Tag Archives: David Thompson

5th August – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

5th August

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

Thursday 5 August 1971

There was a debate at Westminster on the situation in Northern Ireland. Brian Faulkner, then Northern Ireland Prime Minister, met with Edward Heath, then British Prime Minister, and Harry Tuzo, then General Officer Commanding the British Army (BA), in London to discuss the security situation.

5th August 1969

The UVF planted their first bomb in the Republic of Ireland , damaging the RTE Television Centre in Dublin

 

Sunday 5 August 1973

        

Francis & Bernadette Mullen

A Catholic husband and wife, Francis Mullan (59) and Bernadette Mullan (39), were found shot dead at their farmhouse near Moy, County Tyrone.

They had been killed by an unidentified Loyalist paramilitary group.

Friday 5 August 1977

There was a series of fire bomb attacks in Belfast and Lisburn, County Antrim.

Wednesday 5 August 1981

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) carried out a series of car bomb and incendiary bomb attacks in seven areas of Northern Ireland including Belfast, Derry and Lisburn. The attacks caused serious damage to property and minor injuries to a number of people.

Friday 5 August 1983

The ‘supergrass’ trial of 38 alleged members of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) ended in Belfast. The trial had lasted 120 days with most of the evidence being offered by IRA supergrass Christopher Black.

I.R.A supergrass Christopher Black

The judge jailed 22 of the accused to sentences totalling more that 4,000 years. Four people were acquitted and others received suspended sentences.

In 1986, 18 of the 22 who received prison sentences had their convictions quashed by the Court of Appeal.

Tuesday 5 August 1986

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) issued another warning that contractors who were carrying out work for the security services in Northern Ireland would be considered ‘part of the war machine’ and would be ‘treated as collaborators’.

Monday 5 August 1996

A meeting between the Apprentice Boys of Derry and the Bogside Residents Association ended without agreement about the march due to take place on 10 August 1996. A series of meetings between the two groups had been chaired by the local Member of Parliament John Hume, then leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP).

Tuesday 5 August 1997

A Catholic taxi driver survived an attempt to kill him when the gun being used by a Loyalist paramilitary jammed.

The attack occurred in the Parkmore estate in Lurgan.

The Loyalist Volunteer Force (LVF) later claimed responsibility for the attack.

A hoax bomb was sent to Sammy Wilson, then a Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) councillor, at Belfast City Hall.

Marjorie (Mo) Mowlam, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, held her first meeting with Gerry Adams, then President of Sinn Féin (SF), since the Irish Republican Army (IRA) announced its renewed ceasefire.

The Irish Times carried a report that John Hume, then leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), was considering accepting the position of President of the Republic of Ireland as an agreed all-party candidate. Hume did not comment on the story.

The Bogside Residents Group (BRG) gave agreement to the planned Apprentice Boys of Derry (ABD) march in the city on 9 August 1997. This followed the news that the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) would reroute a number of ABD ‘feeder’ parades in other Nationalist areas of Northern Ireland.

Thursday 5 August 1999

Two pipe-bombs were discovered by the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) in a hedge in Glengormley, County Antrim. Police made the discovery at 2.45am during a search carried out at the junction between Elmfield Crescent and Elmfield Road in the town.

A report of the Victims’ Commission, established by the Irish government, into the 1974 Dublin and Monaghan bombings recommended the appointment of a former Supreme Court judge to inquire privately into events surrounding the bombings which killed 33 people and injured over 400.

Although it was intended that the findings would eventually be made public, the families of the victims wanted the immediate establishment of a public tribunal of Inquiry.

Other recommendations of the report were that a similar Inquiry be established into the killing of Seamus Ludlow on 2 May 1976, and that the Irish government should make a £10,000 payment to the 150 families affected by the bombings.

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

5  People lost their lives on the 5th August   between 1973 – 1994

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 05 August 1973

Francis Mullen,   (59)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Found shot at his farmhouse, Gorestown, near Moy, County Tyrone.

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 05 August 1973

Bernadette Mullen,   (39)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Found shot at her farmhouse, Gorestown, near Moy, County Tyrone.

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 05 August 1974

Martha Lavery,   (67)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot while in her home during gun battle between Irish Republican Army (IRA) and British Army (BA), Jamaica Street, Ardoyne, Belfast.

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 05 August 1991

Eric Boyd,  (42)

Protestant
Status: ex-Ulster Defence Regiment (xUDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot shortly after leaving his workplace, while driving along Altmore Road, Cappagh, County Tyrone.

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 05 August 1994

David Thompson,  (48)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Found shot, Ballyhill Lane, Nutts Corner, near Crumlin, County Antrim.

3rd June – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

  

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

3rd June

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Monday 3 June 1974

Michael Gaughan, a member of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) who had been on hunger strike in Parkhurst Prison, England, died after refusing food for 64 days.

A Catholic civilian was found shot dead in Belfast; Loyalists were responsible for the killing.

Tuesday 3 June 1975

               

David Thompson   Alfred Doyle      John Presha

Two Protestant civilians and an off-duty member of the Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR) were found shot dead in a car in Killeen, County Armagh. Republican paramilitaries were responsible for the killings.

Monday 3 June 1991

Undercover British Army soldiers, believed to be members of the Special Air Service (SAS), shot dead three Irish Republican Army (IRA) men as they travelled in a car near Coagh, County Tyrone.

Approximately 200 shots were fired by the SAS soldiers at the car. Two rifles were later recovered from the car

See Loughgall ambush

See Operation Flavius

Tuesday 3 June 1997

Stormont Talks Resumed

The multi-party talks resumed at Stormont following a break to allow the local government elections to be contested on 20 May 1997.

The Loyalist Volunteer Force (LVF) and the Continuity Irish Republican Army (CIRA) were both proscribed (declared illegal organisations).

15 LVF prisoners began a hunger strike at the Maze Prison in protest at what they alleged was maltreatment by the prison authorities.

Marjorie (Mo) Mowlam, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, was heckled when she addressed the Northern Ireland Police Federation annual conference in Newcastle, County Down. Les Rodgers, then Chairman of the Police Federation, criticised the Labour governments plans for reform of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC).

Rodgers also criticised some Unionist politicians for “mindless incitement” which he believed had led to violence against RUC officers including the attack on Gregory Taylor on 1 June 1997.

Roisín McAliskey, then being held awaiting a decision about extradition, was granted bail so as to allow her to be moved to a secure unit of Mandsley psychiatric hospital. McAliskey was reported as suffering from depression

Wednesday 3 June 1998

The Irish Times (a Republic of Ireland newspaper) carried a report on the death, due to cancer, of Robin Jackson on Saturday 30 May 1998. The report claimed that Jackson was the infamous Loyalist killer of the 1970s and 1980s known as ‘The Jackal’.

The report stated that he had been commander of the Mid-Ulster Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) from 1972 to the 1990s and had been responsible for the deaths of dozens of Catholic civilians.

Jackson was also implicated in the Dublin and Monaghan Bombings in May 1974 which resulted in the deaths of 33 civilians.

Dublin and Monaghan bombings victim

See Dublin & Monaghan Bombings

The British government issued a press release naming the members of the Independent Commission on Policing in Northern Ireland.

[There were reports that both the Irish government and the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) were upset that none of their preferred nominations for the Commission had been accepted by the British government.]

Saturday 3 June 2000

Ronnie Flanagan, then Chief Constable of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC), announced that 500 British Army soliders were to be withdrawn from Northern Ireland.

The latest reduction in troops was believed to bring the number down to 13,500, the lowest level since 1970.

[Troop levels were increased again at the beginning of July 2000 in response to Loyalist violence at Drumcree.]

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

15 People lost their lives on the 3rd  June  between 1973 – 1991

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03 June 1973


Sarah McComb   (41)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot while in friend’s house, Druse Street, Lower Oldpark, Belfast.

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03 June 1973


Alfred Acheson   (48) Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ), Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot while in friend’s house, Druse Street, Lower Oldpark, Belfast.

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03 June 1974


Michael Gaughan   (24)

nfNIB
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: not known (nk)
Originally from County Mayo. Died on 65th day of hunger strike, in Parkhurst Prison, Isle of Wight, England

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03 June 1974
John McLaughlin  (19)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Found shot in quarry, Hightown Road, near Belfast, County Antrim.

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03 June 1975


David Thompson  (34)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Found shot in his car, Killeen, County Armagh.

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03 June 1975


Alfred Doyle  (24)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off Duty. Found shot in David Thompson’s car, Killeen, County Armagh.

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03 June 1975


John Presha   (30)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Found shot in David Thompson’s car, Killeen, County Armagh.

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03 June 1978
Daniel McErlean   (25)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Found shot, Edenappa, near Jonesborough, County Armagh. Allegedly involved in crime.

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03 June 1979


Stanley Hanna  (47)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by land mine while on Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) mobile patrol, Cullaville, near Crossmaglen, County Armagh.

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03 June 1979


Kevin Thompson  (22)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by land mine while on Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) mobile patrol, Cullaville, near Crossmaglen, County Armagh.

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03 June 1981
Joseph Lynn   (60)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot during sniper attack on British Army (BA) foot patrol, Central Drive, Creggan, Derry.

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03 June 1984
Hugh Gallagher   (26)

Catholic
Status: ex-Ulster Defence Regiment (xUDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Taxi driver. Found shot in his car, Faccary Road, Loughmacrory, near Omagh, County Tyrone.

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03 June 1991


Peter Ryan  (35)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot during ambush by undercover British Army (BA) members, while driving through Coagh, County Tyrone.

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03 June 1991


Lawrence  McNally   (39)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot during ambush by undercover British Army (BA) members, while driving through Coagh, County Tyrone.

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03 June 1991


Anthony Doris  (22)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot during ambush by undercover British Army (BA) members, while driving through Coagh, County Tyrone.

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17th October – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

 17th October

Sunday 17 October 1971

A British soldier was killed by the Irish Republican Army (IRA) in Belfast. Another soldier died two days after he was mortally wounded.

A Catholic man was shot dead by the British Army in Belfast. It was estimated that approximately 16,000 households were withholding rent and rates for council houses as part of the campaign of civil disobedience organised by the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP). The campaign was in protest against Internment and had begun on 15 August 1971.

Tuesday 17 October 1972

The Ulster Defence Association (UDA) opened fire on the British Army in several areas of Belfast.

Saturday 17 October 1981

Stewart Pringle

Stewart Pringle, then Commandant-General of the Royal Marines, was badly injured when the Irish Republican Army (IRA) exploded a bomb under his car.

Tuesday 17 October 1995

Anthony Lake, then United States National Security Adviser, held a meeting with Patrick Mayhew, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, and Michael Ancram, then Political Development Minister at the Northern Ireland Office (NIO). Patrica Campbell, then a Catholic member of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) who had been a former assistant to James Molyneaux, lodged an employment discrimination case with the Fair Employment Commission (FEC) against the UUP.

Thursday 17 October 1996

David Trimble, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), met with John Major, then British Prime Minister, at Downing Street, London.

Friday 17 October 1997

Parades Commission Announced Marjorie (Mo) Mowlam, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, gave a speech at the Jordanstown campus of the University of Ulster during which she outlined the remit of the Parades Commission. Despite early speculation it was announced that the new commission would not cover other expressions of cultural identity such as Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) sporting activities. Resident groups and the Loyal Orders criticised various aspects of the Parades Commission in particular the membership of the commission and its powers.

David Ervine, then a spokesperson for the Progressive Unionist Party (PUP), and Garry McMichael, then spokesperson for the Ulster Democratic Party (UDP), began a speaking tour of the United States of America (USA).

Sunday 17 October 1999

A number of homes were evacuated in the Cliftondene Crescent area of north Belfast as part of a security alert. A pipe-bomb was later found and made safe. Lord Grey of Naunton died aged 89. He had been the last British Governor of Northern Ireland and had served in the post from 1968 until direct rule was imposed on 30 March 1972.

Wednesday 17 October 2001

Loyalist paramilitaries exploded a bomb close to where parents and children were returning from the Holy Cross Girls’ Primary School on the Ardoyne Road, north Belfast. The bomb had been placed at the rear of a house on Alliance Avenue and it exploded at 3.10pm (15.10BST) causing extensive damage to the house. No one was injured but the householder, and a number of parents and children, were described as being in “shock”.

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following  people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die.”
Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live  forever

– To  the Paramilitaries  –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

8 People lost their lives on the 17th  October  between 1971– 1988

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17 October 1971


Graham Cox,   (35) nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died two days after being shot by sniper while travelling in British Army (BA) Armoured Personnel Carrier, Oldpark Road, Belfast.

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17 October 1971


George Hamilton,  (21) nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while on British Army (BA) foot patrol, Glenalina Park, Ballymurphy, Belfast.

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17 October 1971


David Thompson,  (38)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot as he stood at the corner of Seaforde Street and Sheriff Street, Short Strand, Belfast.

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17 October 1972
Eleanor Cooke,   (32)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot during street disturbances near to her home, Bracken Street, Shankill, Belfast.

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17 October 1972
John Todd, (23)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Association (UDA),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Also off duty Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR) member. Shot during street disturbances, Wilton Street, Shankill, Belfast.

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17 October 1975


John Greer,  (30)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Taxi driver. Shot when he arrived at house to pick up passenger, Cavehill Road, Belfast. Assumed to be a Catholic.

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17 October 1976
Bernard McCarron,  (45)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Found shot and badly beaten, Richmond Street, Shankill, Belfast

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17 October 1988
Norman McKeown,   (39)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by booby trap bomb attached to his car outside his home, Dunleady Park, Dundonald, Belfast. His employer contractor to Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC).

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