2nd May – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

2nd May

————————————-

Monday 5 May 1969

 August 1969; Civil Rights marches

Sunday 2 May 1976

Seamus Ludlow (47), a Catholic civilian, who was an unmarried forestry worker from Thistle Cross, Dundalk, County Louth, was killed in the early hours of the morning.

He was shot a number of times.

[Initially the Irish Republican Army (IRA) was suspected by some members of the Garda Siochana (the Irish police). Later members of Ludlow’s family came to the conclusion that the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) / Red Hand Commando (RHC) were responsible. The family have pressed the Iriish government for an Inquiry. On 3 November 2005 an interim report (PDF; 1650KB) into the killing was published.]

Thursday 2 May 1974

The Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) exploded a bomb at the Rose and Crown public house on the Ormeau Road, Belfast, killing six Catholic civilians and injuring a further 18. A woman member of the Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR) was shot dead by the Irish Republican Army (IRA) during a gun and rocket attack on the UDR base in Clogher, County Tyrone. The Irish government brought a case of torture against the British government to the European Commission on Human Rights. The case related to the treatment of Internees held in Northern Ireland

Monday 2 May 1977

In a last minute attempt to avoid the planned United Unionist Action Council (UUAC) strike Roy Mason, then Secretary of State, met leaders of the UUAC including Ian Paisley and Ernest Baird but the talks broke up without any agreement.

Ian Paisley rejected allegations that the UUAC was using the strike as cover to secure independence for Ulster but warned that if it did take place he could not guarantee that intimidation would not take place.

At Belfast docks workers decided by a small majority not to support the UUAC strike.

In areas of Belfast, including the Shankill and Crumlin Road, there were reports of a number of food vans being hijacked and their contents stolen.

In an interview Fred Mulley, then British Defence Secretary, warned that it might be impossible for the Army to maintain essential services.

Thomas Passmore, then County Grand Master of the Orange Order in Belfast, alleged that he had received death threats in the wake of his public opposition to the strike.

See: The Orange Order – What’s it all about?

An opinion poll carried out by the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) highlighted that although some 78 per cent of people interviewed opposed the UUAC stoppage, 93 per cent of Protestants and 43 per cent of Catholics supported a tougher security response against the IRA.

The RUC announce that it had set up a special anti-intimidation squad in order to try to counter the use of the tactic during the proposed strike.

Just before midnight, in a reverse of an earlier decision, 400 workers walked out of the Belfast shipyard.

Wednesday 2 May 1984

Report of New Ireland Forum

The Report of the New Ireland Forum was published. The authors of the report criticised Britain’s policy of ‘crisis management’ since 1968. The report set out three possible options for the future of Northern Ireland: join with the Republic in a United Ireland; joint authority over the region by the Republic of Ireland and Britain; a federal or confederal arrangement.

Charles Haughey, then leader of Fianna Fáil (FF), said that unity was the only option. The report rejects the use of violence to achieve political change in Northern Ireland.

Friday 2 May 1986

John Hermon, then Chief Constable of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC), stated that fifty RUC families and 79 Catholic families had their homes fire-bombed by Loyalists between 1 and 26 April 1986.

Hermon condemned the attacks and accused some Unionist politicians of “consorting with paramilitary elements”.

Saturday 2 May 1992

The Garda Síochána (the Irish police) uncovered a large cache of arms, including 51 automatic rifles, in a concealed bunker at a farm near Newmarket, County Cork.

Thursday 2 May 1996

Conor Cruise O’Brien, formally an Irish Labour Party Minister, announced that he would stand in the forth-coming Northern Ireland elections on behalf of the United Kingdom Unionists (UKU).

Saturday 2 May 1998

Loyalist paramilitaries carried out a ‘punishment’ shooting attack on a 34 year old man in Forthriver Road in north Belfast.

[It was claimed that ‘mainstream Loyalists’, who were supposed to be observing a ceasefire, were responsible for the shooting.]

There were reports in local newspapers that a security force listening device had been planted in a house used by Gerry Kelly, then a senior Sinn Féin (SF) member.

Sunday 2 May 19997

A 16 year-old Catholic boy was attacked and badly beaten by a group of approximately 20 Loyalists in north Belfast. His arm was broken and he was left unconscious. The assailants also attacked the boy’s girlfriend

 ———————————————

Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

 12  People lost their lives on the 2nd May    between 1973 – 1987

———————————————–

02 May 1973


Liam McDonald   (18)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Defence Association (UDA)
Found shot in disused quarry, Ballyduff Road, Carnmoney, Newtownabbey, County Antrim

———————————————–

02 May 1974


Eva Martin   (28)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot during gun and rocket attack on Clogher Ulster Defence Regiment base, County Tyrone.

———————————————–

02 May 1974


Thomas Morrissey   (46)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Killed in bomb attack on Rose and Crown Bar, Ormeau Road, Belfast.

———————————————–

02 May 1974


John Gallagher  (23)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Killed in bomb attack on Rose and Crown Bar, Ormeau Road, Belfast.

———————————————–

02 May 1974


Thomas Ferguson   (62)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Killed in bomb attack on Rose and Crown Bar, Ormeau Road, Belfast.

———————————————–

02 May 1974


James Doherty  (53)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Killed in bomb attack on Rose and Crown Bar, Ormeau Road, Belfast.

———————————————–

02 May 1974

William Kelly  (56)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Killed in bomb attack on Rose and Crown Bar, Ormeau Road, Belfast.

———————————————–

02 May 1974
Francis Brennan  (56)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Injured in bomb attack on Rose and Crown Bar, Ormeau Road, Belfast. He died 11th May 1974.

———————————————–

. 02 May 1975


Alexandra Millar   (55)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Association (UDA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot at his workplace, Ardoyne Bus Depot, Ardoyne Road, Belfast.

———————————————–

02 May 1976


Seamus Ludlow   (49)

nfNIRI
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Red Hand Commando (RHC)
Found shot in laneway near to his home, Thistlecross, near Dundalk, County Louth

———————————————–

02 May 1980


Herbert Westmacott  (28)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Undercover British Army (BA) member. Shot during gun battle at house, Antrim Road, Belfast.

———————————————–

02 May 1987


Finbarr McKenna   (33)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in premature bomb explosion during attack on Springfield Road Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) base, Belfast.

———————————————–

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s