Tag Archives: Miriam Daly

Miriam Daly: Life & Death

Miriam Daly

Life & Death

Miriam Daly (1928 – 26 June 1980) was an Irish republican activist and university lecturer who was assassinated by the loyalist Ulster Defence Association (UDA).

Background and personal life

She was born in the Curragh Irish Army camp, County KildareIreland. She grew up in Hatch Street, Dublin, attending Loreto College on St Stephen’s Green and then University College, Dublin, graduating in history. The economic historian George O’Brien supervised her MPhil in economic history, on Irish emigration to England.

She went on to teach economic history in UCD for some years before moving to Southampton University with her husband, Joseph Lee. Two years after her first husband died, she remarried, to James Daly, returning to Ireland with him in 1968. They both were appointed lecturers in Queen’s University, Belfast.

 – Disclaimer –

The views and opinions expressed in these pages/documentaries are solely intended to educate and provide background information to those interested in the Troubles of Northern Ireland. They in no way reflect my own opinions and I take no responsibility for any inaccuracies or factual errors.

Civil Rights activist

History is written by the winner Mural

She soon became an activist in the civil rights movement, particularly following the introduction of internment without trial by the Stormont government. She was active in the Northern Ireland Civil Rights Association and the Northern Resistance Movement.

She was a militant member of the Prisoners’ Relatives Action Committee, and the national Hunger Strike Committee. In that campaign, she worked with Seamus Costello, and soon joined him in the Irish Republican Socialist Party and the Irish National Liberation Army.

IRSP logo 2018.png

After Costello was assassinated, she became chairperson, leading the party for two years. During this time she and her husband James were instrumental in opposing Sinn Féin‘s drift towards federalism.

Death

On 26 June 1980 Daly was shot dead at home, in the Andersonstown area of west Belfast. At the time of her assassination, she was in charge of the IRSP prisoners’ welfare.

According to reports in The Irish Times, members of the Ulster Defence Association (UDA) had gained entry to her home with the intention of killing her husband, who was also a republican activist.  Daly was captured and tied up whilst they waited for him to return home. However, he was in Dublin at the time and so did not arrive.

After a considerable time, the UDA men decided to kill Daly instead. Muffling the sound of the gun with a cushion, they shot her in the head and cut the phone lines before fleeing. Her body was discovered when her ten-year-old daughter arrived home from school.

Daly was buried in Swords, County Dublin. Mourners at her funeral, which featured the firing of a volley of shots over her coffin, included Seán Mac Stíofáin and Ruairí Ó Brádaigh. She is included as a volunteer on the INLA monument in Milltown Cemetery and is one of several commemorated by an IRSP mural on the Springfield Road, Belfast.

Commemoration Speech on Miriam Daly

See: 26th June – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

See: John “Big John” McMichael – 9th January 1948 – 22nd December 1987

See: Ronnie Bunting

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 51fEpe1j3AL._SX313_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg
This book goes into some detail about her life and death. Click to buy

My book is now avaiable to order, see below for more detauls

Ronnie Bunting: Life & Death

Ronnie Bunting (1947/1948 – 15 October 1980) was a Protestant Irish republican and socialist activist in Ireland. He became a member of the Official IRA in the early 1970s and was a founder-member of the Irish National Liberation Army (INLA) in 1974. He became leader of the INLA in 1978 and was assassinated in 1980 at age 32.

Background

Major Ronnie Bunting

Bunting came from an Ulster Protestant family in East Belfast. His father, Ronald Bunting, had been a major in the British Army and Ronnie grew up in various military barracks around the world. Ronnie’s father became a supporter and associate of Ian Paisley and ran for election under the Protestant Unionist Party banner.

Having completed his education and graduating from Queen’s University Belfast, Ronnie Bunting briefly became a history teacher in Belfast, but later become involved in the Northern Ireland Civil Rights Association and then with Irish republican organisations.

Unlike most Protestants in Northern Ireland, Bunting became a militant republican. His father, by contrast, was a committed Ulster loyalist, who organised armed stewards for counter-demonstrations (against civil rights marches) called by Ian Paisley, most infamously at the Burntollet Bridge incident, when his followers attacked a People’s Democracy civil rights march on 4 January 1969. Despite their political differences, Ronnie remained close with his father.

– Disclaimer –

The views and opinions expressed in these blog posts/documentaries are solely intended to educate and provide background information to those interested in the Troubles of Northern Ireland. They in no way reflect my own opinions and I take no responsibility for any inaccuracies or factual errors

Membership of the Official IRA

Bunting joined the Official Irish Republican Army (OIRA) around 1970 as he was attracted to their left-wing and secular interpretation of Irish republicanism and believed in the necessity of armed revolution. The other wing of the IRA—the Provisional Irish Republican Army—was seen to be more Catholic and nationalist in its outlook. At this time, the communal conflict known as the Troubles was beginning and the Official IRA were involved in shootings and bombings. Bunting was interned in November 1971 and held in Long Kesh until the following April (see also Operation Demetrius).

Membership of the INLA

In 1974, Bunting followed Seamus Costello and other militants who disagreed with the OIRA’s ceasefire of 1972, into a new grouping, the Irish National Liberation Army (INLA). Immediately, a violent feud broke out between the OIRA and the INLA.

In 1975, Bunting survived an assassination attempt when he was shot in a Belfast street. In 1977, Costello was killed by an OIRA gunman in Dublin. Bunting and his family hid in Wales until 1978, when he returned to Belfast. For the remaining two years of his life, Bunting was the military leader of the INLA. The grouping regularly attacked the British Army and Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) in Belfast.

Bunting called in claims of responsibility to the media by the code name “Captain Green”.

INLA Documentary

Assassination

Ronnie Bunting listed, as a civilian, on a roll of honour of republican dead, Springfield Road, Belfast

At about 4:30 a.m. on 15 October 1980, several gunmen wearing balaclavas stormed Bunting’s home in the Downfine Gardens area of Andersonstown. They shot Bunting, his wife Suzanne and another Protestant INLA man and ex-member of the Red Republican Party, Noel Lyttle, who had been staying there after his recent release from detention. According to The Guardian report by David Beresford,

The shots woke the Buntings’ children, age 7 and 3, who ran screaming into the street after discovering their parents lying together at the top of the stairs, covered in blood. Mr Lyttle was shot in bed, near a cot in which the Buntons’ baby son was sleeping.

Both Ronnie Bunting and Lyttle were killed. Suzanne Bunting, who was shot in the face,survived her serious injuries. The attack was claimed by the Ulster Defence Association (UDA), but the INLA claimed the Special Air Service were involved.

Upon his death, Bunting’s body was kept in a funeral parlour on the Newtownards Road opposite the headquarters of the UDA. On the day of the funeral, as the coffin was being removed, UDA members jeered from their building. The IRSP had wanted a republican paramilitary-style funeral for Bunting but his father refused and had Bunting buried in the family plot of a Church of Ireland cemetery near Donaghadee

See: Miriam Daly: Life & Death

See: John “Big John” McMichael – 9th January 1948 – 22nd December 1987

See: Soapboxie.com

See: UDA

See: 15th October – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

This book covers his life and death in some detail. Click to buy

Mian Source : Wikipedia Ronnie Bunting

My book is now available to order online, see below for more details

26th June – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

26th June

——————————-

Friday 26 June 1970

Five People Killed in Premature Explosion

Thomas McCool

Two young girls, aged 9 years and 4 years, died in a premature explosion at their home in the Creggan area of Derry.

Their father, a member of the Irish Republican Army (IRA), had been making an incendiary device, presumably for use against the British Army. The explosion killed two other members of the IRA.

The girls were the first females to die in ‘the Troubles’.

Bernadette Devlin, Member of Parliament (MP), was arrested and jailed for six months for riotous behaviour during the ‘Battle of the Bogside’.

battle05 of bogside

See Battle of Bogside

There was rioting between the British Army and local residents in Derry following the news of the arrest. The riots spread to Belfast.

Monday 26 June 1972

Start of ‘Truce’

The Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA) began a “bi-lateral truce” as at midnight.

[The move was made as a prelude to secret talks with the British Government. The ceasefire ended on 9 July 1972.]

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) killed two British Army soldiers in separate attacks during the day.

Tuesday 26 June 1973

senator paddy wilson

Paddy Wilson (39), then a Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) Stormont Senator, and Irene Andrews (29), then his secretary, were found stabbed to death in a quarry on the Hightown Road, Belfast.

They had been killed by members of the Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF) a covername for the Ulster Defence Association (UDA).

[John White was later convicted for his part in these killings. White was later to become a leading spokesman for the Ulster Democratic Party (UDP) and was involved in the negotiations that led to the ‘Good Friday’ Peace Agreement on 10 April 1998.]

See Paddy Wilson and Irene Andrews killings

A civilian employed by the British Army was shot dead by the IRA as he left an Army base in Derry. A Catholic civilian died four days after been shot by the British Army in Derry.

Thursday 26 June 1980

Miriam Daly, a prominent member of the National H-Block / Armagh Committee, was shot dead by Loyalist paramilitaries at her home in Andersontown, Belfast.

Thursday 26 June 1986

A constitution referendum on the issue of divorce was held in the Republic of Ireland.

[When the votes were counted the population had rejected the opportunity to introduce a restricted form of divorce by 63.5 per cent to 36.5 per cent. Many Unionists in Northern Ireland saw the result as confirming their view that the Republic was intolerant of Protestants.

Garret FitzGerald, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), said that the Republic had a long way to go to create “a society that would seem welcoming to, open to and attractive to people of the Northern Unionist tradtion.]

Wednesday 26 June 1991

Maguire Seven Freed The convictions of the group of people known as the ‘Maguire Seven’ were quashed by the Court of Appeal in London. The seven had been convicted of supplying the bombs that were used in Guildford and Woolwich.

[This was the latest in a series of high profile cases of miscarriage of justice involving Irish people living in England.]

Saturday 26 June 1993

John Major, then British Prime Minister, began a two-day visit to Northern Ireland. Major called for a resumption of political talks between the constitutional parties.

The Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) moved to prevent an Orange Order parade close to the peace line in the Springfield area of Belfast. The action led to rioting.

Brian McCallum (26), a member of the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF), was mortally wounded when a grenade he was handling exploded prematurely. Eighteen other people were injured.

[McCallum died on 29 June 1993.]

Monday 26 June 1995

The High Court in Belfast awarded compensation to the mother of Karen Reilly (16) who was shot dead by a British soldier on 30 September 1990.

lee glegg

[The amount of the compensation was not disclosed. Reilly had been shot dead by Lee Clegg, a paratrooper with the British Army, during a ‘joyriding’ incident. Clegg was released from prison on 3 July 1995.]

See Lee Clegg

Wednesday 26 June 1996

David Trimble, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), admitted bringing pressure to bear on the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) and the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) over the events on the Garvaghy Road in 1995.

Trimble had pressed for prosecutions against the leaders of the Garvaghy Road residents who had opposed the 1995 Drumcree Orange march. Prosecutions were dismissed. Veronica Guerin, an investigative journalist in Dublin, was shot dead near to Dublin.

Thursday 26 June 1997

The Fianna Fáil (FF) party appointed Ray Burke as Irish Minister for Foreign Affairs. It was also announced that David Andrews (FF) would be Minister for Defence and Liz O’Donnell (Progressive Democrats) would be Junior Minister for Foreign Affairs, and that both these ministers would assist Burke at Stormont.

[These appointments were part of the cabinet announced by Bertie Ahern, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), following the general election in the Republic of Ireland on 6 June 1997.]

Friday 26 June 1998

As counting got under way in the Northern Ireland Assembly election the relatively poor early showing of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) resulted in the bitter divisions within the party becoming public.

Jeffrey Donaldson, then UUP Member of Parliament (MP), who opposed the Good Friday Agreement accused his party colleague, Ken Maginnis, in a televised debate of:

“presiding over an electoral disaster”.

Maginnis replied by accusing Donaldson of “gloating over the difficulties that he and others like him” had created for the party.

Both nationalist parties, the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) and Sinn Féin (SF), were pleased with a strong first preference showing

Monday 26 June 2000

IRA Arms Inspected

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) issued a statement to say that it had opened some of its arms dumps to be viewed by the independent weapons inspectors. Cyril Ramaphosa and Martti Ahtisaari, then independent weapons inspectors, held a meeting with Tony Blair, then British Prime Minister, in Downing Street and confirmed that the inspection had taken place.

 

——————————————

Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

18 People lost their lives on the 26th   June between 1970 – 1993

——————————————

26 June 1970


Thomas McCool  (40)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died in premature explosion of incendiary device at his home, Dunree Gardens, Creggan, Derry.

——————————————

26 June 1970
 Bernadette McCool   (9)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died in premature explosion of incendiary device at her home, Dunree Gardens, Creggan, Derry.

——————————————

26 June 1970
Carol Ann McCool  (4)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died in premature explosion of incendiary device at her home, Dunree Gardens, Creggan, Derry.

——————————————

26 June 1970


Joseph Coyle   (40)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died in premature explosion of incendiary device at the McCool household, Dunree Gardens, Creggan, Derry

——————————————

26 June 1970


Thomas Carlin  (55)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Injured in premature explosion of incendiary device at the McCool household, Dunree Gardens, Creggan, Derry. He died 8 July 1970.

——————————————

26 June 1972


David Houston   (22)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot attempting to stop bomb attack on The Stables Bar, Water Street, Newry, County Down.

——————————————

26 June 1972
James Meredith   (20)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot while on British Army (BA) foot patrol, Abercorn Road, Derry.

——————————————

26 June 1972


Malcolm Banks   (30)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while on British Army (BA) mobile patrol, junction of Seaforde Street and Comber Street, Short Strand, Belfast.

——————————————

26 June 1972
 John Black  (32)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Association (UDA),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Died five weeks after being shot at barricade during street disturbances, Douglas Street, off Beersbridge Road, Belfast.

——————————————

26 June 1973


Paddy Wilson  (39)

Catholic
Status: Civilian Political Activist (CivPA),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) Stormont Senator and Councillor. Together with his secretary, found stabbed to death in quarry, Hightown Road, near Belfast, County Antrim.

See Paddy Wilson and Irene Andrews killings

——————————————

26 June 1973


Irene Andrews  (29)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Together with Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) Stormont Senator and Councillor, Paddy Wilson, found stabbed to death in quarry, Hightown Road, near Belfast, County Antrim.

See Paddy Wilson and Irene Andrews killings

——————————————

26 June 1973
Noorbaz Khan  (45)

nfNI
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Civilian employed by British Army (BA). Shot shortly after driving out of Bligh’s Lane British Army (BA) base, Creggan, Derry.

——————————————

26 June 1973


Robert McGuinness  (22)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Died four days after being shot while walking along Brandywell Avenue, Derry

——————————————

26 June 1976
Daniel Mackin  (20)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Found stabbed to death, Brookvale Street, off Cliftonville Road, Belfast.

——————————————

26 June 1980


Miriam Daly  (45)

Catholic
Status: Civilian Political Activist (CivPA),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Irish Republican Socialist Party (IRSP) member. Found shot at her home, Andersonstown Road, Andersonstown, Belfast.

——————————————

26 June 1981
Vincent Robinson   (29)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Found shot, Divis Flats, Belfast. Alleged informer.

——————————————

26 June 1987


John Tracey  (46)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Shot while renovating house, Surrey Street, off Lisburn Road, Belfast.

——————————————

26 June 1993
John Randall  (19)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper, while on British Army (BA) foot patrol, crossing field, near Newtownhamilton, County Armagh.

——————————————