29th April – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

29th April

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Thursday 29 April 1976

An off-duty member of the Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR) and a Protestant civilian died as a result of an Irish Republican Army (IRA) attack near Dungannon, County Tyrone.

Friday 29 April 1977

Ian Paisley, then leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), warned in a statement that if the British authorities failed to alter its policies then loyalists might have to consider taking over the administration of Northern Ireland. He also called for people to consider a rent, rates and Value Added Tax (VAT) strike.

A meeting was held in Harland and Wolff shipyard at which a large majority of workers voted not to support the planned UUAC strike.

In addition workers at the Ballylumford power station made it clear that they would only support the stoppage if it obtained clear support across all sectors of Northern Ireland industry.

Following a request by Roy Mason, then Secretary of State, it was announced that extra British soldiers would be sent to Northern Ireland to maintain law and order in anticipation of the UUAC strike taking place.

[1,200 soldiers arrived on 1 May 1977.]

It was reported that approximately 200 Ulster Defence Association (UDA) men from Scotland along with 50 more from Liverpool had arrived in Belfast to support the strike planned by the UUAC.

Monday 29 April 1991

CLMC Ceasefire

The ceasefire announced on 17 April 1991 by the Combined Loyalist Military Command (CLMC) began at midnight.

 The ceasefire was ended by the CLMC on 4 July 1991

Wednesday 29 April 1992

Political Talks Recommenced The political talks (later known as the Brooke / Mayhew talks) recommenced at Stormont with the four main political parties making opening statements.

Saturday 29 April 1995

The Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) closed an illegal drinking den in the Shankill Road area of Belfast. Following the closure four vehicles were set on fire.

Monday 29 April 1996

Dick Spring, then Tánaiste (deputy Irish Prime Minister and Minister for Foreign Affairs), made a proposal that the issue of decommissioning should become a ‘fourth strand’ in the proposed all-party talks.

Tuesday 29 April 1997

Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) and Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF) prisoners caused a riot and staged a protest on top of the roofs of blocks H1 and H2 in the Maze Prison.

There were protesting at the tighter security rules that were approved on 28 April 1997. The Loyalist prisoners said that the new rules should only apply to Republican prisoners.

John Major, then British Prime Minister, in an article in the Irish Times said that “some decommissioning would have to take place during talks” but he indicated that Sinn Féin (SF) could enter the talks when there was an Irish Republican Army (IRA) ceasefire.

Wednesday 29 April 1998

Further allegations were made that there had been collusion between the security forces and Loyalists in the killing of Pat Finucane on 12 February 1989. Sir Kenneth Bloomfield, then Northern Ireland Victims Commissioner, published his report, We Will Remember Them, on the victims of the conflict in Northern Ireland.

See Pat Finucane

The European Parliament welcomed a joint presentation on Northern Ireland from Marjorie (Mo) Mowlam, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, and David Andrews, then Irish Foreign Minister.

4The MEPs then listened in silence as Ian Paisley, then leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), declared that: “Ulster people will not be bullied and will not be bribed”.

Thursday 29 April 1999

A survey on behalf of the Parades Commission showed that of those questioned 82 per cent wanted the Orange Order to engage in talks with the Commission about the issue of contentious parades.

Saturday 29 April 2000

Patrick Neville (31), a civilian from the Republic of Ireland, was found shot dead on a stairway in a block of flats near to his home in Inchicore, Dublin. It was believed that the Irish National Liberation Army (INLA) was responsible for his killing.

[His death was linked to the killing of Patrick Campbell on 10 October 1999.]

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

 11  People lost their lives on the 29th  April   between 1972– 2000

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29 April 1972

Rosaleen Gavin,   (8)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot during sniper attack on British Army (BA) base, Oldpark Road, Belfast.

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29 April 1973


Graham Cox,  (19)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while on British Army (BA) mobile patrol, New Lodge Road, Belfast.

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29 April 1976
 Edmund Stewart   (31)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Shot while visiting a friend’s farm, Dunamony, near Dungannon, County Tyrone

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29 April 1976
Stanley Arthurs   (43)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot, together with off duty Ulster Defence Regiment member, at his farm, Dunamony, near Dungannon, County Tyrone. He died 3 May 1976

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29 April 1977
Eric Shiells   (49)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Shot outside his home, Northland Row, Dungannon, County Tyrone.

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29 April 1979
Samuel Gibson   (52)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Shot by sniper while driving to work, Edendork, near Coalisland, County Tyrone

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29 April 1980
George Kerr   (44)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Shot at his home, Chadolly Street, off Newtownards Road, Belfast.

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29 April 1984


Thomas McGeary   (48)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Republican group (REP)
Killed by booby trap bomb attached to his car, while driving along Old Moy Road, Drumarn, near Armagh.

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29 April 1992


Conor Maguire   (22)

Catholic
Status: Irish People’s Liberation Organisation (IPLO),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot at his workplace, Ligoniel Improvements Association, Conneywarren Lane, Ligoniel, Belfast.

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29 April 1994
 Michael Brown   (23)

nfNI
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
From County Leitrim. Found shot, by the side of Omeath Road, near Newry, County Down. Alleged informer

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29 April 2000
Patrick Neville   (31)

nfNIRI
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish National Liberation Army (INLA)
Found shot on stairway in block of flats, near to his home, St. Michael’s estate, Inchicore, Dublin. (His death was linked to the killing of Patrick Campbell on 10 October 1999.)

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