Tag Archives: Joseph Cunningham

25th June – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

25th June

Monday 25 June 1973

Three members of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) were killed when a bomb they were transporting exploded prematurely on the Gortin Road, near Omagh, County Tyrone.

A Protestant civilian was shot dead by Loyalists in Belfast.

Friday 25 June 1976

Three Protestant civilians were shot dead during a gun attack on The Store Bar, Lyle Hill Road, Templepatrick, County Antrim.

The attack was carried out by a group called the Republican Action Force (RAF), believed to be a covername for some members of the Irish Republican Army (IRA).

Wednesday 25 June 1980

The Democratic Party in the United States of America (USA) adopted as policy a proposal put forward by Edward Kennedy, then a Senator. The new policy called for an end to the divisions of the Irish people and a solution based on the consent of all of the parties.

Tuesday 25 June 1985

The United States of America (USA) and the United Kingdom (UK) sign a bilateral treaty that would prevent people facing extradition from claiming that their crimes had a political motive.

Thursday 25 June 1992

James Molyneaux, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), together with Ian Paisley, then leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), put a motion before the House of Commons which called for the setting up of a Northern Ireland Select Committee.

The motion was supported by the Liberal Democrats, and the Welsh and Scottish Nationalist parties. However the government opposed the motion which failed to gain sufficient suppport.

Wednesday 25 June 1997

The Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) carried out a search of a house in Dunmurray, Belfast, and found a number of AK47 rifles.

The police had earlier gone to the wrong address.

Colin Duffy was charged with the murder of two RUC officers in Lurgan on 16 June 1997. Duffy’s solicitor alleged that the RUC had mistreated Duffy while in custody.

The British and Irish governments announced that they were giving the Irish Republican Army (IRA) a period of five weeks during which to call an unequivocal ceasefire.

Following any ceasefire a further period of six weeks would then elapse before Sinn Féin (SF) could enter the talks at Stormont when they resumed on 15 September 1997. The talks were scheduled to conclude in May 1998.

[SF later called for “clarification” of the statement but were told that they would not be given any.]

Friday 25 June 1999

Marjorie (Mo) Mowlam, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, rejected demands for an Inquiry into the killing of Billy Wright inside the Maze Prison on 27 December 1997.

billy writgt

See Billy Wright

Tony Blair, the British Prime Minster, and Bertie Ahern, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), travelled to Belfast for a series of meetings at Stormont with the political parties.

[These meetings were held prior to a week of intensive negotiations, beginning on Monday 28 June. The deadline for overcoming the political impasse had been set for 30 June.]

  

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

11 People lost their lives on the 25th  June between 1972 – 1987

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25 June 1972
James Bonner  (19)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot while travelling in stolen car, Whiterock Road, Ballymurphy, Belfast.

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25 June 1973


Joseph Cunningham   (36)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot at his home, Nore Street, Lower Oldpark, Belfast. Alleged informer.

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25 June 1973
Sean Loughran   (37)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died in premature bomb explosion while travelling in car, Gortin Road, near Omagh, County Tyrone.

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25 June 1973
Patrick Carty  (26)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died in premature bomb explosion while travelling in car, Gortin Road, near Omagh, County Tyrone.

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25 June 1973
Dermot Crowley   (18)

nfNI
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA), Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
From County Cork. Died in premature bomb explosion while travelling in car, Gortin Road, near Omagh, County Tyrone.

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25 June 1976
Ruby Kidd  (28)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Republican Action Force (RepAF)
Shot during gun attack on Walker’s Bar, Lyle Hill Road, Templepatrick, County Antrim.

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25 June 1976
Francis Walker   (17)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Republican Action Force (RepAF)
Shot during gun attack on Walker’s Bar, Lyle Hill Road, Templepatrick, County Antrim

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25 June 1976
Joseph McBride   (56)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Republican Action Force (RepAF)
Shot during gun attack on Walker’s Bar, Lyle Hill Road, Templepatrick, County Antrim

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25 June 1978
Patrick McEntee   (54)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Found shot, Ballsmill, near Forkhill, County Armagh. Alleged informer.

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25 June 1978
Alan Ferguson   (23)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot during sniper and landmine attack on British Army (BA) Armoured Personnel Carrier, Belcoo, County Fermanagh

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25 June 1987


Dominic O’Connor   (30)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot outside his home, Springfield Road, Belfast.

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10th February – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

10th February

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Thursday 10 February 1972

  

Two British soldiers were killed in a land mine attack near Cullyhanna, County Armagh.. An IRA member was shot dead during an exchange of gunfire with RUC officers.

Saturday 10 February 1973

Two members of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) were killed in a premature explosion near Strangford, County Down.

Monday 10 February 1975

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) Truce

Two Catholic civilians were shot dead by Loyalist paramilitaries in a gun attack on Hayden’s Bar, near Pomeroy, County Tyrone. A Catholic civilian was shot dead by Loyalists in Belfast. The renewed Irish Republican Army (IRA) ceasefire began.

[The ceasefire was to last officially until 23 January  however there were a number of incidents during 1975 involving members of the IRA. During the period of the ceasefire the British government and the Northern Ireland Office (NIO) denied that a deal had been made with the IRA. Sinn Féin (SF) and the IRA said a 12 point plan had been agreed with the British. Some of the elements of this alleged deal were to become apparent such as the setting up of ‘incident centres’ and a reduction in security force activity in Nationalist areas.]

Thursday 10 February 1977

Those members of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) who were arrested at the end of the Balcombe Street siege in London were convicted of six murders.

Crime - Balcombe Street Seige...Metropolitan Police Commissioner Sir Robert Mark (second r) talks to policemen on the corner of Balcombe Street, Marylebone, near the flat where a group of gunmen are holding a middle-aged couple hostage ... Crime - Balcombe Street Seige ... 08-12-1975 ... London ... Great Britain ... Photo credit should read: PA Photos/PA Archive. Unique Reference No. 4268185 ...

[The Balcombe Street siege had begun on 6 December 1975.]

See Balcombe Street siege

Sunday 10 February 1980

Betty Williams, one of the founding members of the Peace People, resigned from the organisation for family reasons.

[There was speculation that there had been serious disagreements among the main members of the organisation. On 5 March 1980 another member of the Peace People, Peter McLachlan, also resigned.]

Tuesday 10 February 1987

An opinion poll published in the Daily Express (a British newspaper) found that 61 per cent of the British public were in favour of British withdrawal from Northern Ireland.

Saturday 10 February 1990

A Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) patrol came under gunfire on the Shankill Road, Belfast. The shooting incident was attributed to the Ulster Defence Association (UDA) which, it was claimed, was resentful of the work of the Stevens Inquiry.

Hugh Annesley, then Chief Constable of the RUC, issued a strategy document for the future of the RUC.

Monday 10 February 1992

The British government sent an extra battalion of British Army troops to Northern Ireland.

Wednesday 10 February 1993

Albert Reynolds, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), nominated Gordon Wilson to become a member of the Irish Senate (the upper house of the Irish Parliament).

[Gordon Wilson had been injured, and his daughter killed, in the Enniskillen bomb on 8 November 1987.]

Thursday 10 February 1994

McGlinchey Killed

Dominic McGlinchey, former leader of the Irish National Liberation Army (INLA), was shot dead by three gunmen in Drogheda, Republic of Ireland.

 It is not clear which organisation was responsible for the killing

Saturday 10 February 1996

John Bruton, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), announced that the Irish Government was breaking off ministerial contact with Sinn Féin (SF) in the light of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) bombing in London on 9 February 1996.

Monday 10 February 1997

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) left a large bomb on the outskirts of Strabane, County Tyrone. The bomb was defused by the British Army.

Ed Turner, then Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) mayor of Strabane, said that in light of the attempted bombing he would not be recommending anyone to invest in the town. His statement drew criticism from Nationalists. Gerry Adams, then President of Sinn Féin (SF), sent a fax to John Major, then British Prime Minister, requesting talks between SF and the British government.

Tuesday 10 February 1998

Robert Dougan (38), a leading Loyalist, was shot dead in Dunmurry near Belfast.

[It was believed that Dougan was a leading member of the Ulster Defence Association (UDA). While no group claimed responsibility for the killing Republican paramilitaries were involved and the Irish Republican Army (IRA) were later blamed by the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) for the death. The killing of Dougan (and Brendan Campbell on 9 February 1998) led to the expulsion of Sinn Féin (SF) from the multi-party talks on 20 February 1998.]

Mark Fulton, considered to be a leading Loyalist figure, was attacked by a gunman who fired two shots at him in the Redmondville estate, Portadown, County Armagh. Fulton escaped injury but blamed the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) for the attack. This claim was denied by David Ervine, then leader of the Progressive Unionist Party (PUP).

Wednesday 10 February 1999

The Belfast Telegraph (a Belfast based newspaper) published the results of an opinion poll. The poll showed that, of Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) supporters questioned, 63 per cent approved of David Trimble, then leader of the UUP.

Saturday 10 February 2001

There was a pipe-bomb attack on a Catholic home in Derry. A couple and their two nieces, aged five and three, escaped injury when the device was thrown through the kitchen window of their home in the Waterside area. It exploded, causing minor damage to the house. The attack was carried out by Loyalist paramilitaries.

Sunday 10 February 2002

There was stone throwing in the Arthur Bridge area of the Whitewell Road, north Belfast. The disturbances happened during the evening and followed on from rioting on Saturday (9 February 2002).

Pupils from the Holy Cross Girls’ Primary School in Ardoyne, north Belfast, travelled to County Galway to begin a holiday as guests of Peacock’s Hotel. The management of the hotel had made the offer of the holiday following incidents during 2001 when the school was blockaded by Loyalist protesters.

 

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following  people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live  forever

– To  the Paramilitaries  –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

12  People   lost their lives on the 10th February  between  1972 – 1998

  —————————————————————————

10 February 1972


Joseph Cunningham,   (26)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC)
Shot during gun battle, O’Neill’s Road, Newtownabbey, County Antrim.

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10 February 1972


Ian Harris,  (26)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in land mine attack on British Army (BA) mobile patrol, Cullyhanna, County Armagh.

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10 February 1972


David Champ,  (23)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in land mine attack on British Army (BA) mobile patrol, Cullyhanna, County Armagh

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10 February 1973
Leonard O’Hanlon,  (23)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died in premature bomb explosion in the grounds of Castleward National Trust Estate, near Strangford, County Down.

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10 February 1973
Vivienne Fitzsimmons,   (17)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died in premature bomb explosion in the grounds of Castleward National Trust Estate, near Strangford, County Down.

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10 February 1975


Joseph Fitzpatrick,   (19)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Road sweeper. Shot while sweeping street, Cooke Place, off Ormeau Road, Belfast

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0 February 1975


Arthur Mulholland,  (65)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot during gun attack on Hayden’s Bar, The Rock, near Pomeroy, County Tyrone

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10 February 1975


Eugene Doyle,   (18)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot during gun attack on Hayden’s Bar, The Rock, near Pomeroy, County Tyrone

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10 February 1980


Hugh Maguire, (9)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: not known (nk)
Killed during street disturbances, Springfield Road, Ballymurphy, Belfast. Confrontation between local people and British Army (BA) patrol.

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10 February 1981
David Montgomery,  (27)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Shot at his workplace, a timber yard, Strand Road, Derry.

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10 February 1994


 Dominic McGlinchey,  (42)

Catholic
Status: ex-Irish National Liberation Army (xINLA),

Killed by: not known (nk)
Former leader of Irish National Liberation Army (INLA). Shot while at public telephone kiosk, Hardmans Gardens, Drogheda, County Louth.

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10 February 1998


Robert Dougan,  (38)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Association (UDA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot, while sitting in his stationary car, outside Balmoral Textiles Ltd, Station View, off Upper Dunmurry Lane, Dunmurry, near Belfast, County Antrim.

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