Tag Archives: Patrick Duffy

24th November – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

24th November

————————————-

Monday 24 November 1971

A woman was killed when members of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) carried out an attack on British soldiers in Strabane, County Tyrone. A British Army (BA) bomb-disposal specialist was killed by a bomb in Lurgan, County Armagh.

Friday 24 November 1972

Jack Lynch, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), met Edward Heath, then British Prime Minister, in London to give Irish approval to Attlee’s paper that said new arrangements should be ‘acceptable to and accepted by the Republic of Ireland.’

Wednesday 24 November 1982

‘Shoot to Kill’ Allegation Michael Tighe (17), a Catholic civilian, was shot dead by an undercover Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) unit at a farm in Derrymacash, near Lurgan, County Armagh.

Martin McCauley, a Catholic civilian, was shot and seriously injured in the same incident. Police officers said the two men were armed and they issued a warning before opening fire. McCauley denied that he and Tighe had been armed and said the police opened fire without warning. The police fired 47 shots but none were fired at them.

[The hayshed where the shooting occurred was being used by the Irish Republican Army (IRA) to store weapons and it was believed that the young men had discovered the arms by accident. This shooting, following on from the shooting on 11 November 1982, convinced many Nationalists that the security forces were operating a ‘shoot to kill’ policy.]

[Three years after the incident McCauley was convicted of the possession of three rifles found inside the shed. On 20 May 2014 the Court of Appeal ruled that the conviction was unsafe and was therefore quashed.] There was a General Election in the Republic of Ireland. [When the count was finished a new coalition government of Fine Gael (FG) and the Irish Labour party was elected. Garret FitzGerald became the new Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister).]

Thursday 24 November 1983

Don Tidey, an American supermarket executive, was kidnapped by the Irish Republican Army (IRA). The kidnap took place in Rathfarnham, County Dublin, Republic of Ireland. [Tidey was rescued on 16 December 1983.]

Saturday 24 November 1990

The Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) held their annual conference. The Apprentice Boys of Derry rejected £277,500 from the International Fund for Ireland to cover part of the costs of a heritage centre.

Sunday 24 November 1991

Explosion Inside Crumlin Prison Two Loyalist paramilitary prisoners were killed by an explosion inside Crumlin Road Prison in Belfast. The explosives had been smuggled into the prison, and fabricated into a bomb, by Republican paramilitary prisoners.

Wednesday 24 November 1993

A consignment of arms that was being shipped to the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) was intercepted by British police at Teesport, England. The arms contained 300 assault rifles, thousands of bullets, 4,400 pounds of explosives, and detonators, and had originated in Poland. Representatives of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) held a meeting at Downing Street, London, with John Major, then British Prime Minister.

Thursday 24 November 1994

The two government ministers responsible for tourism in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland launched a joint marketing initiative.

Friday 24 November 1995

There was a referendum in the Republic of Ireland on a change to the constitution. There was a narrow majority, 50.2 per cent, in favour of the right to divorce.

Suday 24 November 1996

A planned march by the Orange Order through the Catholic village of Dunloy was stopped by the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC). Following this RUC decision Loyalists resumed their weekly picket of the Catholic church in Harryville, Ballymena.

Monday 24 November 1997

Marjorie (Mo) Mowlam, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, gave a press conference in Stormont, Belfast, and told journalists that she would like to see “more direct communication between Sinn Féin [SF] and the UUP”

Ian Paisley, then leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), went to Downing Street, London, for a meeting with Tony Blair, then British Prime Minister. Paisley criticised Blair for making concessions to SF and said that the peace process and the Irish Republican Army (IRA) ceasefire were both “a sham

Wednesday 24 November 1999

Peter Mandelson, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, speaking in the House of Commons, Westminster, criticised the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) and accused the party of “breathtaking hypocrisy” for being prepared to take up its two seats on the proposed Executive but not having contributed to the Mitchell Review of the Agreement.

All 860 members of the Ulster Unionist Council (UUC) were sent a letter signed by James Molyneaux, former leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), and Robert Salters, then Grand Master of the Orange Order, urging them to vote against the proposed deal on 27 November 1999. Gerry Adams, then President of Sinn Féin (SF), gave an address to a special meeting of the SF Ard Chomhairle in Dublin and told those present that the proposals from the Mitchell Review were “the historic compromise between Nationalism and Unionism”.

—————————–

 

———————————————————————————

Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following  people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live  forever

– To  the Paramilitaries  –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

9 People lost their lives on the 24th November between 1971 – 1991

————————————————————

24 November 1971


Colin Davies,  (38)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed attempting to defuse bomb left in car showroom, William Street, Lurgan, County Armagh.

————————————————————

24 November 1973


David Roberts,   (25)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in land mine attack on British Army (BA) foot patrol, Carlingford Street, Crossmaglen, County Armagh.

————————————————————

24 November 1973

Michael Marley,   (17)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army Youth Section (IRAF),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot while involved in a bomb attack on a British Army (BA) foot patrol, Divis Flats, Belfast.

————————————————————

24 November 1978


Patrick Duffy,  (50)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot by undercover British Army (BA) members, at arms cache in unoccupied house, Maureen Avenue, off Abercorn Road, Derry.

————————————————————

24 November 1981
Stephen Murphy,   (19)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Died ten days after being shot at his home, Oldpark Avenue, Belfast.

————————————————————

24 November 1982


Michael Tighe,   (17)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC)
Shot by undercover Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) members at farm, Ballynerry Road North, near Lurgan, County Armagh.

————————————————————

24 November 1988


Phelim McNally,   (28)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot during gun attack on the home of his brother, a Sinn Fein (SF) Councillor, Derrycrin Road, Coagh, County Tyrone.

————————————————————

24 November 1991


Robert Skey,  (27)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Association (UDA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed when time bomb exploded in dining hall of ‘C’ wing, Crumlin Road Prison, Belfast.

————————————————————

24 November 1991


Colin Caldwell,   (23)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Injured when time bomb exploded in dining hall of ‘C’ wing, Crumlin Road Prison, Belfast. He died 28 November 1991

————————————————————

5th September – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

5th September

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

Sunday 5 September 1971

The Army Council of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) proposed the idea of a nine county Ulster Assembly (Dáil Uladh) in a set of constitutional proposals which were reported in Republican News on 11 September 1971. The Assembly was to be one of four regional Assemblies covering the whole of any future united Ireland. The fact that the Ulster Assembly would have a Unionist majority was considered as meeting Unionist concerns over being “swamped” in any new Republic.

Friday 5 September 1975

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) exploded a bomb at the Hilton Hotel in London and killed two people and injured a further 63. [It was later established that a 20 minute warning had been given but this was not passed on to the hotel.]

Wednesday 5 September 1979

Margaret Thatcher, then British Prime Minister, and Jack Lynch, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), met in London to discuss security matters.

Sunday 5 September 1982

Brian Smyth (30), who had been a member of the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) until 1978, was shot dead by members of the UVF in Crimea Street, Shankill, Belfast.

[This killing was reported as an internal feud but was a personal grudge between Lenny Murphy, who had been leader of the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) gang known as the ‘Shankill Butchers’, and Smyth to whom Murphy owed money (Dillon, 1990).]

Friday 5 September 1986

A group of politicians from the main Unionist parties advised district councillors to resign on 15 November 1986 (the first anniversary of the Anglo-Irish Agreement; AIA) as a protest against the Agreement and to force the Northern Ireland Office (NIO) to appoint commissioners to run the councils. [Later the councillors themselves decided against mass resignations.]

Saturday 5 September 1987

Eleven Unionist Members of Parliament (MPs) were summoned for their part in demonstrations on 10 and 11 April 1987.

Tuesday 5 September 1995

Tony Kane (29), a Catholic civilian, was shot dead, while sat in his stationary car, St. Agnes Drive, Andersonstown, Belfast. The Irish Republican Army (IRA) was believed to be responsible for the killing.

[It was alleged that Kane was a drugs dealer and this was the reason why he had been killed.]

Irish government officials cancelled a summit meeting planned for 6 September 1995 between John Bruton, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), and John Major, then British Prime Minister. [Irish and British officials had failed to reach agreement on the need for a commission to oversee the decommissioning of paramilitary weapons.

Saturday 5 September 1998

Seán McGrath (61) who had been injured in the Omagh bombing on 15 August 1998, died as a result of his injuries bringing the total of those killed to 29. David Trimble, then First Minister designate and leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), repeated his view that decommissioning of Irish Republican Army (IRA) weapons was necessary before the UUP would enter an Executive with Sinn Féin (SF).

Gerry Adams, then President of Sinn Féin (SF), said that there was nothing in the Good Friday Agreement that prevented the immediate establishment of an Executive which would include SF members as of right. President Clinton left Ireland from Shannon Airport after what he considered to be a successful visit. The President was conferred with the Freedom of Limerick and in his acceptance speech he said the United States would support Irish people in the path to peace. Earlier in the day he had played a round of golf at Ballybunnion in Kerry with, amongst others, Dick Spring, the former Tánaiste (deputy Irish Prime Minister and Minister for Foreign Affairs).

Wednesday 5 September 2001

Loyalists threw a blast bomb towards Catholic children and their parents as they were attempting to enter the Holy Cross Girls’ Primary School on the Ardoyne Road in north Belfast. There was panic as the device exploded.

Four Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) officers were injured by the blast and a woman collapsed with shock. All were taken to hospital.

The Red Hand Defenders (RHD), a cover name that has been used by members of the Ulster Defence Association (UDA), said it was responsible for the attack.

[This was the third day of the current round of Loyalist protest at the school.]

Later in the evening Protestant residents and Catholic parents held separate meetings to discuss the dispute. The RUC released figures on the rioting overnight. In the 24 hours up to 5.00am (0500BST) 41 RUC officers and two members of the British army had been injured. Fifteen blast bombs and 250 petrol bombs were thrown, and four civilian cars were damaged. An articulated lorry was hijacked by two gunmen on the main bypass road at Newry, County Down, at approximately 12.15am (0015BST). The vehicle was placed across the road and set on fire.


Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the follow  people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To  the Paramilitaries  –

“There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

9 People lost their lives on the 5th September  between 1972 – 1995

————————————————————–

05 September 1972
Victor Smyth,  (54)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: not known (nk)
Off duty. Killed in car bomb explosion outside McGurk’s Bar, Bridge Street, Portadown, County Armagh. Driving past at the time of the explosion.

————————————————————–

05 September 1973
Patrick Duffy,   (21)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by booby trap bomb when he drove tractor into field, Greaghnagleragh, near Belcoo, County Fermanagh.

————————————————————–

05 September 1975
Robert Lloyd,   (-9) nfNIB
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed during bomb explosion in foyer of Hilton Hotel, London. Inadequate warning given.

————————————————————–

05 September 1975
Grace Loohuis,   (-9) nfNIB
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed during bomb explosion in foyer of Hilton Hotel, London. Inadequate warning given.

————————————————————–

05 September 1978
William McAlpine,   (46)

Protestant
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Part-time Cadet Force Officer. Shot while driving his car, near to his home, Chapel Street, Newry, County Down.

————————————————————–

05 September 1981
Sohan Virdee,   (20) nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Shot shortly after being lured to house

————————————————————–

05 September 1982


Brian Smyth,   (30)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot while sitting in stationary car, from passing motorcycle, Crimea Street, Shankill, Belfast. Internal Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) dispute.

————————————————————–

05 September 1992
Samual Rice,   (29)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot while in relative’s home, Solway Street, off Newtownards Road, Belfast. Alleged criminal.

————————————————————–

05 September 1995
Tony Kane,  (29)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot, while sat in his stationary car, St. Agnes Drive, Andersonstown, Belfast

————————————————————–

Main source CAIN Web Service

See: 5th September

24th August – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

24th   August

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

 

Sunday 24 August 1975

Two Catholic civilians were abducted and shot dead by the Protestant Action Force (PAF), a covername used by the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF). The shootings happened near Newtownhamilton, County Armagh.

Sunday 24 August 1975

Two Catholic civilians were abducted and shot dead by the Protestant Action Force (PAF), a covername used by the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF). The shootings happened near Newtownhamilton, County Armagh.

Monday 24 August 1981

Bernard Fox, then an Irish Republican Army (IRA) prisoner, joined the hunger strike.

Friday 24 August 2001

A shot was fired at the front door of the home of a young couple and their 18-month old son in Ballymoney Road, Ballymena, County Antrim. No one was injured in the attack which happened shortly after 1.00am (0100BST).

The Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) found a quantity of ammunition during a planned search in the Ballysally estate, Coleraine, County Derry. One man was arrested in connection with the discovery.

A man (31) appeared at Belfast Magistrates Court to answer four charges related to threatening to kill, attempting to unlawfully imprison, kidnapping, and assault causing actual bodily harm. He was remanded in custody until 21 September 2001. The charges refer to an alleged attempted abduction on the Crumlin Road in the Ardoyne area of north Belfast on Wednesday 22 August 2001. The man was arrested on Thursday 23 August 2001.

Two men who were being treated in hospital for gunshot wounds were arrested by the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC). The men had been shot and injured in separate Republican paramilitary ‘punishment’ attacks on 23 August 2001. The men were believed to have been questioned by police about the killing of man in the Shankill area of Belfast on 16 August 2001.


Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the follow  people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To  the Paramilitaries  –

“There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth

killing for.

8 people lost their lives on the 24th  August between 1972 – 1991

————————————————————–

24 August 1972
Ian Caie,   (19) nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in land mine attack on British Army (BA) mobile patrol, Moybane, near Crossmaglen, County Armagh.

————————————————————–

24 August 1973


Patrick Duffy,   (37)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Found shot in abandoned car, Buncrana Road, Derry. Alleged informer.

————————————————————–

24 August 1975


Colm McCartney,  (22)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Protestant Action Force (PAF)
Shot while travelling in car, shortly after stopping at bogus vehicle checkpoint, Altnamackan, near Newtownhamilton, County Armagh.

————————————————————–

24 August 1975


Sean Farmer,  (30)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Protestant Action Force (PAF)
Shot while travelling in car, shortly after stopping at bogus vehicle checkpoint, Altnamackan, near Newtownhamilton, County Armagh.

————————————————————–

24 August 1980
Rodney McCormick,   (22)

Catholic
Status: Civilian Political Activist (CivPA),

Killed by: Ulster Defence Association (UDA)
Irish Republican Socialist Party member. Shot outside his home, Antiville, Larne, County Antrim

————————————————————–

24 August 1983
William Young,  (52)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot at his shop, Magazine Street, Derry. Altercation with Irish Republican Army (IRA) unit.

————————————————————–

24 August 1985
Kieran Murray,   (28)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while travelling in car along Slate Quarry Road, near Pomeroy, County Tyrone. His vehicle mistaken for Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) civilian-type car.

————————————————————–

24 August 1991


Martin Watters,  (27)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Found beaten to death, in River Lagan, by Queen’s Road, Lisburn, County Antrim.

————————————————————–