time bomb attack on Royal Marines base, Deal, Kent, England.

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22 September 1989


David McMillan,  (26) nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in time bomb attack on Royal Marines base, Deal, Kent, England.

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22 September 1989


Mark Petch,  (24) nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in time bomb attack on Royal Marines base, Deal, Kent, England.

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22 September 1989


Michael Ball,   (24) nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in time bomb attack on Royal Marines base, Deal, Kent, England.

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22 September 1989


Dean Pavey,   (31) nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in time bomb attack on Royal Marines base, Deal, Kent, England.

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22 September 1989


Timothy Reeves,  (24) nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in time bomb attack on Royal Marines base, Deal, Kent, England

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22 September 1989


Richard Fice,   (22) nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in time bomb attack on Royal Marines base, Deal, Kent, England.

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22 September 1989


Robert Simmonds,   (34) nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in time bomb attack on Royal Marines base, Deal, Kent, England

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22 September 1989


John Cleatheroe,  (25) nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in time bomb attack on Royal Marines base, Deal, Kent, England.

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22 September 1989


Christopher Nolan,  (21) nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Injured in time bomb attack on Royal Marines base, Deal, Kent, England. He died 18 October 1989

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Former Colour Sergent Terry Holland Holding his watch that stopped at the time of the Deal Bombings

Background

The Royal Marines School of Music is a professional training centre for musicians of the Royal Marines Band Service, the musical arm of the Royal Navy. It takes students at school-leavers age of 16 and trains them for 32 months to become both professional musicians and battlefield medics.[citation needed] Originally created at Portsmouth in 1930, it moved to Deal in 1950 and in 1989 was still there as part of the Walmer Barracks.[1] Throughout the 1980s, the IRA had been waging a paramilitary campaign against targets in Britain and Northern Ireland with the stated aim of achieving the separation of Northern Ireland from the rest of the United Kingdom.[2] These operations had included an attempt to kill the British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher in 1984 and a similar attack on a military band in London in 1982.

Explosion

At 8:22am on 22 September 1989, a 15 lb (6.8 kg) time bomb detonated in the recreational centre changing room at the Royal Marines School of Music.[3][4][5] The blast destroyed the recreational centre, levelled the three-story accommodation building next to it and caused extensive damage to the rest of the base and nearby civilian homes.[3] The blast was heard several kilometres away, shaking windows in the centre of Deal, and created a large pall of smoke over the town.[3] Most of the personnel who used the building as a barracks had already risen and were practising marching on the parade ground when the blast occurred. These marines witnessed the buildings collapse, and many of the teenaged personnel were in a state of shock for days afterwards.[6]

Some marines had remained behind in the building, and thus received the full force of the explosion. Many were trapped in the rubble for hours and military heavy lifting equipment was needed to clear much of it. Kent Ambulance Service voluntarily agreed to end its industrial strike action to aid those wounded by the blast. Ten marines died at the scene with most trapped in the collapsed building, although one body was later found on the roof of a nearby house.[6] Another 21 were seriously injured and received treatment at hospitals in Deal and Canterbury. One of these men, 21-year-old Christopher Nolan, died of his wounds on 18 October 1989. Three of those killed were buried nearby at the Hamilton Road Cemetery, Deal.

Reactions

Grave of Mark Petch, one of the dead bandsmen

Memorial bandstand at Walmer Green

The IRA claimed responsibility for the bombing, saying it was a continuation of their campaign to rid Northern Ireland of all British troops who had been deployed there since 1969.[6] Many British people were shocked at the attack, carried out on a ceremonial military band whose only military training was geared towards saving lives.[6][7] The public were also shocked by the ages of those killed, as many were new recruits to the School and most of those injured were teenagers.[2]

The British Government also condemned the IRA’s attack. Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher made a statement from Moscow, where she was on an official visit, saying that she was “shocked and extremely sad”.[4] Leader of the opposition, Neil Kinnock, described the attack as an “awful atrocity” and said, “Even the people who say they support what the IRA calls its cause must be sickened by the way in which such death and injury is mercilessly inflicted”.[4]

The Commandant General Royal Marines Lieutenant-General Sir Martin Garrod appeared on television soon after the bombing condemning the bombers as “thugs, extortionists, torturers, murderers and cowards – the scum of the earth”. Further “”We will emerge stronger and more determined than ever before to end and destroy this foul and dark force of evil.”[8]

The base’s security caused controversy as this was partly provided by a private security firm. This arrangement prompted a thorough review of security procedures at all British military bases and the replacement of the firm’s employees at Deal with Royal Marine guards.[4]

One week after the bombing, the staff and students of the School of Music marched through the town of Deal, watched and applauded by thousands of spectators. They maintained gaps in their ranks to mark the positions of those unable to march through death or serious injury.[7] A memorial bandstand was constructed at Walmer Green to the memory of those who “only ever wanted to play music”.[9] A memorial in the Walmer Barracks chapel was destroyed when the building burnt down in 2003, but the site is now a memorial garden.[10] The surviving barracks at Walmer were converted into flats when the base was decommissioned in 1996, and the School of Music is once again based in Portsmouth.[1]

Every year the Royal Marines Band from Portsmouth visit the memorial bandstand in Deal to pay their respects to those who died in the bombing. In July 2009, a memorial concert and re-dedication ceremony was held at the bandstand on Walmer Green, attended by thousands.[11]

No one has ever been arrested or convicted in connection with the Deal bombing.

 

18th August Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

18th August

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

Wednesday 18 August 1971

Eamon Lafferty (20), a member of the Irish Republican Army (IRA), was shot dead by the British Army (BA) during a gun battle in the Creggan area of Derry. Eamon McDevitt (24), a Catholic civilian who was deaf and dumb, was shot dead by the British Army in Strabane, County Tyrone.

Thursday 19 August 1971

bbc news

The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) was accused of political bias by the then British Minister of Defence, Lord Carrington.

[This was the first of many direct and indirect attempts by successive British governments to influence the way the media reported the conflict in Northern Ireland.]

Wednesday 18 August 1976

Brian Faulkner announced that he would be retiring from active political life.

Tuesday 18 August 1992

Jimmy Brown (36), then a member of the Irish People’s Liberation Organisation (IPLO), was shot dead in Belfast at the start of an internal IPLO feud. [It was later revealed that a new group called the Belfast Brigade of the IPLO was responsible for the killing.]

Thursday 18 August 1994

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) left an incendiary device which exploded in a Protestant public house in Belfast.

Martin Cahill (45), who was alleged to be a leading Dublin criminal, was shot dead by the Irish Republican Army (IRA).

He was killed while driving his car, at the junction of Oxford Road and Charleston Road, Ranelagh, Dublin.

[His nickname was ‘The General’ and his life formed the basis of a film of the same name. A second film called ‘Ordinary Decent Criminal’ also was based on aspects of his life.]

Friday 18 August 1995

Sir Hugh Annesley, then Chief Constable of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC), said that he believed Irish Republican Army (IRA) units were active behind the scenes. However, he believed that the IRA ceasefire would hold.

Monday 18 August 1997

In the Student Union building in Queen’s University of Belfast, signs which were in English and Irish were removed. This was in response to a report which claimed that the Irish language alienated Protestant students by causing a “chill factor”.

[The Student Union had a policy of promoting bilingualism.]

13 Republican prisoners serving sentences in Britain had their security status reduced allowing them to be moved from Special Secure Units to main prison accommodation.

Tuesday 18 August 1998 “real” IRA Suspension of Military Actions

The “real” Irish Republican Army (rIRA) announced that “all military operations have been suspended”. The announcement came in a telephone call to the Irish News, a Northern Ireland newspaper, at 11.35 pm and the ‘suspension’ took effect from midnight. Earlier in the day the rIRA had contacted the Dublin office of the Irish News and stated that the organisation was responsible for the Omagh bombing but denied that it had deliberately set out to kill people. During the day people all over Ireland were still coming to terms with the death toll in the Omagh bomb as the first of the funerals took place. Funerals continued for the rest of the week.

Friday 18 August 2000

The Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) defused a pipe-bomb in Cullybackey near Ballymena, County Antrim. Police ruled out a sectarian motive for a pipe-bomb attack in which a woman in her 80’s escaped injury. The device was found by a neighbour on the windowsill of the house at Lowtown Terrace in Cullybackey at about 7.30am. The police said the fuse of the bomb had been lit but it did not explode.

Saturday 18 August 2001

The Ulster Defence Association (UDA) held a parade down the Shankill Road in Belfast. The paramilitary march involved an estimated 15,000 members of the organisation. Around 100 masked members of the Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF), a cover name used by the UDA, together with 16 bands took part in the parade. The event was held to commemorate Jackie Coulter (46) who was shot dead during the Loyalist feud on 21 August 2000.


Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

 Today is the anniversary of the follow  people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To  the Paramilitaries  –

“There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

11 people lost their lives on the 18th August between 1971 – 1994

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 18 August 1971

Eamon Lafferty,   (20)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot during gun battle, Kildrum Gardens, Creggan, Derry

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 18 August 1971


Eamon McDevitt,  (24)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Deaf and dumb man, shot during street disturbances, Fountain Street, Strabane, County Tyrone.

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18 August 1972
Philip Faye,   (21)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Defence Association (UDA)
Shot at his home, Island Street, Belfast.

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18 August 1972
Leonard Layfield,  (24) nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while at British Army (BA) Vehicle Check Point (VCP), junction of Falls Road and Beechmount Avenue, Belfast.

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 18 August 1972
Richard Jones,  (23) nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while on British Army (BA) mobile patrol, Excise Street, off Grosvenor Road, Belfast.

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 18 August 1973

Trevor Holland,   (36)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot from passing car while standing outside cafe, West Street, Edgarstown, Portadown

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18 August 1976
Robert Walker,  (32)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF),

Killed by: Ulster Defence Association (UDA)
Found shot by the side of Flush Road, off Crumlin Road, Belfast. Ulster Defence Association (UDA) / Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) feud.

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 18 August 1988
Michael Laverty,  (32)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot while renovating house, Cliftonville Road, Belfast.

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18 August 1990
Andrew Bogle,  (43)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by booby trap bomb when he entered his workplace, building site, Strabane Road, Castlederg, County Tyrone.

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 18 August 1992

Jimmy Brown,  (36)

Catholic
Status: Irish People’s Liberation Organisation (IPLO),

Killed by: Irish People’s Liberation Organisation Belfast Brigade (IPLOBB)
Shot while sitting in his car, Clonard Street, Lower Falls, Belfast. Internal Irish People’s Liberation Oraganisation (IPLO) feud.

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18 August 1994


Martin Cahill,   (45) nfNIRI
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot, while driving his car, at the junction of Oxford Road and Charleston Road, Ranelagh, Dublin. Alleged criminal.

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