14th July – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

14th July

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Wednesday 14 July 1971

A British soldier was shot dead in Belfast.

Richard Barton

Friday 14 July 1972

Six people were shot and killed in separate incidents in Belfast.

Three were British Army soldiers, two were members of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) and one was a Protestant civilian.

Sunday 14 July 1974

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) carried out bomb attacks in Manchester and Birmingham.

Monday 14 July 1975

Merlyn Rees, then Secretary of Sate for Northern Ireland, outlined the governments response to the Irish Republican Army’s (IRA) truce.

There had been a reduction in the level of British Army patrols, and house searches had been scaled down. He also indicated that in the event of a permanent end to paramilitary violence, security would be returned to a ‘peace time level’.

Tuesday 14 July 1981

Matt Devlin joined the hunger strike to replace Martin Hurson. The Irish government asked the United States government to use its influence with Britain on the issue of the hunger strike.

Wednesday 14 July 1982

James Prior, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, announced that elections to the new Assembly at Stormont would be held on 20 October 1982.

Saturday 14 July 1984

Two Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR) soldiers were killed in an Irish Republican Army (IRA) landmine attack at Castlederg, County Tyrone.

Monday 14 July 1986

Around 50 Loyalists attacked Catholic homes in the village of Rasharkin, County Antrim.

Thursday 14 July 1994

The Combined Loyalist Military Command (CLMC) issued a statement saying that if the Irish Republican Army (IRA) ended its campaign then Loyalist paramilitaries would respond.

Friday 14 July 1995

John Hume, then leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), and Gerry Adams, then President of Sinn Féin (SF), travelled to Dublin for a meeting with John Bruton, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), and Dick Spring, then Tánaiste (deputy Irish Prime Minister and Minister for Foreign Affairs).

Following the meeting the four men issued a joint statement calling for all-party talks as soon as possible. An article by Adams was published in the Irish Times (a Dublin based newspaper).

He wrote that the Irish Republican Army (IRA) would not have called a ceasefire if the decommissioning of paramilitary weapons had been a major issue for the British government.

Sunday 14 July 1996

Nationalists held large rallies in Belfast, Derry and Lurgan.

Monday 14 July 1997

The Royal Black Preceptory decided to voluntarily rerouted a parade that had been planned to pass through the centre of Newry, County Down.

An article in the Irish Times revealed that the British government had maintained regular contacts with the Republican movement since late June. Unionists called for the imposition of stringent rules on the decommissioning of arms as a precondition for the entry of Sinn Féin (SF) into all-party talks.

Tuesday 14 July 1998

The funeral took place of the three Quinn children in Rasharkin, County Antrim. There was a huge turnout for the funeral.

The three boys were buried in a single grave. David Trimble, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), criticised those people who were claiming that the attack was not sectarian. There was also Nationalist anger at remarks made by Ian Paisley, then leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), that “Republicans carried out far worse murders”.

David Jones, then a spokesman for the Portadown Orange Order, accused the security forces and Loyalist paramilitaries of colluding to launch the petrol bomb attack on the Quinn home on 12 July. He claimed the aim of the security forces would have been to discredit the Orange Order. Three Orange Halls and a Protestant church were damaged in petrol bomb attacks.

Wednesday 14 July 1999

Following a meeting of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) Executive David Trimble, then leader of the UUP, indicated that he would not participate in the d’Hondt procedure to appoint ministers to the North’s proposed power-sharing Executive.

[The decision to reject the ‘Way Forward’ proposals created another crisis in the peace process. Some commentators said that the move challenged the authority and prestige of Tony Blair, then British Prime Minister.]

Gerry Adams, then President of Sinn Féin (SF) published an article in the Irish News (a Belfast based newspaper) stating that his party was against the safeguard legislation introduced on 12 July and that it is unnecessary under the terms of the Good Friday Agreement.

Security force personnel dismantled barriers between Drumcree Church and the Garvaghy Road in Portadown. The barriers had been erected earlier in the month to prevent the Orange Order from marching through the mainly Nationalist area of Garvaghy Road.

Saturday 14 July 2001

Political talks to try to secure the peace process finally broke down at Weston Park in England. The British and Irish governments said they would now put together a document containing a package of proposals for the parties, on a take-it-or-leave-it basis.

[The document was finally presented to the parties, and made public, on 1 August 2001.]

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

10 People lost their lives on the 14th  July between 1969 – 1984

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14 July 1969
Francis McCloskey   (67)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC)
Died one day after being hit on head with batons during street disturbances, Dungiven, County Derry.

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14 July 1971


Richard Barton   (24)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while on British Army (BA) mobile patrol, Shaw’s Road, Andersonstown, Belfast.

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14 July 1972


Louis Scullion   (27)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot while walking through Unity Flats, off Upper Library Street, Belfast

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14 July 1972


Robert Williams-Wynn  (24)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper during gun battle, Lenadoon, Belfast.

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14 July 1972
Peter Heppenstall   (20)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while on British Army (BA) foot patrol, Alliance Avenue, Ardoyne, Belfast

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14 July 1972
Jane McIntyre   (64)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot outside her home, Highpark Drive, during Irish Republican Army (IRA) sniper attack on the nearby Black Mountain School British Army (BA) base, Highfield, Belfast.

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14 July 1972
Edward Brady   (30)

Catholic
Status: Official Irish Republican Army (OIRA),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot during gun battle, Ardilea Street, Ardoyne, Belfast.

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14 July 1972
John Williams  (22)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot during gun battle, Alliance Avenue, Ardoyne, Belfast.

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14 July 1984


Norman McKinley  (32)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in land mine attack on Ulster Defence Regiment foot patrol, Second Corgary, near Castlederg, County Tyrone.

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14 July 1984


Heather Kerrigan   (20)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in land mine attack on Ulster Defence Regiment foot patrol, Second Corgary, near Castlederg, County Tyrone

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