Tag Archives: Hugh Duffy,

22nd June – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

22nd June

——————————–

Saturday 22 June 1968

The Derry Housing Action Committee (DHAC) staged a protest by blocking the Lecky Road in the Bogside area of Derry

Monday 22 June 1970

Bernadette Devlin, then Member of Parliament (MP), lost her appeal against a six-month prison sentence imposed for taking part in riots in Derry. She was arrested on 26 June 1970.

Wednesday 22 June 1971

A system of committees to oversee control of key government departments was proposed by Brian Faulkner, then Northern Ireland Prime Minister. This system was seen as a way of providing a role for opposition parties at Stormont.

[The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) initially welcomed the proposal but events were to result in the withdrawal of the SDLP from Stormont.]

 Thursday 22 June 1972

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) announced that it would call a ceasefire from 26 June 1972 provided that there is a “reciprocal response” from the security forces.

At approximately 12.00 pm four men were shot and injured in the Glen Road area of west Belfast.

[On 1 December 2015 the PSNI listed this shooting as one of nine incidents it was investigating in relation to the activities of the British Army’s Military Reaction Force (MRF).]

military reaction force

See Military Reaction Force

Saturday 22 June 1974

A Catholic civilian was shot dead by a British soldier following an altercation in Olympic Drive, Strabane, County Tyrone.

[The following day the soldier involved in the shooting was charged with murder. This was the first British soldier to be charged with murder during the conflict.]

Daniel O’Connor

A Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) officer was shot dead by the Irish Republican Army (IRA) in Belfast.

A British soldier was shot dead by the IRA in Belfast

Sunday 22 June 1975

Hugh Brankin

A Catholic civilian was shot dead in an attack by the Protestant Action Force (PAF), which was a covername used by the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF), in Greenisland, County Antrim.

Another Catholic civilian died having been shot two days earlier in Fraser Street, Belfast. Two Protestant civilians were shot dead by Republican paramilitaries in an attack at Westland Road, Belfast.

A Catholic civilian was stabbed to death by Loyalists (paramilitaries?) in an attack at Baronrath Bridge, near Sallins, County Kildare, Republic of Ireland.

Monday 22 June 1981

Michael Devine, then an Irish National Liberation Army (INLA) prisoner, joined the hunger strike.

See Hungry Strikes

Thursday 22 June 1995

John Major, then British Prime Minister, came under continuing internal Conservative Party opposition to his leadership. In an effort to confront this opposition Major resigned as leader of the party but also announced that he would enter the resulting leadership contest.

Sunday 22 June 1997

Martin McGuinness, then Vice-President of Sinn Féin (SF), addressed SF’s annual Wolfe Tone commemoration and called for the “removal of decommissioning as an obstacle” to SF entering the all-party talks process.

There were a number of Orange Order parades across Northern Ireland, some of which were rerouted away from Nationalist areas. Marches passed off relatively peacefully in Bellaghy, County Derry, and Keady, County Armagh.

In Mountfield, County Tyrone, Orangemen accused the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) of capitulating to Nationalists.

The Orange Order warned that the peaceful parades did not mean that there would not be a stand-off at Drumcree on 6 July 1997 if the march was not allowed down the Garvaghy Road.

Monday 22 June 1998

It was reported that Ronnie Flanagan, then Chief Constable of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC), had said in an interview that he would be prepared to force the Drumcree march down the Garvaghy Road regardless of the decision of the Parades Commission.

[Flanagan later said the remarks had been taken out of context.]

Tuesday 22 June 1999

Bertie Ahern, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), said the Northern Ireland Executive must be established before paramilitary weapons were decommissioned. Ahern said it would be possible to persuade paramilitaries to disarm only “in the context of a confidence in functioning democratic institutions”.

David Trimble, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), called on Tony Blair, then British Prime Minister, to sack Marjorie (Mo) Mowlam, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland.

Patrick Magee, who had been convicted of taking part in the Brighton bombing on 12 October 1984, was freed under the terms of the Good Friday Agreement after serving 14 years of a 34 year sentence.

[Magee was the 277th prisoner to be released on licence under the terms of the early release scheme.]

Friday 22 June 2001

There was another Loyalist blockade of the road to the Catholic Holy Cross Girls’ Primary School in Ardoyne, north Belfast.

Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) officers again prevented children and parents from attempting to enter the school through the front gate. Some of the school’s pupils entered the school throught the grounds of another school.

——————————————

Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

10 People lost their lives on the 22nd  June between 1974 – 1979

——————————————

22 June 1974


Daniel O’Connor   (35)

Catholic
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot from passing car while on Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) foot patrol, junction of Crumlin Road and Clifton Park Avenue, Belfast.

——————————————

22 June 1974
Hugh Devine   (30)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot during altercation with British Army (BA) foot patrol, Olympic Drive, Ballycolman, Strabane, County Tyrone.

——————————————

22 June 1974
Kim Ian McCunn   (18)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while on British Army (BA) foot patrol, New Lodge Road, Belfast.

——————————————

22 June 1975


Hugh Brankin   (32)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Protestant Action Force (PAF)
Found shot on the road to Knockagh War Memorial, near Greenisland, County Antrim.

——————————————

22 June 1975


Hugh Duffy   (30)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Defence Association (UDA)
Died two days after being shot while walking home from work, Fraser Street, off Newtownards Road, Belfast.

——————————————

22 June 1975
Thomas Irvine   (23)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot from passing car while standing at Westland Road, Belfast.

——————————————

22 June 1975
Alan Raymond   (23)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot from passing car while standing at Westland Road, Belfast

——————————————

22 June 1975
Christopher Phelan   (48)

nfNIRI
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Found stabbed to death, by railway track, Baronrath Bridge, near Sallins, County Kildare.

——————————————

22 June 1977


John Millikin   (57)

Protestant
Status: Prison Officer (PO),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot from passing car shortly after leaving Crumlin Road Prison, Belfast.

——————————————

22 June 1979


John Scott   (49)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty reservist. Shot while delivering milk, Ardboe, near Coagh, County Tyrone.

——————————————

 

 

9th February – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

9th February

————————-

Tuesday 9 February 1971

Five men, two of them British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) engineers, the others construction workers, were killed near a BBC transmitter on Brougher Mountain, County Tyrone in a landmine attack carried out by the Irish Republican Army (IRA).

[It was believed that a British Army (BA) mobile patrol, which had been visiting the site, was the intended target.]

Wednesday 9 February 1972


William Craig, who had been Northern Ireland Minister for Home Affairs, launched ‘Ulster Vanguard’ as an umbrella movement for the right-ring of Unionism.

[The new group held a series of demonstrations and marches over next few months. These demonstrations intensified when Stormont was replaced and ‘direct rule’ introduced.]

A Report (Cmnd. 4901) was published by a committee headed by Lord Parker on the methods used by the security forces in to interogate those interned. The methods included: ‘in-depth interrogation’, hooding, food deprivation, use of ‘white noise’ to cause disorientation and sleep deprivation, and being forced to stand for long periods leaning against a wall with their finger-tips. Two members of the committee, including Lord Parker, held that the techniques were justified. Lord Gardiner disagreed.

Saturday 9 February 1974

  

Anthony O’Connor & Hugh Duffy

Two Catholic civilians were shot dead at O’Kane’s Bar, Grosvenor Road, Belfast, by Loyalist paramilitaries.

Sunday 9 February 1975

Two Catholic civilians, both aged 19, were shot dead by Loyalist paramilitaries as they left St Brigit’s Catholic Church, Malone, Belfast.

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) announced that it was reinstating its ceasefire for an indefinite period as of 6pm on 10 February 1975.

Monday 9 February 1976


Two Protestant civilians were shot dead by the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) in the Shankill area of Belfast. It was believed that the two men were mistaken for Catholics.

Monday 9 February 1981

Ian Paisley, then leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), and other senior members of the DUP held a rally at Belfast City Hall were they signed a covenant, the ‘Ulster Declaration’, based on the Ulster Covenant of 1912. Paisley also announced a ‘Carson Trail’ which was to be a series of protest rallies against the continuing dialogue between Margaret Thatcher, then British Prime Minister, and Charles Haughey, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister).

Friday 9 February 1990

Tommy Lyttle, then leader of the Ulster Defence Association (UDA), appeared in court on charges of having a threatening letter sent to the sister of Brian Nelson.

Amnesty International published a report which claimed that there was “mounting evidence” of collusion between the security forces and Loyalist paramilitaries. The RUC said that the claims were “utter nonsense”.

Thursday 9 February 1995

Sinn Féin (SF) called off a planned meeting with Northern Ireland Office (NIO) officials after the party claimed that the room where the meeting was to have taken place was bugged.

Friday 9 February 1996

End of IRA Ceasefire
The Irish Republican Army (IRA) exploded a large bomb at South Quay in the Docklands area of London. The lorry bomb killed two people, injured many more, caused millions of pounds worth of damage, and marked the end of the IRA ceasefire after 17 months and 9 days. A statement had been issued by the IRA one hour before the explosion occurred at 7.01pm.

See Docklands bombing

Monday 9 February 1998

Brendan Campbell (30), a Catholic civilian, was shot dead outside a restaurant on the Lisburn Road, Belfast. Campbell was alleged to be a drugs dealer and the group called Direct Action Against Drugs (DAAD) claimed responsibility.

[Many people believed that DAAD was a cover name (pseudonym) used by the Irish Republican Army (IRA). The killing of Campbell (and Robert Dougan on 10 February 1998) led to the expulsion of Sinn Féin (SF) from the multi-party talks on 20 February 1998.]

A political row broke out between Ken Maginnis, then Security spokesperson for the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), and Marjorie (Mo) Mowlam, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland.

In a letter to David Trimble, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), Mowlam demanded an apology from Maginnis for allegedly calling her “a damned liar” during a session of the talks at Stormont. Maginnis said he had “no intention whatsoever” of apologising.

In another row, involving Sinn Féin (SF) and the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), John Hume, then leader of the SDLP, defended his party colleague, Seamus Mallon, from accusations by Republicans that his attitude at the talks had been “extremely unhelpful”.
The British government published proposals, Your Voice Your Choice, for reforms to the Northern Ireland Police Authority (NIPA).
The Standing Advisory Commission on Human Rights (SACHR) submitted a report to Marjorie (Mo) Mowlam, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, expressing concern about the continuing high levels of Catholic unemployment despite the introduction of two Fair Employment acts. The report entitled Employment Equality: Building for the Future examined the effectiveness of fair employment legislation and the impact of government policy. Figures on unemployment showed that Catholics continued to be twice as likely to be unemployed as Protestants.
A number of UUP members, who opposed the party’s involvement in the multi-party talks, established a new pressure group called the ‘Committee for Traditional Ulster Unionist Values’. The new grouping was led by Nelson McCausland.

Tuesday 9 February 1999

The Orange Volunteers (OV) admitted carrying out an attack on a Catholic owned public house in Castledawson, County Derry.

The Belfast Telegraph (a Belfast based newspaper) published the results of an opinion poll. The poll showed that, of those questioned, 50 per cent believed that the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) should join Sinn Féin (SF) in a power-sharing Executive even without prior decommissioning.

Tuesday 9 February 1999

A middle-aged man discovered an unexploded pipe-bomb outside a public house in Crumlin, County Antrim. The Loyalist paramilitary group the Orange Volunteers (OV) claimed they had targeted the bar.

Saturday 9 February 2002

An estimated 80 people were involved in rioting in the Whitewell Road area of north Belfast. The disturbances broke out in the Arthur Bridge, Longlands estate, and Gunnell Hill areas along the Whitewell Road and eight petrol bombs were thrown. One man was arrested on suspicion of riotous behaviour.

[There were further disturbances in the area on Sunday evening (10 February 2002) and again on Monday morning (11 February 2002).]

A gun was found close to Coronation Park, Aughnacloy, County Tyrone. The main Aughnacloy to Monaghan road was closed for a while on both sides of the Northern Ireland border while the security alert was on-going.

The Executive committee of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) held a meeting at which it was decided to seek an increase in affiliation fees from the Orange Order. It was believed that the UUP would be seeking £12,000 per annum. The Orange Order has 120 of the 860 seats on the Ulster Unionist Council (UUC) which is the policy making body of the UUP.

————————————————————————

Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following  people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live  forever

– To  the Paramilitaries  –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

17 People   lost their lives on the 9th  February  between  1971 – 1998

  —————————————————————————

09 February 1971


 John Eakins,   (52)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed while travelling in Landrover, which detonated landmine on track, Brougher Mountain, near Trillick, County Tyrone. British Army (BA) mobile patrol intended target.

  —————————————————————————

09 February 1971


William Thomas,  (35)

nfNI
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed while travelling in Landrover, which detonated landmine on track, Brougher Mountain, near Trillick, County Tyrone. British Army (BA) mobile patrol intended target.

  —————————————————————————

09 February 1971
 Harry Edgar,  (26)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed while travelling in Landrover, which detonated landmine on track, Brougher Mountain, near Trillick, County Tyrone. British Army (BA) mobile patrol intended target.

  —————————————————————————

09 February 1971
David Henson,  (24)

nfNI
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Englishman temporarily working in Northern Ireland. Killed while travelling in Landrover, which detonated landmine on track, Brougher Mountain, near Trillick, County Tyrone. British Army (BA) mobile patrol intended target.

  —————————————————————————

09 February 1971


George Beck,   (43)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed while travelling in Landrover, which detonated landmine on track, Brougher Mountain, near Trillick, County Tyrone. British Army (BA) mobile patrol intended target.

  —————————————————————————

09 February 1972
Patrick Casey,  (26)

Catholic
Status: non-specific Republican group (REP),

Killed by: non-specific Republican group (REP)
Died three days after being injured in an explosion at temporary council offices in school hall, Keady, County Armagh. Explosion occurred 6 February 1972.

  —————————————————————————

09 February 1974


Anthony O’Connor,   (42)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot while leaving O’Kane’s Bar, Grosvenor Road, Belfast.

  —————————————————————————

09 February 1974


Hugh Duffy,  (24)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot while leaving O’Kane’s Bar, Grosvenor Road, Belfast.

  —————————————————————————

09 February 1975
Kevin Ballantine,   (19)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Shot as he left St Brigid’s Roman Catholic Church, Derryvolgie Avenue, Malone, Belfast.

  —————————————————————————

09 February 1975
Gerard Kiely,  (19)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Shot as he left St Brigid’s Roman Catholic Church, Derryvolgie Avenue, Malone, Belfast

  —————————————————————————

09 February 1976


Archibald Hanna,   (51)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot while sitting in stationary lorry outside newsagent’s shop, Cambrai Street, Shankill, Belfast. Assumed to be a Catholic.

  —————————————————————————

09 February 1976


Raymond Carlisle,  (27)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot while sitting in stationary lorry outside newsagent’s shop, Cambrai Street, Shankill, Belfast. Assumed to be a Catholic.

  —————————————————————————

09 February 1989

Anthony Fusco,  (33)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot while walking to his workplace, West Street, Smithfield, Belfast.

  —————————————————————————

09 February 1993


Michael Beswick,  (21)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by remote controlled bomb hidden in wall, detonated when British Army (BA) foot patrol passed, Cathedral Road, Armagh.

  —————————————————————————

09 February 1996


Inan Ul-Haq Bashir,   (29)

nfNIB
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in lorry bomb explosion, left in car park, South Quay railway station, Isle of Dogs, London. Inadequate warning given.

See Docklands bombing

  —————————————————————————

09 February 1996


John Jefferies,  (31)

nfNIB
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in lorry bomb explosion, left in car park, South Quay railway station, Isle of Dogs, London. Inadequate warning given.

See Docklands bombing

  —————————————————————————

09 February 1998
Brendan Campbell  (30)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot, shortly after leaving Planks Restaurant, Brookland Street, off Lisburn Road, Belfast.

  —————————————————————————