Tag Archives: John Martin

5th June – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

5th June

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Tuesday 5 June 1973

At the Northern Ireland Office (NIO) Lord Windlesham was replaced by Lord Belstead as the government spokesman on Northern Ireland.

David Howell became Minister of State at Stormont.

Thursday 5 June 1975

Brendan McNamee (22), then a member of the Irish National Liberation Army (INLA), was shot dead by members of the Official Irish Republican Army (OIRA) in the continuing feud between the OIRA and the INLA.

Saturday 5 June 1976

The Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) carried out a gun attack on the Chlorane Bar, Gresham Street, Belfast, and killed three Protestant civilians and two Catholic civilians.

In a separate bomb attack on the International Bar, Portaferry, County Down, the UVF killed a Catholic civilian.

Republican paramilitaries carried out a bomb attack on the Times Bar, York Road, Belfast, killing two Protestant civilians.

Colm Mulgrew

A member of Sinn Féin (SF) was shot dead by the Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF), a covername for the Ulster Defence Association (UDA), at Camberwell Terrace, Belfast.

Monday 5 June 1978

Roy Mason, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, asked Amnesty International to delay publication of a report it had written into alleged ill-treatment of detainees at Castlereagh detention centre.

[The report was published on 13 June 1978.]

Tuesday 5 June 1984 

George Seawright, Independent Unionist candidate, June 1987, UK General Election, 19870603GS1

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George Seawright, then a Belfast councillor and Loyalist, told a meeting of the Belfast Education and Library Board that Catholics and their priests should be incinerated.

[The Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) later withdrew the ‘Whip’ from Seawright because of the comments.]

See George Seawright

Tuesday 5 June 1984

Three Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) officers were acquitted of the murder of Eugene Toman (21) in 1982. Toman was a member of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) at the time but was unarmed when shot at an RUC vehicle check point.

Two other IRA members were shot dead in the same incident.

The judge, Lord Justice Gibson, said that the RUC officers should be commended “for their courage and determination in bringing the three deceased men to justice, in this case to the final court of justice.” [Many Nationalists found the judge’s remarks offensive.]

Thursday 5 June 1986

Stalker Removed From Inquiry

John Stalker, then Deputy Chief Constable of the Greater Manchester Police, was removed from the investigation into the alleged ‘shoot-to-kill’ policy of the security forces in Northern Ireland.

Colin Sampson, then Chief Constable of West Yorkshire, took over the investigation.

[Stalker was suspended from duty on 30 June 1986. Allegations were made about Stalker’s association with ‘known criminals’ but he was cleared of these allegations and reinstated on 22 August 1986.]

Tuesday 5 July 1988

Patrick Ryan, a Catholic priest from the Republic of Ireland, was arrested in Brussels. He was accused of providing support for the Irish Republican Army (IRA) .

Wednesday 5 June 1991

The main political parties in Northern Ireland agreed to the start of the main political talks (later known as the Brooke / Mayhew talks) on 17 June 1991.

Wednesday 5 June 1996

Following three days of talks the British and Irish Governments agreed ground rules for all-party talks.

The three members of the International Body on Arms Decommissioning, George Mitchell, John de Chastelain, and Harri Holkeri, were to chair various strands of the proposed talks. The Irish Republican Army (IRA) issued a statement that a new ceasefire was “remote in the extreme”.

Friday 5 June 1998

The British government published the Northern Ireland (Sentences) Bill.

Saturday 5 June 1999

Woman Killed by Loyalist Paramilitaries

Elizabeth O’Neill (59) was killed when Loyalist paramilitaries carried out a pipe-bomb attack on her home in the Corcrain estate in Portadown, County Armagh.

Mrs O’Neill was a Protestant who was married to a Catholic. The bomb was thrown through the window of the O’Neill home and it is believed that Mrs O’Neill was killed as she tried to carry it out of the house.

David Trimble, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), cancelled a planned trip to Israel because of the killing and described it as an attempt to derail efforts to resolve the Drumcree parade crisis.

[‘Mixed-marriage’ (or ‘cross-community’ / ‘mixed religion’) couples had been targeted by paramilitaries since the beginning of the conflict. On 8 June 1999 the Loyalist Volunteer Force (LVF) denied responsibility for the pipe-bomb attack.]

A blast bomb exploded in another Catholic home in Westland Road, Portadown. A woman was inside with her 10-month-old baby and sister, aged 17. No one is injured.

A pipe-bomb was made safe after it was discovered at a house in the Catholic Short Strand area of east Belfast. Several families were evacuated from their homes in Twinbrook, west Belfast while the Army dealt with two pipe-bombs.

According to residents in the Acacia Avenue flats the devices had been lying for several hours in an area where children play before being discovered just before lunchtime.

Pipe-bombs were thrown at Catholic homes in Castlewellan, County Down and in East Belfast.

All the attacks were carried out by Loyalist paramilitaries.

Proximity talks between the Orange Order and representatives of the Garvaghy Road Residents’ Coalition (GRRC) stalled as the Orange Order representatives accused Frank Blair, then of the Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service (ACAS), of “complete bias”.

Monday 5 June 2000

The Northern Ireland Assembly met for the first time since it was suspended on 12 February 2000.

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

15 People lost their lives on the 5th   June  between 1973 – 1999

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05 June 1973


David Purvis   (22)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot from passing car while on Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) foot patrol, Belmore Street, Enniskillen, County Fermanagh.

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05 June 1973
Terence Herdman   (17)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Found shot by the side of Old Monaghan Road, near Clogher, County Tyrone. Alleged informer.

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05 June 1974
Frederick Dicks   (21)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while on British Army (BA) foot patrol, Irish Street, Dungannon, County Tyrone.

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05 June 1975


Brendan McNamee  (22)

Catholic
Status: Irish National Liberation Army (INLA),

Killed by: Official Irish Republican Army (OIRA)
Shot outside mobile chip van, Stewartstown Road, Suffolk, Belfast. Official Irish Republican Army (OIRA) / Irish National Liberation Army (INLA) feud.

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05 June 1976


 Colm Mulgrew   (26)

Catholic
Status: Civilian Political Activist (CivPA),

Killed by: Ulster Defence Association (UDA)
Sinn Fein (SF) member. Shot at his home, Camberwell Terrace, off Antrim Road, Belfast.

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05 June 1976
Edward McMurray  (41)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Republican group (REP)
Killed in bomb attack on Times Bar, York Road, Belfast.

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05 June 1976
Robert Groves  (45)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Republican group (REP)
Killed in bomb attack on Times Bar, York Road, Belfast.

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05 June 1976


James Coyle   (50)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot during gun attack on Chlorane Bar, Gresham Street, Belfast.

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05 June 1976


Edward Farrell  (45)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot during gun attack on Chlorane Bar, Gresham Street, Belfast.

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05 June 1976
Daniel McNeill   (47)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot during gun attack on Chlorane Bar, Gresham Street, Belfast.

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05 June 1976
Samuel Corr   (53)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot during gun attack on Chlorane Bar, Gresham Street, Belfast.

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05 June 1976
John Martin  (59)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot during gun attack on Chlorane Bar, Gresham Street, Belfast. He died 23 June 1976

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05 June 1976
Christopher Byers   (24)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Killed in bomb attack on International Bar, Portaferry, County Down.

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05 June 1981


Ronald Graham  (39)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Shot while delivering coal, Lisnaskea, County Fermanagh.

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05 June 1999


Elizabeth O’Neill  (59)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Loyalist Volunteer Force (LVF)
Killed during bomb attack on her home, Corcrain Drive, Portadown, County Armagh. Married to a Catholic

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27th November – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

27th November

Thursday 27 November 1969

A Commissioner for Complaints, John Benn, was appointed to deal with matters related to local government and public bodies.

Saturday 27 November 1971

Two Customs officials, Ian Hankin (27) a Protestant and James O’Neill (39) a Catholic, were shot by an Irish Republican Army (IRA) sniper who fired upon a British Army (BA) patrol investigating a bomb attack on a Customs Post near Newry, County Armagh. A British soldier was shot dead in Belfast.

Wednesday 27 November 1974

Roy Jenkins

 

 

Roy Jenkins, then British Home Secretary, introduced the Prevention of Terrorism (Temporary Provisions) Bill into the House of Commons, Westminster. One of the provisions of the Bill provided the police with powers to arrest and detain suspected terroristts for up to 48 hours in the first instance, and for up to seven days if the police applied to the Home Secretary for additional time.

The provision also allowed for exclusion orders to be made against people suspected of involvement in terrorism. Jenkins described the provisions in the Bill as “draconian measures unprecedented in peacetime”.

[The Bill became law on 29 November 1974.]

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) carried out two bomb attacks near an Army museum in Tite Street, Chelsea, London. Initially a small bomb exploded in a post office pillar-box at 8.30pm. Approximately 20 minutes later a second, larger bomb, exploded behind a hedge just a short distance away from the first explosion. Twenty people were injured in the second explosion including an explosives officer, six policmen and two ambulance men.

[The tactic of the ‘come-on’ bomb was one which the IRA used on many occasions in Northern Ireland.]

Thursday 27 November 1975

Ross McWhirter (50), who had publicly criticised Irish Republican Army (IRA) violence, was shot dead by the IRA at his home in Village Road, Enfield, London. McWhirter was a founder of the Guinness Book of World Records and had offered a £50,000 reward for the capture of the IRA members responsible for the bombings in London.

Saturday 27 November 1976

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) killed two Catholic civilians in separate booby-trap bomb attacks in Lurgan, County Armagh and Bogside, Derry. The bombs had been intended for the security forces.

The Peace People held a rally in London which was attended by approximately 30,000 people. Republican sympathisers held a small counter demonstration and chanted ‘troops out’.

Thursday 27 November 1980

Humphrey Atkins, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, told the House of Commons that there was still no consensus amongst the parties in Northern Ireland and little prospect for a devolved government in the region.

Sunday 27 November 1983

Dominic McGlinchey, believed to be chief of staff of the Irish National Liberation Army (INLA), admitted that his organisation had been involved in the Darkley killings on 20 November 1983

 

Wednesday 27 November 1985

The House of Commons approved the Anglo-Irish Agreement (AIA) in a vote of 473 votes to 47. During her speech Margaret Thatcher, then British Prime Minister, said that the government would not give way to threats or violence.

Tuesday 27 November 1990

During the Conservative Party leadership contest Margaret Thatcher failed to win outright victory and withdrew from the race. John Major was elected as the new leader of the Conservative Party and the new British Prime Minister.

Wednesday 27 November 1991

Four members of the Irish National Liberation Army (INLA) were arrested outside the home of Laurence Kennedy, then leader of the Northern Ireland Conservative Party.

Saturday 27 November 1993

The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) held its annual conference in Cookstown, County Tyrone. In his address John Hume, then leader of the SDLP, stated that John Major, then British Prime Minister, held

“the key to peace”.

The Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) held its annual conference at Castlereagh in Belfast. Ian Paisley, then leader of the DUP, told delegates that Northern Ireland faced “the greatest threat to the Union since the Home Rule Crisis”.

Monday 27 November 1995

Catholic Killed in Sectarian Attack Norman Harley (46), a Catholic civilian, was found beaten to death at the Waterworks, off Cavehill Road, Belfast.

[Harley was going through the park to visit his mother when two Protestant men beat him to death with an iron bar before going to a public house. This sectarian killing appears not to have been carried out by Loyalist paramilitaries (McKitterick, 1999; p1383).]

Thursday 27 November 1997

Jack Mahood was shot and injured in his taxi depot in north Belfast.

[The attack was blamed on the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF). Mahood had been a member of the Progressive Unionist Party (PUP) negotiation team who resigned over differences on matters of policy.]

Friday 27 November 1997

The Northern Ireland Office (NIO) published a list of the main initiatives introduced since the IRA ceasefire of 20 July 1997 to reduce the impact of security measures.

 

Friday 27 November 1998

British soldiers who were serving in Derry on 30 January 1972 were offered immunity from prosecution when they provide evidence to the Saville inquiry into the events of ‘Bloody Sunday’.

Saturday 27 November 1999

The Ulster Unionist Council (UUC), the policy-making body of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), held a meeting in the Waterfront Hall, Belfast, to discuss the Mitchell Review. The Council decided by 480 votes to 349 to back the deal. The decision opened the way for the UUP to enter the power-sharing Executive with Sinn Féin (SF).

The UUC also attached a condition that the Council should meet again in February 2000 “to take a final decision” on the matter. At a press conference after the vote David Trimble, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), said:

“We’ve done our bit. Mr Adams its over to you. We’ve jumped, you follow”.

[It was later revealed that Trimble had lodged a post dated resignation letter with a party official which would come into effect if Irish Republican Army (IRA) decommissioning did not occur.]

The Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) held its annual conference at the La Mon House Hotel near Belfast. During his speech Ian Paisley, then leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), said that Northern Ireland was facing its gravest crisis and that no unionist should be holding negotiations with the Irish government, the SDLP, or Sinn Féin. He accused the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) of betrayal and said Trimble was as “much of an enemy of Ulster as the IRA”.

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following  people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live  forever

– To  the Paramilitaries  –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

11 People lost their lives on the 27th November between 1971 – 1995

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27 November 1971
Ian Hankin,  (27)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Customs official. Shot by snipers firing at British Army (BA) patrol which had just arrived after bomb attack on Killeen Customs Post, near Newry, County Armagh.

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27 November 1971
James O’Neill,  (39) Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ), Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Customs official. Shot by snipers firing at British Army (BA) patrol which had just arrived after bomb attack on Killeen Customs Post, near Newry, County Armagh.

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27 November 1971
Paul Nicholls, (18)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while on British Army (BA) foot patrol, St James Crescent, Falls, Belfast.

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27 November 1972
Rory Gormley, (14)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot while travelling in car, junction of Downing Street and Ariel Street, Shankill, Belfast

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27 November 1973
Desmond Morgan  (18)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot during attempted hijacking of vehicle, Coalisland, County Tyrone.

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27 November 1975
Ross McWhirter,  (50)

nfNIB
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot at his home, Village Road, Enfield, London.

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27 November 1976
Philomena Green ,  (16)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by booby trap bomb in derelict house, Mary Street, Lurgan, County Armagh. House had been used as British Army (BA) observation post.

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27 November 1976
Frank McConnellogue,   (46)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by booby trap bomb in entry, off Lecky Road, Bogside, Derry.

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27 November 1978
Robert Bachelor,  (36)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Shot just after leaving his workplace, Institution Place, off Durham Street, Belfast.

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27 November 1982
John Martin,   (34)

Protestant
Status: ex-Royal Ulster Constabulary (xRUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot at his garage, The Mall East, Armagh.

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27 November 1995
Norman Harley,   (46)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Found beaten to death, Waterworks, off Cavehill Road, Belfast.

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4th November – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

4th November

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Monday 4 November 1968

Terence O’Neill, then Northern Ireland Prime Minister, together with William Craig, then Home Affairs Minister, and Brian Faulkner, then Minister of Commerce, met in Downing Street, London, with Harold Wilson, then British Prime Minister, and James Callaghan, then British Home Secretary, for talks about the situation in Northern Ireland.

The British Prime Minister stated that there would be no change in the constitutional position of Northern Ireland without the consent of the Northern Ireland population.

[Wilson is believed to have pressed O’Neill to introduce urgent reforms. A reforms package was announced on 22 November 1968.]

Thursday 4 November 1971

British soldiers shot dead a man in Belfast. A British soldier died seven weeks after being mortally wounded in Belfast.

Brian Faulkner,

Brian Faulkner, then Northern Ireland Prime Minister, went to London for a meeting with Harold Wilson, then leader of the Labour Party, and James Callaghan, then shadow British Home Secretary.

Tuesday 4 November 1975

Merlyn Rees

Merlyn Rees, then Secretary of Sate for Northern Ireland, announced that anyone convicted of terrorist crimes committed after 1 March 1976 would not be accorded special category status.

Saturday 4 November 1978

The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) annual conference voted that British withdrawal was ‘desirable and inevitable’. The party also called for fresh talks between the British and Irish governments and representatives of the two communities in Northern Ireland.

Thursday 4 November 1982

The Irish coalition government was defeated in a vote of confidence in the Dáil.

Friday 4 November 1983

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) planted a bomb in a lecture room of the (then) Ulster Polytechnic at Jordanstown, County Antrim. The bomb was targeted at a lecture to members of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) and killed two officers and injured a further 33. [Another officer died from his injuries on 13 August 1984.]

Sunday 4 November 1984

In an article in the Sunday Press it was claimed that Margaret Thatcher, then British Prime Minister, had twice asked her advisors to produce assessments on the possibility of repartition, redrawing the border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.

Tuesday 4 November 1986

It was revealed that Margaret Thatcher, then British Prime Minister, had written to Garret FitzGerald, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), and rejected suggestions by the Irish government that Diplock courts in Northern Ireland should be heard by three judges instead of one.

Saturday 4 November 1989

The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) held its annual conference in Newcastle, County Down.

Wednesday 4 November 1992

The Northern Ireland Office (NIO) offered to extend 100 per cent capital funding to Catholic (maintained) schools

Thursday 4 November 1993

John Hume

John Hume, then leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), had a meeting with John Major, then British Prime Minister, in London. Hume later stated that there could be peace within a week if his proposals were adopted. Gordon Wilson revealed that he, along with two other people, had held a meeting with three leaders of Loyalist paramilitaries. The meeting took place earlier in the week.

Friday 4 November 1994

Seamus Mallon, then deputy leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), called for the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) to be split into four local police forces.

[The idea was dismissed by Sir Hugh Annesley, then Chief Constable of the RUC, on 10 November 1994.]

Wednesday 4 November 1998

The Northern Ireland Office (NIO) revealed that there had been an estimated 1,000 punishment attacks since September 1994. A British Army Review Board decide that the two Scots Guards, who had been convicted of the murder of Peter McBride (18), a Catholic civilian, in Belfast on 4 September 1992, could rejoin their regiment.

Thursday 4 November 1999

David Trimble

David Trimble, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), flew to Washington to brief officials at the White House on the Mitchell Review of the Agreement. Tommy English, a former Ulster Democratic Party (UDP) delegate, was charged along with two other men with aggravated burglary. The charge related to accusations that the three men had caused damage with baseball bats to the Crow’s Nest pub in Belfast.

The Irish Times (a Dublin based newspaper) published the results of an opinion poll which indicated that the Irish Government’s satisfaction rating was at its lowest since the Coalition was formed in 1997. The survey was conducted by MRBI on behalf of the Irish Times.

Sunday 4 November 2001

New Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) The Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) came into being with a change to the name of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC). The powers of the new Northern Ireland Policing Board took effect. The first batch of the 308 recruits to the PSNI, recruited on the basis of 50 per cent Catholic and 50 per cent Protestant, began their training. [The Patten report containing recommendations for the police service in Northern Ireland was published in September 1999 and an ‘Updated Implementation Plan 2001’ was published on 17 August 2001. The report called for sweeping changes to the RUC’s name, badge, structure, ethos, and recruitment procedures.]

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following  people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live  forever

– To  the Paramilitaries  –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

 9  People lost their lives on the 4th November between 1971 – 1992

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04 November 1971


Stephen McGuire,   (20)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died seven weeks after being shot by sniper at Henry Taggart British Army (BA) base, Ballymurphy, Belfast.

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04 November 1971


Christopher Quinn,   (39)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot while walking along entry by Unity Flats, off Upper Library Street, Belfast.

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04 November 1974
Ivan Clayton,  (48)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Security man. Shot at the entrance to Club Bar, University Road, Belfast

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04 November 1976


Cornelius McCrory,   (17)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Found shot on the bank of the Forth River, Glencairn, Belfast.

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04 November 1981
Arthur Bettice,  (35)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Association (UDA),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot at his home, Silvio Street, Shankill, Belfast. Alleged informer

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04 November 1983


John Martin,  (28)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by time bomb, hidden in ceiling of classroom, which exploded during lecture to Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) members, Ulster Polytechnic, Jordanstown, County Antrim.

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04 November 1983


Stephen Fyfe,  (28)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by time bomb, hidden in ceiling of classroom, which exploded during lecture to Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) members, Ulster Polytechnic, Jordanstown, County Antrim.

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04 November 1983


William McDonald,  (29)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Injured by time bomb, hidden in ceiling of classroom, which exploded during lecture to Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) members, Ulster Polytechnic, Jordanstown, County Antrim. He died 12th August 1984.

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04 November 1992


Michael Gilbride,  (36)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot outside his parents’ home, Fernwood Street, Ballynafeigh, Belfast.

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