2nd October – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles
2nd t October

Friday 2 October 1970

It was announced that local government elections would be postponed.

[The next local government elections took place on 30 May 1973.]

Saturday 2 October 1971

A member of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) was killed in a premature bomb explosion.

Thursday 2 October 1975

UVF Logo
UVF Logo

12 People Killed in UVF Attacks 12 people died in a series of Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) attacks across Northern Ireland. Four Catholic civilians were killed in a UVF gun attack at Casey’s Bottling Plant, Millfield, Belfast. Two other Catholic civilians were killed in separate bomb attacks in Belfast and County Antrim.

Two Protestant civilians were also killed in UVF attacks. And four members of the UVF died when a bomb they were transporting exploded prematurely near Coleraine, County Derry.

Tuesday 2 October 1979

In a statement the Irish Republican Army (IRA) rejected Pope John Paul II’s call for an end to the violence in Northern Ireland. The IRA declared that it had widespread support and that Britain would only withdraw from Northern Ireland if forced to do so: “force is by far the only means of removing the evil of the British presence in Ireland … we know also that upon victory the Church would have no difficulty in recognising us”. Maurice Oldfield, the former head of MI6, was appointed to a new post of security co-ordinator for Northern Ireland.

[This is seen as an attempt to improve relations between the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) and the British Army.]

Thursday 2 October 1986

George Seawright, then a Loyalist councillor, was sentenced to nine months imprisonment for his part in disturbances following a protest at Belfast City Hall on 20 November 1985.

Wednesday 2 October 1991

‘The Committee’ Broadcast The Channel 4 broadcasting company showed a documentary called ‘The Committee’ in its Dispatches series. The programme claimed that there was an ‘inner circle’ in the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) and Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR) which was colluding with Loyalist paramilitaries in the killing of Catholics.

[A subsequent book on the controversy, also entitled ‘The Committee’, was not released in the United Kingdom (UK) by the American publishers who feared libel proceedings.]

Saturday 2 October 1993

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) exploded three bombs in Hampstead, north London and injured six people and damaged a number of shops and flats.

Monday 2 October 1995

The Irish Times (a Dublin based newspaper) carried a report of an interview with David Trimble, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP). Trimble was reported as calling for the establishment of a Northern Ireland Assembly and he said he would debate with Sinn Féin (SF) if the party took its seats in this proposed assembly. Trimble travelled to Dublin for a meeting with John Bruton, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister).

Friday 2 October 1998

Desmond Tutu

During a visit to Northern Ireland Archbishop Desmond Tutu of South Africa said that politicians would have to answer to the people if the peace process was allowed to stall.

Saturday 2 October 1999

David Trimble, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), spoke at the conference of the youth wing of the UUP. Trimble criticised the Young Unionists for passing a motion calling for the exclusion of Sinn Féin (SF) from any future government. As he spoke Trimble was heckled. Gerry Adams, then President of Sinn Féin (SF), gave an address to the second annual Congress of Ógra Sinn Féin in Dublin.

The youth wing of SF voted to reject the Patten report. Eddie McGrady, then chief whip of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), accused the Conservative Party of selecting spokesmen on Northern Ireland who “are totally anti-Agreement, anti-change and therefore anti-peace”. Sam Cushnahan, then Director of Families Against Intimidation and Terror (FAIT), announced that the group was ending its work.

Monday 2 October 2000

The Human Rights Act 1998 came into force. This Act gave effect to some (but not all) of the provisions of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). The necessary legislation had been passed at Westminster in 1998 but the delay was to give lawyers and public organisations time to prepare. Under the Human Rights Act people are able to bring a case in local courts rather than having to go to Strasbourg where the European Court sits

Tuesday 2 October 2001

Quentin Davies, then Conservative MP and Shadow Secretary of State, accompanied parents and children as they returned home through the Loyalist protest outside the Holy Cross Girls’ Primary School in Ardoyne, north Belfast. Davies described the protest as “utterly unacceptable”.

[It was reported (Irish Times) that one protester, who seemed uncertain of Davies identity, shouted: “Away back to the Free State, Fenian scum”.]

The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) managed to secure 30 signatures to allow it to table a motion in the Northern Ireland Assembly to exclude Sinn Féin (SF) ministers from the Executive. The UUP motion had been short by two signatures but the Progressive Unionist Party (PUP) members put their names to the motion. The UUP has said that if the motion fails the party will withdraw its ministers from the Executive.

[The Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) had tabled a similar motion on Monday 1 October 2001 but the UUP motion will be the one debated. The planned move by the UUP will result in the (long-term) suspension of the power-sharing government.]

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following  people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die.”
Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live  forever

– To  the Paramilitaries  –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

  17  People lost their lives on the 2nd October  between 1971 – 1975

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02 October 1971
Terence McDermott,   (19)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died in premature bomb explosion outside electricity sub-station, Lambeg, near Lisburn, County Antrim.

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02 October 1972


Edward Stuart,  (20)

Protestant
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
From Northern Ireland. Undercover British Army (BA) member. Shot while driving laundry van, Juniper Park, Twinbrook, Belfast.

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02 October 1972
Edward Bonner,  (50)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot while inside Grosvenor Homing Pigeon’s Club, Iveagh Street, Falls, Belfast. Alleged informer.

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02 October 1972


Seamus Wright,  (25)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Abducted from his home, Bombay Street, Falls, Belfast. Presumed killed. Body never recovered. Alleged informer.

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02 October 1972


Kevin McKee,  (-9)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Abducted somewhere in Belfast. Presumed killed. Body never recovered. Alleged informer

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02 October 1975
Maria McGrattan,   (47)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot at her workplace, Casey’s Bottling Company, Millfield, Belfast.

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02 October 1975
Frances Donnelly,  (35)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot at her workplace, Casey’s Bottling Company, Millfield, Belfast.

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02 October 1975


Gerard Grogan,  (18)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot at his workplace, Casey’s Bottling Company, Millfield, Belfast.

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02 October 1975


Thomas Osbourne.  (18)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot at his workplace, Casey’s Bottling Company, Millfield, Belfast. He died 23 October 1975.

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02 October 1975


Thomas Murphy,   (29)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Killed in booby trap bomb attack at his photographer’s shop, corner of Cranburn Street and Antrim Road, Belfast.

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02 October 1975


John Stewart,  (35)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Killed during gun and bomb attack on McKenna’s Bar, Ballyginiff, near Crumlin, County Antrim.

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02 October 1975
Irene Nicholson,  (37)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Killed in bomb attack on Anchor Bar, Catherine Street, Killyleagh, County Down.

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02 October 1975
Ronald Winters,   (26)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: not known (nk)
Shot at his parents’ home, London Road, Belfast.

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02 October 1975
Samuel Swanson,   (28)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Died when bomb exploded prematurely, while travelling in car along Farrenlester Road, near Coleraine, County Derry.

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02 October 1975
Mark Dodd,  (17)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Died when bomb exploded prematurely, while travelling in car along Farrenlester Road, near Coleraine, County Derry.

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02 October 1975
Robert Freeman,   (17)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Died when bomb exploded prematurely, while travelling in car along Farrenlester Road, near Coleraine, County Derry.

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02 October 1975


Aubrey Reid,  (25)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Died when bomb exploded prematurely, while travelling in car along Farrenlester Road, near Coleraine, County Derry.

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