Tag Archives: Bernard Watt

6th February – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

6th February

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Thursday 6 February 1969

The New Ulster Movement (NUM) was formed. This pressure group was established to promote moderate and non-sectarian policies and to assist those candidates who supported Terence O’Neill, then Northern Ireland Prime Minister, in the election on 24 February 1969.

Saturday 6 February 1971

First Soldier Killed The Irish Republican Army (IRA) shot and killed Gunner Robert Curtis, the first British soldier to die during the current conflict. Bernard Watt (28), a Catholic civilian, was shot and killed by the British Army (BA) during street disturbances in Ardoyne, Belfast. James Saunders (22), a member of the IRA, was shot and killed by the British Army during a gun battle near the Oldpark Road, Belfast.

Sunday 6 February 1972

A Civil Rights march held in Newry, County Down. There was a very large turn-out for the march with many people attending to protest at the killings in Derry the previous Sunday.

Tuesday 6 February 1973

Although a number of ‘moderate’ Unionist politicians called on people not to heed the call by the United Loyalist Council (ULC) for a region wide strike, by the evening cuts in the electricity supply began to affect Belfast.

 The ULC strike officially began on 7 February 1973.

Wednesday 6 February 1974

 Sunningdale; Ulster Workers’ Council Strike

Friday 6 February 1976

Two Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) officers were shot dead by the Irish Republican Army (IRA) at Cliftonville Circus, Belfast. A Protestant civilian died then days after being shot by Republicans in Belfast.

Friday 6 February 1981

‘Firearm Certificates Protest’ Ian Paisley, then leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), led a group of 500 men up a hillside in County Antrim at night. Those taking part in the gathering were photographed holding firearms certificates above their head.

[Firearm certificates are issued by the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) to those people who possess legally held firearms. The implication of the demonstration was that those taking part could as easily have been holding their weapons above their head.]

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) bombed and sunk a British coal boat, Nellie M, off the coast at Moville, County Donegal, Republic of Ireland

Thursday 6 February 1992

Albert Reynolds was elected as leader of Fianna Fáil (FF) and also became Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister).

Friday 6 February 1998

It was reported in the Irish Times (a Republic of Ireland newspaper) that the British government would not implement proposals which would reduce the number of legally-held firearms in Northern Ireland. The report suggested that Unionist politicians had lobbied hard to have the proposals shelved.

It is estimated that there are 87,017 firearms certificates issued in Northern Ireland which cover 134,086 weapons. The Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) state that 80 per cent of the weapons are shotguns and air guns while the remainder are personal protection weapons. There are no figures for the religious breakdown of the ownership of weapons but it is generally thought that the vast majority of weapons are held by Protestants.

Saturday 6 February 1999

Concern was expressed for the future of the peace process with Marjorie (Mo) Mowlam, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, conceding that the deadline for the devolution of powers could be missed. Roberty McCartney, then Leader of the United Kingdom Unionist Party (UKUP), warned that North-South bodies could remain in place even if the Northern Ireland Assembly collapsed.

The Association of Garda Síochána (the Irish police) Superintendents announced that it was planning to meet the Minister for Justice to discuss the decision of the prosecution to accept a manslaughter plea in the Jerry McCabe case.

Wednesday 6 February 2002

Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) officers arrested a man (33) under the Terrorism Act. He was arrested at the request of Metropolitan Police and was taken to a central London police station. It was believed that he was questioned about bombs in Birmingham, Ealing, and west London, during 2001.

The Northern Ireland Policing Board (NIPB) appointed a four man committee to continue the work began on Tuesday 5 February 2002 on the reports of the investigation into the Omagh bombing (15 August 1998). Some of the relatives of those killed in the Omagh bomb called for an outside police officer to take charge of a fresh investigation.

[This was one recommendation of Nuala O’Loan, then Police Ombudsman for Northern Ireland (PONI), but was opposed by the Chief Constable.]

David Trimble (UUP), then First Minister, and Mark Durkan (SDLP), then Deputy First Minister, opened the Northern Ireland Bureau in Washington, United States of America (USA). The office was established to promote Northern Ireland in the USA.

[There was some criticism of the cost of the new office. A Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) Member of the Legislative Assembly (MLA) who visited the office criticised the lack of a Union flag in the office.]

A man was shot in the leg in a paramilitary ‘punishment’ attack in Dundonald, east Belfast. Allied Irish Banks announced that it had been the victim of a $750m (£529m) fraud at its US subsidiary.

 

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following  people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live  forever

– To  the Paramilitaries  –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

12  People   lost their lives on the 6th February  between  1971 – 1989

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06 February 1971


Bernard Watt,  (28)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot during street disturbances, Chatham Street, Ardoyne, Belfast.

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06 February 1971


James Saunders,  (22)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot during gun battle, Louisa Street, off Oldpark Road, Belfast.

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06 February 1971


Robert Curtis,  (20)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while on British Army (BA) foot patrol, New Lodge Road, Belfast

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06 February 1972


David Seaman,  (31)

nfNI
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: not known (nk)
Englishman also known as Barry Barber. Found shot, Cullaville, near Crossmaglen, County Armagh.

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06 February 1973
Michael Murtagh,  (22)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in rocket attack on British Army (BA) Armoured Personnel Carrier, Servia Street, Lower Falls, Belfast.

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06 February 1975
Colette Brown,   (31)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Found shot by the side of Killyglen Road, Larne, County Antrim.

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06 February 1976


 James Blakely,  (42)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot while on Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) foot patrol, Cliftonville Road, Belfast

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06 February 1976


William  Murtagh,  (31)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot while on Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) foot patrol, Cliftonville Road, Belfast. He died on 7 February 1976

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06 February 1976
John McCready, (57)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Republican group (REP)
Died ten days after being shot from passing car, while walking along Charnwood Avenue, off Cavehill Road, Belfast.

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06 February 1976
Thomas Quinn,  (55)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Abducted while walking along Millfield, Belfast. Found stabbed to death on grass bank, off Forthriver Way, Glencairn, Belfast, on 7 February 1976.

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06 February 1981


Charles Lewis,   (36)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot while standing outside shop, while on Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) foot patrol, Balmoral Avenue, Malone, Belfast

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06 February 1989


 James Connolly,  (20)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died in premature explosion while planting booby trap bomb under Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) member’s car outside his home, Drumquin, County Tyrone.

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