Tag Archives: Anthony Daly

20th July – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

20th July

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Saturday 20 July 1974

The Ulster Defence Association (UDA) stepped down as a member of the Ulster Workers’ Council (UWC) and the Ulster Loyalist Central Co-ordinating Committee. The UDA also issued an invitation to representatives of the Catholic community to hold talks with them.

[On 1 August 1974 representatives of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) held talks with the UDA.]

Sunday 20 July 1980

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) planted a car bomb in Lisnaskea, County Fermanagh, which caused extensive damage to the centre of the town.

Tuesday 20 July 1982

Hyde Park and Regent’s Park Bombs

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) exploded two bombs in London, one at South Carriage Drive, close to Hyde Park and the other at the Bandstand in Regent’s Park, resulting in the deaths of 11 British Soldiers.

The first bomb exploded shortly before 11.00am when soldiers of the Blues and Royals were travelling on horseback to change the guard at Horseguards Parade. Three soldiers were killed instantly and a fourth died of his injuries on 23 July 1982. A number of civilians who had been watching the parade were also injured.

Hyde_Park_Bombing

One horse was killed in the explosion but a further six had to be shot due to their injuries. The bomb had been left in a car parked along the side of the road and is believed to have been detonated by a member of the IRA who was watching from within Hyde Park.

The second bomb, which exploded at lunch time, had been planted under the bandstand in Regent’s Park. The explosion killed 7 bandsmen of the Royal Green Jackets as they were performing a concert at the open-air bandstand.

Approximately two dozen civilians who had been listening to the performance were injured in the explosion. It is thought that the bomb had been triggered by a timing device and may have been planted some time in advance of the concert.

[British public opinion was outraged by the carnage caused by the IRA attacks.

In 1987 a man was sentenced to 25 years for conspiracy to cause explosions; the charges were linked to the Hyde Park bomb. He was released in 1998 under the terms of the Good Friday Agreement. In December 1998 he sucessfully appealed against his conviction which was quashed.]

See Hyde Park & Regents Park Bombings

Friday 20 July 1990

IRA Bomb Stock Exchange

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) exploded a large bomb at the London Stock Exchange causing massive damage.

Sunday 20 July 1997

Renewed IRA Ceasefire

At 12.00pm the renewed Irish Republican Army (IRA) ceasefire began. There was a report in the Sunday Tribune (a Dublin newspaper) which claimed that the IRA ceasefire would be limited to four months duration dependant on progress during the talks

 Sinn Féin (SF) later denied there was any truth in the report

[While most people welcomed the renewed ceasefire, Unionist politicians were highly sceptical of the intentions of the Republican movement.]

Tuesday 20 July 1999

Bertie Ahern, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), attempted to mend deteriorating relations with David Trimble, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), at informal talks in London.

A meeting between Ahern and Tony Blair, then British Prime Minister, was also arranged to confirm that George Mitchell would chair the review of the implementation of the Good Friday Agreement, triggered by the failure to establish the Executive. Within an hour of the announcement Mitchell held a meeting with Trimble. Mitchell later stated that the review “would be tightly focused” and aimed at “a speedy conclusion”.

[The review began on 6 September 1999.]

There was an announcement that the start of the main hearings of the Bloody Sunday Inquiry would be delayed by six months from 27 September 1999 to 27 March 2000. The delay was blamed on impending court cases.

Edward_Daly_Bloody_Sunday

See Bloody Sunday

  

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

16 People lost their lives on the 20th July between 1972  – 1982

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20 July 1972
Robert Leggett   (50)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot attempting to stop bomb attack on his shop, Springfield Road, Belfast.

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20 July 1973
Richard Jarman  (37)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by booby trap bomb while on British Army (BA) foot patrol, Middletown, County Armagh.

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20 July 1973
Sidney Watt  (36)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Shot outside his home, Ballintemple, near Meigh, County Armagh.

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20 July 1974
Daniel Harkin  (47)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: not known (nk)
Died of head injuries, shortly after being attacked, in the back garden of his home, Meenashesk Place, Strabane, County Tyrone.

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20 July 1974


Brian Shaw   (21)

nfNI
Status: ex-British Army (xBA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Married to Northern Irish women. Found shot in derelict house, Arundel Street, off Grosvenor Road, Belfast.

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20 July 1982
Anthony Daly   (23)

nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Ceremonial Cavalryman. Killed when remote controlled car bomb exploded while riding horse along South Carriage Drive, Hyde Park, London.

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20 July 1982
Simon Tipper   (19)

nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Ceremonial Cavalryman. Killed when remote controlled car bomb exploded while riding horse along South Carriage Drive, Hyde Park, London.

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20 July 1982
Jeffrey Young  (19)

nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Ceremonial Cavalryman. Killed when remote controlled car bomb exploded while riding horse along South Carriage Drive, Hyde Park, London.

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20 July 1982
Roy Bright  (36)

nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Ceremonial Cavalryman. Injured when remote controlled car bomb exploded while riding horse along South Carriage Drive, Hyde Park, London. He died on 23 July 1982.

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20 July 1982
Graham Barker  (36)

nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Bandsman. Killed when bomb exploded at bandstand, Regents Park, London.

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20 July 1982
Robert Livingstone  (31)

nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Bandsman. Killed when bomb exploded at bandstand, Regents Park, London.

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20 July 1982
John McKnight   (30)

nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Bandsman. Killed when bomb exploded at bandstand, Regents Park, London.

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20 July 1982
George Mesure   (19)

nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Bandsman. Killed when bomb exploded at bandstand, Regents Park, London.

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20 July 1982


Keith Powell   (24)

nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA), K

illed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Bandsman. Killed when bomb exploded at bandstand, Regents Park, London

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20 July 1982
Laurence Smith  (19)

nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Bandsman. Killed when bomb exploded at bandstand, Regents Park, London.

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20 July 1982
John Heritage  (29)

nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Bandsman. Injured when bomb exploded at bandstand, Regents Park, London. He died on 1 August 1982

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Hyde Park & Regent’s Park Bombings – 20th July 1982 – Lest We Forget!

 

 Hyde Park and Regent’s Park Bombings

Hyde Park

Regents Park

The Hyde Park and Regent’s Park bombings occurred on 20 July 1982 in London. Members of the Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA) detonated two bombs during British military ceremonies in Hyde Park and Regent’s Park, both in central London.

Soldiers injured in the bombing are pictured following the attack

 

The explosions killed 11 military personnel:  four soldiers of the Blues & Royals at Hyde Park, and seven bandsmen of the Royal Green Jackets at Regent’s Park. Seven of the Blues & Royals’ horses also died in the attack. One seriously injured horse, Sefton, survived and was subsequently featured on television programmes and was awarded “Horse of the Year“.

McNamee

Gilbert “Danny” McNamee

In 1987, Gilbert “Danny” McNamee was convicted of making the Hyde Park bomb and jailed for 25 years.  He served 12 years before being released under the terms of the Good Friday Agreement; his conviction was later quashed.

John Downey

In 2013, John Downey was charged with four counts of murder in relation to the Hyde Park attack; his trial began in January 2014 but collapsed the following month after a ruling upon a letter sent to him by police assuring him that he would not be prosecuted over the attack.

No one has ever been charged in connection with the Regent’s Park bombing

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Hyde park London 1982 IRA bombing

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The attacks

Hyde Park bomb

 

U-shaped hedge enclosure surrounding an oblong slate plaque on a wedge-shaped plinth, with flowers laid at the bottom
Memorial in Hyde Park
Oblong slate plaque with inscriptions in gold, set into a low wall
Memorial in Regent’s Park

At 10:40 am, a nail bomb exploded in the boot of a blue Morris Marina parked on South Carriage Drive in Hyde Park.The bomb comprised 25 lb (11 kg) of gelignite and 30 lb (14 kg) of nails.

It exploded as soldiers of the Household Cavalry, Queen Elizabeth II‘s official bodyguard regiment, were passing. They were taking part in their daily Changing of the Guard procession from their barracks in Knightsbridge to Horse Guards Parade.

Blues and Royals cap badge.jpg

Three soldiers of the Blues & Royals were killed outright, and another, their standard-bearer, died from his wounds three days later. The other soldiers in the procession were badly wounded, and a number of civilians were injured. Seven of the regiment’s horses were also killed or had to be euthanised because of their injuries.

Explosives experts believed that the Hyde Park bomb was triggered by remote by an IRA member inside the park.

 Anthony Daley, Simon Tipper & Roy Bright

The four men who died in the attack were Denis Anthony Daly (known as Anthony Daly), Simon Tipper, Vernon Young, and Raymond Bright (in hospital three days later).

The seven horses who died in the attack were Cedric, Epaulette, Falcon, Rochester, Waterford, Yeastvite, and Zara.

 

Regent’s Park Bomb

The second attack happened at about 12:55 pm,when a bomb exploded underneath a bandstand in Regent’s Park. Thirty Military bandsmen of the Royal Green Jackets were on the stand performing music from Oliver! to a crowd of 120 people.

It was the first in a series of advertised lunchtime concerts there.Six of the bandsmen were killed outright and the rest were wounded; a seventh died of his wounds on 1 August. The seven men who died were Graham Barker, Robert Livingstone, John McKnight, John Heritage, George Mesure, Keith Powell and Laurence Smith. At least eight civilians were also injured.

The bomb had been hidden under the stand some time before and triggered by a timer.  Unlike the Hyde Park bomb, it contained no nails and seemed to be designed to cause minimal harm to bystanders.

Aftermath

A total of 22 people were detained in hospital as a result of the blasts: 18 soldiers, a police officer, and three civilians. The IRA claimed responsibility for the attacks by deliberately mirroring Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher‘s words a few months before when Britain entered the Falklands War. They proclaimed that:

“The Irish people have sovereign and national rights which no task or occupational force can put down”.

Reacting to the bombing, Thatcher stated:

“These callous and cowardly crimes have been committed by evil, brutal men who know nothing of democracy. We shall not rest until they are brought to justice.”

The bombings had a negative impact on public support in the United States for the Irish republican cause.

Sefton, a horse that survived the attack at Hyde Park despite suffering serious wounds, became famous after appearing in many television shows and was awarded Horse of the Year.

Sefton_Horse_of_the_Year

Sefton’s rider at the time of the bombing, Michael Pedersen, survived but claimed to suffer from posttraumatic stress disorder; after splitting from his wife he committed suicide in September 2012 after killing two of his children.

A memorial marks the spot of the Hyde Park bombing and the troop honours it daily with an eyes-left and salute with drawn swords. A plaque commemorating the victims of the second attack also stands in Regent’s Park.

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Victims

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20 July 1982
Anthony Daly   (23)

nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Ceremonial Cavalryman. Killed when remote controlled car bomb exploded while riding horse along South Carriage Drive, Hyde Park, London.

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20 July 1982
Simon Tipper   (19)

nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Ceremonial Cavalryman. Killed when remote controlled car bomb exploded while riding horse along South Carriage Drive, Hyde Park, London.

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20 July 1982
Jeffrey Young  (19)

nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Ceremonial Cavalryman. Killed when remote controlled car bomb exploded while riding horse along South Carriage Drive, Hyde Park, London.

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20 July 1982
Roy Bright  (36)

nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Ceremonial Cavalryman. Injured when remote controlled car bomb exploded while riding horse along South Carriage Drive, Hyde Park, London. He died on 23 July 1982.

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20 July 1982
Graham Barker  (36)

nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Bandsman. Killed when bomb exploded at bandstand, Regents Park, London.

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20 July 1982
Robert Livingstone  (31)

nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Bandsman. Killed when bomb exploded at bandstand, Regents Park, London.

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20 July 1982
John McKnight   (30)

nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Bandsman. Killed when bomb exploded at bandstand, Regents Park, London.

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20 July 1982
George Mesure   (19)

nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Bandsman. Killed when bomb exploded at bandstand, Regents Park, London.

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20 July 1982


Keith Powell   (24)

nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA), K

illed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Bandsman. Killed when bomb exploded at bandstand, Regents Park, London

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20 July 1982
Laurence Smith  (19)

nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Bandsman. Killed when bomb exploded at bandstand, Regents Park, London.

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20 July 1982
John Heritage  (29)

nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Bandsman. Injured when bomb exploded at bandstand, Regents Park, London. He died on 1 August 1982

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Criminal proceedings

In October 1987, 27-year-old Gilbert “Danny” McNamee, from County Armagh, was sentenced at the Old Bailey to 25 years in prison for his role in the Hyde Park bombing and others, despite his plea that he was not guilty. In December 1998, shortly after his release from Maze prison under the Good Friday Agreement, three Court of Appeal judges quashed his conviction, deeming it “unsafe” because of withheld fingerprint evidence that implicated other bomb-makers. They stated that though the conviction was unsafe it did not mean McNamee was necessarily innocent of the charge.

 

On 19 May 2013, 61-year-old John Anthony Downey, from County Donegal, was charged with murder in relation to the Hyde Park bomb and intending to cause an explosion likely to endanger life. He appeared by videolink from Belmarsh prison for a bail hearing at the Old Bailey on 24 May and did not apply for bail so was remanded in custody.

At a hearing on 1 August 2013, Downey was granted conditional bail and a trial was scheduled for January 2014.

On 24 January 2014, Downey appeared at the Old Bailey for the beginning of his trial; he entered a not guilty plea on the four murder charges and the charge of intending to cause an explosion.

On 25 February 2014, it was revealed that Downey’s trial had collapsed after the presiding judge had ruled, on 21 February, upon a letter sent by the Police Service of Northern Ireland to Downey in 2007, assuring him that he would not face criminal charges over the attack. Although the assurance was made in error and the police realised the mistake, it was never withdrawn, and the judge ruled that therefore the defendant had been misled and prosecuting him would be an abuse of executive power.

Downey is one of 187 IRA suspects who received secret on-the-run letters guaranteeing them unofficial immunity from prosecution