Monthly Archives: May 2016

1st June – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

1st June

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Thursday 1 June 1978

David Cook, then a member of the Alliance Party (APNI), became the first non-Unionist Lord Mayor of Belfast. Cook secured this post because of a dispute between Unionist councillors.

[It was not until 1997 that a Catholic became Lord Mayor of Belfast.]

Roy Mason, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, held talks with Irish ministers in Dublin.

Tuesday 1 June 1982

Robert Richardson, then a Lieutenant-General, succeeded Richard Lawson as General Officer Commanding (GOC) of the British Army in Northern Ireland.

Friday 1 June 1984

Reagan Visit to Ireland

Ronald Reagan, then President of the United States of America (USA), began a four-day visit to the Republic of Ireland.

Thursday 1 June 1989

Two men were sentenced to life imprisonment for the murder of two British Army corporals on 19 March 1988.

Alex Murphy  Killers

 

 

See Corporal Killings

[This was the first in a number of trials connected with the killings.]

Friday 1 June 1990

Two British soldiers were killed by the Irish Republican Army (IRA) in separate incidents in England and Germany.

Monday 1 June 1992

A Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) councillor was elected Mayor in Derry with the backing of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP).

[The SDLP had a policy of rotating the posts of Mayor and Deputy Mayor between Nationalist and Unionist candidates.]

Tuesday 1 June 1993

Reg Empey, then a Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) councillor, was elected as Lord Mayor of Belfast. Hugh Smyth, then a Progressive Unionist Party (PUP) councillor, was elected as Deputy Lord Mayor.

Wednesday 1 June 1994

Dick Spring, then Tánaiste (deputy Irish Prime Minister and Minister for Foreign Affairs), told the Daíl that the key to Sinn Féin (SF) joining political talks was a permanent cessation of violence.

He said there would also have to be verification of the handing over of weapons.

Thursday 1 June 1995

Alasdair McDonnell, then a Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) councillor, was elected Deputy Lord Mayor of Belfast. McDonnell was the first Nationalist councillor to hold this position.

[The first Nationalist councillor to be elected Lord Mayor was appointed on 2 June 1997.]

Sunday 1 June 1997

Gregory Taylor (41), an off-duty Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) Constable, died following a beating he received from a Loyalist mob. Taylor was beaten and kicked to death outside a pub in Ballymoney, County Antrim, by a group of Loyalist bandsmen.

Taylor had been attacked after a row over the RUC’s position on a Apprentice Boys of Derry parade in Dunloy, County Antrim.

[It was later disclosed that Taylor had used his mobile phone to try to summon help, prior to the attack, from the local police station but no car was available to come to his aid. Initially eight men were charged with his murder including the son of an RUC officer, but a number of these were released when the case came to trial.

Two men were sentenced to life imprisonment but were later released under the terms of the Good Friday Agreement. Two other men pleaded guilty to manslaughter and were sentenced to four years imprisonment.]

Monday 1 June 1998

Marjorie (Mo) Mowlam, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, delivered a speech on the results of the referendum. David Alderdice, then an Alliance Party of Northern Ireland (APNI) councillor in Belfast, was elected as Lord Mayor of Belfast.

In Derry the Nationalist controlled council elected a Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) Mayor and a Sinn Féin (SF) Deputy Mayor.

[For many years in Derry the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) had adopted the policy of rotating the position of Mayor between Nationalist and Unionist parties.]

Tuesday 1 June 1999

Marie Moor, then Sinn Féin (SF) councillor, was elected as deputy Lord Mayor of Belfast. This was the first SF member to attain this position.

Robert Stoker, then Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) councillor, was elected as Lord Mayor.

Bertie Ahern, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), appealed for further information on where the Irish Republican Army (IRA) had placed the bodies of the ‘disappeared’.

jeanmcconville2

Ahern hoped any information would be passed to the Garda Síochána (the Irish police) and members of the Independent Commission for the Location of Victims Remains (ICLVR). He was replying to Mr Quinn, then Labour Party leader, who referred to the “extraordinary agony” which the families were going through.

See The Disappeared

Thursday 1 June 2000

There was an explosion in the early hours of the morning at Hammersmith Bridge in London. The explosion caused some damage to the bridge but no injuries. It was believed that the bomb attack was carried out by dissident republicans.

 

——————————————

Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

5   People lost their lives on the 1st June  between 1975 – 1997

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01 June 1975
Margaret Kilfedder  (61)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in bomb attack on her home, Garrison, County Fermanagh. House previously owned by Ulster Defence Regiment member.

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01 June 1985
Roy McAlpine   (24)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot outside friend’s home, Annadale Flats, Ballynafeigh, Belfast. Internal Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) dispute.

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01 June 1990


Robert Davies  (19)

nfNIB
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Shot while sitting on bench at railway station, Lichfield, Staffordshire, England.

 ——————————————

01 June 1990
Michael Dillon-Lee (34)

nfNIE
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Shot outside his home, Dortmund, West Germany.

 ——————————————

01 June 1997


Gregory Taylor  (41)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Off duty. Beaten to death, outside Kelly’s Bar, Church Street, Ballymoney, County Antrim.

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31st May – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

31st May

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Saturday 31 August 1968

A delegation from the Northern Ireland Civil Rights Association (NICRA) met with members of the Derry Housing Action Committee (DHAC) to discuss the proposed march.

An ad-hoc Civil Rights Committee was established to organise the march on Saturday 5 October 1968.

[The Committee did not operate as anticipated and effective control of the march fell to Eamonn McCann and Eamon Melaugh.]

Thursday 31 May 1973

Loyalist paramilitaries carried out three bomb and gun attacks on Catholic owned public houses in Belfast, killing 2 men and injuring over 20 people.

In the first attack at 8.30pm a Loyalist gunman believed to be a member of the Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF), a covername for the Ulster Defence Association (UDA), opened fire on customers in Muldoon’s Bar with a Sterling sub-machine gun (SMG).

A bomb was also thrown into the bar. Thomas Curry (50), a civilain sea captain from Preston in England, was killed in the attack.

[It was latter revealed that the gun used in the attack had been stolen from a Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR) base on 23 October 1972 (Irish News; 3 May 2006).]

Later there was a bomb attack on McGlade’s Bar in Donegall Street in which Gerard Barnes (31), a Catholic civilian, was killed as he walked pass the bar. Members of the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) were believed to be responsible.

Friday 31 May 1974

Merlyn Rees, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, said that the Ulster Workers’ Council (UWC) strike had demonstrated a rise in ‘Ulster Nationalism’ which would have to be taken into account by the Westminster government.

Thursday 31 May 1984

The Lear Fan aircraft company in Belfast announced that almost all 350 jobs at the company would end.

[The company ceased trading in May 1985. The government had invested £45 million in the firm since 1980.]

Wednesday 31 May 1989

Hugh Annesley succeeded John Hermon as the Chief Constable of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC).

Friday 31 May 1991

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) carried out a bomb attack on a Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR) base at Glenanne, County Armagh, and killed three UDR soldiers. The bomb, estimated at 2,000 pounds, was placed in a lorry that was then rolled down a hill and into the perimeter fence.

Wednesday 31 May 1995

Prince Charles began a two day official visit to the Republic of Ireland. It was the first official visit by a member of the British royal family since Irish independence.

While the Prince attended a reception in Dublin Castle there was a protest outside against his visit by approximately 3,000 people.

Saturday 31 May 1997

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) was forced to abandon a bomb in the Poleglass area of Belfast.

John Bruton, the Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), called a halt to all further contacts between officials of the Irish government and Sinn Féin (SF).

Loyalist protesters staging a picket outside the Catholic church in Harryville, Ballymena, blocked the road to deny access to the chapel. One man was arrested by the police for disorderly conduct.

 

  ——————————————

Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

13  People lost their lives on the 31st May between 1973 – 1993

 ——————————————

31 May 1972
Michael Bruce   (27 ) nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while on British Army (BA) mobile patrol, Kennedy Way, Andersonstown, Belfast

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31 May 1973
Thomas Curry   (50)

nfNI
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
English seaman. Shot during bomb and gun attack on Muldoon’s Bar, Corporation Square, Belfast.

 ——————————————

31 May 1973


Gerard Barnes   (31)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Passerby, killed when bomb exploded outside McGlade’s Bar, Donegall Street, Belfast.

 ——————————————

31 May 1974
Alfred Shotter  (54)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by booby trap bomb hidden in dustbin at his former home, Strabane Old Road, Gobnascale, Derry

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31 May 1975


Eamon Molloy   (22)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Abducted somewhere in Belfast during May 1975. Remains found, on instructions from the IRA, placed in a coffin, left above ground, in Faughart Cemetary, near Dundalk, County Louth, on 28 May 1999. Alleged informer

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31 May 1976


Frederick McLoughlin   (48)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Died two weeks after being shot during gun attack on Eagle Bar, Charlemont, County Armagh. He was injured on 15 May 1976.

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31 May 1981


Colin Dunlop   (30)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot while guarding patient at Royal Victoria Hospital, Falls Road, Belfast.

 ——————————————

31 May 1981
Michael O’Neill  (34)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by booby trap bomb in abandoned car, Drumalane Road, Newry, County Down.

 ——————————————

31 May 1987


Patrick Cunningham  (27)

Catholic
Status: Irish National Liberation Army (INLA),

Killed by: Irish National Liberation Army (INLA)
Abducted somewhere in the County Armagh area during May 1987. Found shot, in outbuilding of unoccupied farm, Errybane, near Castleblayney, County Monaghan, on 8 December 1987.

Internal Irish National Liberation Army (INLA) dispute.

 ——————————————

31 May 1991
Paul Blakely   (30)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by bomb left in abandoned lorry outside Glenanne British Army (BA) base, near Mount Norris, County Armagh.

 ——————————————

31 May 1991


Robert Crozier (46)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by bomb left in abandoned lorry outside Glenanne British Army (BA) base, near Mount Norris, County Armagh.

 ——————————————

31 May 1991


Sydney Hamilton  (44)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by bomb left in abandoned lorry outside Glenanne British Army (BA) base, near Mount Norris, County Armagh.

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31 May 1993
Christopher Wren   (34)

Protestant
Status: Royal Irish Regiment (RIR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Killed by booby trap bomb attached to his car while travelling along Carrydarragh Road, Moneymore, County Derry.

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30th May – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

30th May

———————————

Wednesday 30 May 1973

District Council Elections

Local government elections were held in Northern Ireland based on the new 26 District Councils.

The elections were contested on a ‘proportional representation’ (PR) basis, using the single transferable vote (STV) system, for the first time in Northern Ireland since 1920. The turnout for the election was 68.1 per cent of the electorate.

There were a number of parties which were contesting elections in Northern Ireland for the first time, including: Alliance Party, Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), Republican Clubs, Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), and Vanguard.

The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) took 41.4 per cent of the vote, while the SDLP won almost all of the Nationalist / Catholic vote.

[See the page on election results for full details of the local government results.]

Thursday 30 May 1974

The Northern Ireland Assembly was prorogued for a period of four months.

[Public Records 1974 – Released 1 January 2005: Memo written by Harold Wilson, then British Prime Minister, in which he considers what might be done if there was a resumption of the strike.]

Monday 30 May 1977

A statement written by four members of the Church of Ireland, who were also graduates of Trinity College Dublin, appeared in the Irish Times and other newspapers.

The statement contained an apology for the deeds of the ‘Ascendancy Church’ in its dealing with the Catholics of Ireland.

Monday 30 May 1983

First Meeting of New Ireland Forum

The first meeting of the New Ireland Forum took place in Dublin Castle, Republic of Ireland.

Sinn Féin (SF) was excluded because the renunciation of violence was made an essential prerequisite to joining the Forum. The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), and the Alliance Party of Northern Ireland (APNI) all refused to attend.

The Forum consisted of eight members of Fine Gael (FG), nine members of Fianna Fáil (FF), five members of Irish Labour, and five members of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP).

[ PRONI Records – May 1983.]

 

Monday 30 May 1994

At a press conference in Belfast, Ian Paisley, then leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), described James Molyneaux, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), as:

“a Judas Iscariot”.

[On Wednesday 1 June 1994, Molyneaux said that the remark was “a shattering blow” to Unionist unity.]

Tuesday 30 May 1995

An Inquest opened in Craigavon, County Armagh, into the killing of 8 Irish Republican Army (IRA) members and one other person at Loughgall, County Armagh, on 8 May 1987.

See Loughgall Amush

Thursday 30 May 1996

Forum Elections

Elections to the proposed Northern Ireland Forum and all-party negotiations were held across Northern Ireland.

The most significant outcome was that Sinn Féin (SF) attracted a record vote of 15.5%. [RESULTS: Turnout – 64.7%, 754,296; Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) – 30 seats, 24.2%; Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) – 21 seats, 21.4%; Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) – 24 seats, 21.4%; Sinn Féin (SF) – 17 seats, 15.5%; Alliance Party of Northern Ireland (APNI) – 7 seats, 6.5%; United Kingdom Unionists (UKU) – 3 seats, 3.7%; Progressive Unionist Party (PUP) – 2 seats, 3.5%; Ulster Democratic Party (UDP) – 2 seats, 2.2%; Northern Ireland Women’s Coalition (NIWC) – 2 seats, 1.0%; Labour – 2 seats, 0.8%.]

Friday 30 May 1997

Representatives of all of Northern Ireland political parties flew to South Africa for a conference with those who had negotiated the peace settlement in that country.

The conference was organised by Padraig O’Malley. Unionists only agreed to take part after assurances that there would be separate facilities so as to avoid direct contact with the Sinn Féin (SF) representatives.

Ronnie Flanagan, then Chief Constable of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC), gave an interview to the BBC in which he said that major reform of the RUC would take place following an Irish Republican Army (IRA) ceasefire.

Saturday 30 May 1998

There were disturbances on the Garvaghy Road in Portadown following a ‘junior’ Orange Order parade in the area.

Nationalists from the Garvaghy Road threw petrol bombs at police lines, the police responded with plastic baton rounds. Several people were injured during the clashes.

[Rioting continued in the area on the following evening.]

The Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) voted to retain ‘Rule 21’ which bans members of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) and British Army from joining the GAA.

However, a motion was agreed which pledged the organisation to removing the rule when “effective steps are taken to implement the amended structures and policing arrangements envisaged in the British-Irish agreement.”

[The decision was strongly criticised by Unionist politicians in Northern Ireland.]

Tuesday 30 May 2000

Devolution Restored

The British government restored devolution to the Northern Ireland Assembly and the power-sharing Executive.

  ——————————————

Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

6 People lost their lives on the 30th May  between 1972 – 1993

 ——————————————

30 May 1972


Joan Scott   (12)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died three days after being shot during sniper attack on Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) mobile patrol, Oldpark Road, Belfast.

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30 May 1972
Marcel Doglay   (28)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed when time bomb exploded inside Springfield Road Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) / British Army (BA) base, Belfast.

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30 May 1976
John Ritchie  (31)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Milkman. Found shot in his milk float, Springhill Avenue, Ballymurphy, Belfast.

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30 May 1977


Malachy Gregory   (39)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot at his workplace, College Square North, Belfast. Off duty Ulster Defence Regiment member intended target.

 ——————————————

30 May 1993


Edward McHugh   (65)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Red Hand Commando (RHC)
Shot at his home, Canberra Park, Dundonald, Belfast.

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29th May – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

29th May

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Friday 29 May 1970

The Macrory Report, Review Body on Local Government in Northern Ireland (Cmd 546), dealing with local government structures was published.

The main recommendation is the abolition of the old structure of local government and its replacement with 26 new district councils.

The new system would also involve the creation of area boards to manage the health, education, and library services in Northern Ireland.

It was envisaged that the control of the new system would rest with the Northern Ireland government.

[Following the introduction of direct rule on 30 March 1972 much of the control of the main services passed effectively to Westminster. Elected councillors only had responsibility for a number of matters including refuse collection, public conveniences, crematoria and cemeteries (‘bins, bogs and burials’ as it was termed in Northern Ireland). The term ‘the Macrory Gap was coined to highlight the lack of local accountability on the part of those controlling the centralised services.]

Monday 29 May 1972

Official IRA Ceasefire

The Official Irish Republican Army (OIRA) announced that it was calling a ceasefire.

[Although the OIRA was involved in a number of incidents following the ceasefire it was to mark the end of the military wing of Official Sinn Féin (OSF).]

Wednesday 29 May 1974

A return to work began across Northern Ireland. The leaders of the Ulster Workers’ Council (UWC) officially called off the strike.

Troubled Images Exhibition, Belfast, August 2010 (03).JPG

see  Sunningdale  Ulster Workers’ Council Strike

Friday 29 May 1981

The names of four prisoners on hunger strike together with five other Republican prisoners, were put forward as candidates in the forthcoming general election in the Republic of Ireland.

 See 1981 Hunger Strike

Saturday 29 May 1982

President John F. Kennedy in motorcade in Cork on June 27, 1963

A United States of America (USA) Congress group called Friends of Ireland paid a fact-finding visit to Northern Ireland.

Thursday 29 May 1986

Tom King, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, informed the House of Commons of the decision to dissolve the Northern Ireland Assembly.

Tuesday 29 May 1990

The Northern Ireland Police Federation passed a vote of ‘no confidence’ in the Northern Ireland Office (NIO) and Peter Brooke, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland.

Thursday 29 May 1997

Bill Clinton, then President of the United States of America, paid a visit to London. During a meeting with Tony Blair, then British Prime Minister, Clinton gave his support to the Labour government’s approach to Northern Ireland. Clinton called for a renewed Irish Republican Army (IRA) ceasefire and for Sinn Féin (SF) to be then allowed to enter all-party talks.

Marjorie (Mo) Mowlam, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, and Dick Spring, the Tánaiste (deputy Irish Prime Minister and Minister for Foreign Affairs), held a meeting at Malahide near Dublin, Republic of Ireland.

Eight Loyalist prisoners asked the prison authorities to be moved to the Loyalist Volunteer Force (LVF) ‘wing’ of the Maze Prison.

Friday 29 May 1998

Details were released of the salaries that would be paid to members of the proposed Northern Ireland Assembly.

Saturday 29 May 1999

A ‘Junior’ Orange Order parade took place close to the mainly Catholic Garvaghy Road in Portadown, County Armagh.

There were disturbances following the parade with 13 Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) officers and four civilians injured.

RUC officers were reported to have fired 50 baton rounds (plastic bullets) during the disturbances.

The Independent Commission for the Location of Victims Remains (ICLVR) was informed that the body of Jean McConville, who had been abducted from her home in Belfast in 1972 by the Irish Republican Army (IRA), was buried under a car park at Templetown beach, five miles from Carlingford, County Louth.

[After several extensive excavations over a number of weeks nothing was found. McConville’s body was discovered by accident in 2004.]

See The Disappeared

There was further controversy at the Bloody Sunday Inquiry into the killings on 30 January 1972 when it became clear that George Robertson, then British Secretary for Defence, was supporting 17 members of the Parachute Regiment who were claiming anonymity on the grounds that they would be in danger if their names were revealed.

Edward_Daly_Bloody_Sunday

See Bloody Sunday

Monday 29 May 2000

Edmund McCoy (28), a Catholic civilian, died several hours after being shot while in the Motte ‘n’ Bailey Bar, Dunmurry, near Belfast.

[Republican paramilitaries were believed to have been responsible for the shooting but no group claimed responsibility.]

 ——————————————

Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

5 People lost their lives on the 29th May  between 1972 – 2000

 ——————————————

29 May 1972
Thomas Wardlow  (32)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot from passing car while walking along Millfield, Belfast.

 ——————————————

29 May 1977
Roland Hill   (74)

Protestant

Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Died one week after being shot during armed robbery at Ewart’s Bowling Club, Somerdale Park, Belfast.

 ——————————————

29 May 1979
George Surgeoner   (28)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Association (UDA),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Died three days after being shot while in Royal Bar, Shankill Road, Belfast

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29 May 1984
Stephen Anderson   (22)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA), Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in land mine attack on British Army (BA) foot patrol, Mounthill, near Crossmaglen, County Armagh.

 ——————————————

29 May 2000
Edmund McCoy  (28)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Republican group (REP)
Died several hours after being shot, while in Motte ‘n’ Bailey Bar, Kingsway, Dunmurry, near Belfast, County Antrim.

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28th May – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

28th May

——————————–

 

Wednesday 28 August 1968

Gerry Fitt, then an MP, tabled a House of Commons motion, which was signed by 60 Labour Party backbenchers, which criticised RUC action in Dungannon on 24 August 1968 and demanded that:

“citizens of Northern Ireland should be allowed the same rights of peaceful demonstration as those in other parts of the United Kingdom”.

 

Thursday 28 May 1970 Arms Trial Began

Charles Haughey and Neil Blaney, both former Irish government ministers, together with two other men James Kelly (Captain), then an Irish Army Intelligence Officer, and John Kelly, a Belfast Republican, were charged in a Dublin court with conspiracy to illegally import arms for use by the Irish Republican Army (IRA).

It was alleged that the arms were to be smuggled to the IRA in Northern Ireland. The men denied any involvement in the affair.

[This was the first day of the ‘Arms Trial’. Blaney was found not guilty on 2 July 1970, Haughey and the others were found not guilty on 23 October 1970.

Sunday 28 February 1971

A British soldier died in Derry as a result of inhaling chemicals from fire extinguisers that were used to put out a fire inside the vehicle he was travelling in. The vehicle had been attacked with petrol bombs.

Sunday 28 May 1972

Eight people were killed when an Irish Republican Army (IRA) bomb prematurely exploded outside a house in Anderson Street, Short Strand, Belfast. Four of those killed were members of the IRA.

Tuesday 28 May 1974

Executive Collapsed, Direct Rule Resumed

Day 14 of the UWC strike

The crisis came to a head. Brian Faulkner resigned as Chief Executive following a refusal by Merlyn Rees, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, to meet with representatives from the Ulster Workers’ Council (UWC).

Faulkner’s Unionist colleagues also resigned. This effectively marked the end of the Northern Ireland Executive.

A large demonstration of farmers in tractors blocked the entrance to the Stormont parliament buildings and also much of the Upper Newtownards Road. News of the collapse of the Northern Ireland Executive spread to the protestors. Celebrations took place in Protestant areas across the region.

[Public Records 1974 – Released 1 January 2005: Telegram from General Idi Amin Dada, then President of the Republic of Uganda, to Harold Wilson, then British Prime Minister. Amin offers to host a conference in Uganda where representives of the conflict in Northern Ireland could meet.]

Friday 28 May 1976

      

David Robinson & Paul Hamill

A Catholic and a Protestant civilian were killed in a bomb attack on the Club Bar, University Road, Belfast. The attack was carried out by Loyalist paramilitaries.

Thursday 28 May 1981

 

Charles Maguire and George McBrearty

Charles Maguire (20) and George McBrearty (24), both members of the IRA, were shot dead as they approached a car on the Lone Moor Road in Derry.

The car contained undercover members of the British Army.

Mervyn Robinson

A member of the RUC was shot dead by the IRA near Bessbrook, County Armagh.

Martin Hurson, an Irish Republican Army (IRA) prisoner in the Maze Prison, joined the hunger strike to replace Brendan McLaughlin who had been taken off the strike on 26 May 1981.

Margaret Thatcher, then British Prime Minister, paid a visit to Northern Ireland and made a statement indicating the British government’s belief that the hunger strike was the ‘last card’ of the IRA.

Monday 28 May 1990

Peter Brooke, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, met with Charles Haughey, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), and Gerry Collins, then Minister of Foreign Affairs.

Sunday 28 May 1995

There was serious rioting on the Shankill Road, west Belfast. During the disturbances 17 Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) officers were injured.

A shot was also fired at the RUC.

Tuesday 28 May 1996

Dick Spring, then Tánaiste (deputy Irish Prime Minister and Minister for Foreign Affairs), met Patrick Mayhew, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, in Dublin after which they announced that George Mitchell, a former United States Senator, should play a key role in the proposed all-party talks.

Wednesday 28 May 1997

The civil liberties group Human Rights Watch published a report that was highly critical of the actions of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) during the events surrounding Drumcree in July 1996.

The report claimed that the RUC had used excessive force, been indiscriminate in its use of plastic bullets, failed to remove illegal roadblocks manned by the Orange Order and Loyalists, and had abandoned its “traditional policing function in some areas”.

Marjorie (Mo) Mowlam, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, held a meeting with representatives of the Apprentice Boys of Derry (ABD), the Grand Orange Lodge, Ballynafeigh Orangemen, and the Ulster Civil Rights group.

The meeting was called to discuss the forthcoming ‘marching season’. John Bruton, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), briefed the relatives of those killed on ‘Bloody Sunday’ on a report being prepared by the Irish government on the killings on 30 January 1972. Bruton said that a “grave injustice” had been done to the families of the dead.

[The report contained new information on events of the day and was eventually presented to the British government.]

Thursday 28 May 1998

Martin McGuinness, then Vice-President of Sinn Féin (SF), held a meeting with Marjorie (Mo) Mowlam, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland.

Following the meeting McGuinness warned against “falling into the trap of trying to make decommissioning the most important item on the agenda”. A concert featuring Elton John was held in the grounds of Stormont.

Friday 28 May 1999

Body of One of the ‘Disappeared’ Recovered

The body of Eamon Molloy, one of the ‘disappeared’ who had been missing since 1975, was found above ground in a new coffin in a cemetery in County Louth, Republic of Ireland.

Garda Síochána (the Irish police) went to the site following information given by the Irish Republican Army (IRA) to the Independent Commission for the Location of Victims’ Remains (ICLVR). The IRA passed on information about the location of nine bodies at six sites in four counties in the Republic of Ireland.

The ICLVR was established jointly by Marjorie (Mo) Mowlam, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, and Mr O’Donoghue, then Minister for Justice in the Republic of Ireland.

The discovery marked the beginning of digging at a number of locations in Counties Louth, Monaghan, Meath, and Wicklow (all in the Republic of Ireland).

see The Disappeared

There was a pipe-bomb attack on the home of a Catholic family in Armagh. The device broke a window and caused minor damage to the house; the family escaped unharmed. The attacked was carried out by Loyalist paramilitaries.

 

 ——————————————

Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

16  People lost their lives on the 28th   between 1972 – 1986

 ——————————————

28 May 1972


James Teer   (21)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot from passing car while walking along Springfield Road, Belfast

 ——————————————

28 May 1972
Joseph Fitzsimmons  (17)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died in premature bomb explosion in house, Anderson Street, Short Strand, Belfast.

 ——————————————

28 May 1972
John McIlhone   (17)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died in premature bomb explosion in house, Anderson Street, Short Strand, Belfast.

 ——————————————

28 May 1972
Edward McDonnell   (29)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died in premature bomb explosion in house, Anderson Street, Short Strand, Belfast.

 ——————————————

28 May 1972
Martin Engelen  (19)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died in premature bomb explosion in house, Anderson Street, Short Strand, Belfast.

 ——————————————

28 May 1972
Henry Crawford  (39)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died in premature bomb explosion in house, Anderson Street, Short Strand, Belfast.

 ——————————————

28 May 1972
Mary Clarke   (27)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died in premature bomb explosion in house, Anderson Street, Short Strand, Belfast

 ——————————————

28 May 1972
John Nugent   (31)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died in premature bomb explosion in house, Anderson Street, Short Strand, Belfast.

 ——————————————

28 May 1972
Geraldine McMahon  (17)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died in premature bomb explosion in house, Anderson Street, Short Strand, Belfast.

 ——————————————

28 May 1976


David Robinson   (23)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Killed in bomb attack on Club Bar, University Road, Belfast.

 ——————————————

28 May 1976


Paul Hamill   (21)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Killed in bomb attack on Club Bar, University Road, Belfast

 ——————————————

28 May 1981


Mervyn Robinson  (47)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Shot outside Wayside Inn, Whitecross, near Bessbrook, County Armagh.

 ——————————————

28 May 1981


Charles Maguire   (20)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot by undercover British Army (BA) members, as he approached stationary car, Lone Moor Road, Creggan, Derry.

 ——————————————

28 May 1981


George McBrearty  (24)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot by undercover British Army (BA) members, as he approached stationary car, Lone Moor Road, Creggan, Derry.

 ——————————————

28 May 1985


Gary Smith   (19)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) applicant. Shot as he parked his car Millfield, Belfast.

 ——————————————

28 May 1986


Brian Brown  (37)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by remote controlled bomb hidden in garage, detonated when Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR) foot patrol approached, Newry Road, Kilkeel, County Down.

 ——————————————

27th May – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

27th May

————————-

Tuesday 27 August 1968

The Derry Housing Action Committee (DHAC) organised another protest in the Guildhall’s council chamber. Immediately after the protest Eamon Melaugh phoned the Northern Ireland Civil Rights Association (NICRA) and invited them to organise a march in Derry.

Monday 27 May 1974

Day 13 of the UWC strike

Gas supplies to Belfast and other outlying districts were affected by a drop in pressure and a warning was issued that consumers should switch off their supply at the mains.

The British Army took charge of 21 petrol stations throughout Northern Ireland. These petrol stations were to supply petrol to essential users who could obtain a permit from the Ministry of Commerce.

The Ulster Workers’ Council (UWC) retaliated following the take over of the petrol stations. The UWC announced that the British Army would have to undertake the supply of all essential services including basics such as bread and milk. There was a call issued for workers to stop their assistance in the provision of essential services.

The UWC also stated that the Ballylumford power station, County Antrim, would close at midnight.

[Public Records 1974 – Released 1 January 2005: Memo from Merlyn Rees, then Secretary of Sate for Northern Ireland, to Harold Wilson, then British Prime Minister. In the memo Rees sets out ‘The Short-term Possibilities’ for Northern Ireland and the Executive.] [ Sunningdale; Ulster Workers’ Council Strike. ]

Sunday 27 May 1990

In a gun attack in Roermond, Netherlands, the Irish Republican Army (IRA) shot and killed two Australian lawyers on holiday.

It was claimed that the men were mistaken for off-duty British Army soldiers. [It was believed that the killings led to a drop in support for the IRA in Australia.]

Thursday 27 May 1993

Queen Meets President Mary Robinson, then President of the Republic of Ireland, travelled to London to attend a meeting with Queen Elizabeth at Buckingham Palace.

[The meeting was the first official contact between an Irish president and a British monarch.]

Michael Ancram replaced Jeremy Hanley at the Northern Ireland Office (NIO) to become the Political Development Minister.

Wednesday 27 May 1998

In the aftermath of the Good Friday Agreement the issue of the ‘decommissioning’ of paramilitary weapons began to dominate the political agenda.

[Decommissioning was to prove a stumbling block to the full implementation of the Agreement and the issue was still causing problems in May 2000.]

Thursday 27 May 1999

Leaders of the Presbyterian Church criticised the Orange Order in Portadown, County Armagh, for failing to commend the Christian faith during the Drumcree parade dispute.

Legislation was passed at Westminster and the Oireachtas which guaranteed immunity from prosecution for anyone providing information on the location of the bodies of the ‘disappeared’.

Saturday 27 May 2000

UUC Support Trimble

There was a meeting of the Ulster Unionist Council (UUC), the policy-making body of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP).

David Trimble, then leader of the UUP, won a motion at the meeting which allowed him to re-enter the power-sharing Executive with Sinn Féin (SF).

The motion was on whether to accept the IRA offer on disarmament as a basis for the return to Stormont. Of the members present 459 voted in favour of a return to Stormont while 403 voted against.

[At a press conference following the UUC meeting it seemed that Trimble set out to offend Sinn Féin by remarking that the party had still to be politically “house-trained”.]

 

Sunday 27 May 2001

Stephen Manners (40), an ex-member of the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF), was shot dead while in Jimmy Mac’s Bar, North Street, Newtownards, County Down.

[It was believed that Loyalist paramilitaries carried out the killing although no organisations claimed responsibility.]

 ——————————————

Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

10 People lost their lives on the 27th  May between 1972 – 2001

 ——————————————

27 May 1972
Gerard Duddy  (20)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Shot while walking at the junction of Finaghy Road North and Andersonstown Road, Andersonstown, Belfast.

 ——————————————

27 May 1973


Margaret Hrykiewicz   (24)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Found stabbed to death on waste ground, Adela Street, off Antrim Road, Belfast

 ——————————————

27 May 1975
Patrick O’Reilly  (52)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot while driving along road at Scallen, near Irvinestown, County Fermanagh.

 ——————————————

27 May 1975
Gerard  McClenaghan  (36)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Died nearly three months after being injured during gun and bomb attack on Bush Bar, Leeson Street, Lower Falls, Belfast. He was wounded on 4 March 1975.

 ——————————————

27 May 1976


Gerard Masterson   (34)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Shot at his home, Allworthy Avenue, off Antrim Road, Belfast.

 ——————————————

27 May 1978


Collette Brady (26)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Defence Association (UDA)
Shot while walking along Cavehill Road, Belfast.

 ——————————————

27 May 1990
Stephen Melrose   (24)

nfNIE
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Australian national. Shot shortly after getting out of car, Town Square, Roermond, Netherlands. Assumed to be an off duty British Army (BA) member.

 ——————————————

27 May 1990
Nicholas Spanos  (28)

nfNIE
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Australian national. Shot shortly after getting out of car, Town Square, Roermond, Netherlands. Assumed to be an off duty British Army (BA) member.

 ——————————————

27 May 1991


Edward Spence   (26)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died two days after being shot while on Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) foot patrol, Lower Crescent, off University Road, Belfast

 ——————————————

27 May 2001
Stephen Manners   (40)

Protestant
Status: ex-Ulster Volunteer Force (xUVF),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Shot while in Jimmy Mac’s Bar, North Street, Newtownards, County Down.

——————————————

26th May – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

26th May

———————

Friday 26 May 1972

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) planted a bomb in Oxford Street, Belfast which killed a 64 year old woman.

At approximately 12.20 pm a 34-year-old man was shot and injured in the Silvio Street area of north Belfast.

[On 1 December 2015 the PSNI listed this shooting as one of nine incidents it was investigating in relation to the activities of the British Army’s Military Reaction Force (MRF).]

In the Republic of Ireland the Special Criminal Court was re-instituted to deal with crimes arising out of the Northern Ireland conflict. As part of the measures trial by jury was suspended.

Sunday 26 May 1974

Day 12 of the UWC strike

The leaders of the Ulster Workers’ Council (UWC) strike claimed that support was continuing to grow. The UWC also claimed that its system of permits was working well in maintaining ‘essential services’, particularly the supply of petrol.

The British Army arrested more than 30 men in raids on Protestant areas of Belfast. Gerry Fitt, then Deputy Chief Executive, attended a meeting at the Northern Ireland Office (NIO). The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) met at 1pm. A meeting of Brian Faulkner’s Unionist ministers also took place.

Tuesday 26 May 1981

Brendan McLaughlin, who had joined the hunger strike on 14 May 1981, was taken off the strike when he suffered a perforated ulcer and internal bleeding.

The Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) carried out a raid on the headquarters of the Ulster Defence Association (UDA) in Belfast and discovered a number of illegal weapons.

[At this time the UDA, although a Loyalist paramilitary group, was still a legal organisation and was not ‘proscribed’ until 10 August 1992.]

Sunday 26 May 1985

The Lear Fan aircraft company announced the closure of its Northern Ireland plant. Most of the 350 people that had been employed by the company had lost their jobs following the first announcement about the firm’s future on 31 May 1985.

26 May 1988

James Molyneaux, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) and Ian Paisley, then leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) met with Tom King, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, for what turned out to be the last in the series of ‘talks about talks’.

Sunday 26 May 1991

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) exploded a large bomb in a Protestant housing estate in Cookstown. Thirteen people were injured and over 100 houses were damaged by the explosion

Wednesday 26 May 1993

The European Court of Human Rights considered an appeal against the use, within the United Kingdom (UK), of a period of seven-day detention under the Prevention of Terrorism Act (PTA). The Court rejected the appeal on the grounds that the situation in Northern Ireland justified the detention of suspects for longer than four days.

Monday 26 May 1997

Gransha High School in Bangor, County Down was seriously damaged in an arson attack.

Dick Spring, then Tánaiste (deputy Irish Prime Minister and Minister for Foreign Affairs), held a meeting in Derry with John Hume, then leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP). Following the meeting Spring said that a vote for Sinn Féin (SF) was “a vote for peace”.

This contradicted his coalition partner John Bruton, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), who had previously said that a vote for SF was a vote for the Irish Republican Army (IRA).

Roisín McAliskey, then being held in prison awaiting a decision about extradition, gave birth to a baby girl (5lb 13oz) at Whittington Hospital in London.

Tuesday 26 May 1998

The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) took the decision not to allow the anti-agreement MP, Jeffrey Donaldson, to stand for election to the new Northern Ireland Assembly.

The Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) held a news conference in Belfast and said that the party would not set out to wreck the Assembly. At the conference Ian Paisley, then leader of the DUP, accused the Queen of being the “parrot” of Tony Blair, then British Prime Minister.

Wednesday 26 May 1999

The Dáil introduced legislation to extend the deadline for the removal of articles 2 and 3 from the Constitution of the Republic of Ireland. Catholic Bishops called for a task force to be set up in both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland to study the legal and social implications of a World Health Organisation (WHO) charter on alcohol. In their pastoral, The Temperate Way, the bishops pointed out that alcohol is the major dependency problem not just in Ireland but also in Europe.

Friday 26 May 2000

Martin Taylor (35), a member of the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF), was shot dead while working on wall outside a house in Ballysillan, Belfast.

The Loyalist Volunteer Force (LVF) was believed to be responsible for his killing. The killing was part of a feud between the LVF and the UVF.

 

  ——————————————

Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

5  People lost their lives on the 26th  May between 1972 – 2000

 ——————————————

26 May 1972
Margaret Young   (64)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in car bomb explosion, Oxford Street, Belfast.

 ——————————————

26 May 1973


Paul Crummey   (4)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot during sniper attack on British Army (BA) foot patrol, Finaghy Road North, Belfast.

 ——————————————

26 May 1983


Colin Carson   (31)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish National Liberation Army (INLA)
Shot outside Cookstown Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) base, County Tyrone

 ——————————————

26 May 1983


Trevor Close   (33)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Shot while delivering milk, Elimgrove Street, off Cliftonville Road, Belfast.

 ——————————————

26 May 2000
Martin Taylor   (35)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)

 Killed by: Loyalist Volunteer Force (LVF)
Shot while working on wall outside a house, Silverstream Park, Ballysillan, Belfast. Loyalist Volunteer Force (LVF) / Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) feud

 ——————————————

25th May – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

25th May

————————–

Tuesday 25 May 1971

Michael Willets

A British soldier was killed in an Irish Republican Army (IRA) bomb attack on the joint Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) / British Army (BA) base on the Springfield Road in Belfast.

Saturday 25 May 1974

Day 11 of the UWC strike

Alfred Stilges (52), a Catholic civilian, was beaten to death by Loyalist paramilitaries in Forthriver Road, Glencairn, Belfast.

Harold Wilson, then British Prime Minister, made a broadcast [text of speech] on British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) television and radio at 10.15pm.

[The speech proved to be totally counter-productive. At one point in the speech Wilson referred to ‘spongers’ – meaning the Ulster Workers’ Council (UWC) and its supporters.

However most Protestants took the reference as a slight on them. Indeed some Protestants took to wearing small sponges in their lapels the following day as a gesture of support for the strike.]

[Public Records 1974 – Released 1 January 2005: Fax sent on behalf of Harold Wilson to Liam Cosgrave, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister). The fax contained the text of a statement that Wilson was due to give on British television later that day.] [ Sunningdale; Ulster Workers’ Council Strike. ]

Tuesday 25 May 1976

The Ulster Service Corps, a Loyalist paramilitary grouping, announced that it was going to mount ‘patrols’ because of the ‘deteriorating security situation’.

Wednesday 25 May 1977

James Callaghan, then British Prime Minister, announced that an all-party Speaker’s Conference was to be established to consider the merits of the argument for more Northern Ireland Members of Parliament.

Thursday 25 May 1978

Brian McKinney

 

 

Brian McKinney and John McClory, both Catholic civilians, were abducted by the Irish Republican Army (IRA) and ‘dissapeared’.

John McClory
John McClory

Their bodies were recovered on 29 June 1999

See The Disappeared

 

Friday 25 May 1984 Security forces in Northern Ireland discovered large quantities of explosives in County Tyrone and County Down. In the United States of America (USA) both houses of Congress unanimously backed the Report of the New Ireland Forum.

Wednesday 25 May 1988

Government White Paper

A White Paper on fair employment was issued by the British government. Suggestions included the compulsory monitoring of the religious composition of workforces in companies in Northern Ireland. A new Fair Employment Commission (FEC) was proposed to replace the Fair Employment Agency (FEA).

[A Bill was brought forward on 15 December 1988.]

Saturday 25 May 1991

Eddie Fullerton, then a Sinn Féin (SF) councillor in Buncrana, County Donegal, Republic of Ireland, was shot dead by the Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF), a cover name (pseudonym) used by the Ulster Defence Association (UDA).

 

[This killing took place despite a Loyalist ceasefire announced by the Combined Loyalist Military Command (CLMC) that began at midnight on 29 April 1991. The UDA stated that the ceasefire did not apply to the Republic of Ireland.]

Terence O’Neill

A British soldier was killed in an Irish Republican Army (IRA) attack in Belfast.

Thursday 25 May 1995

Bill Clinton, then President of the United States of America (USA), addressed the investment conference in Washington, USA. He called for an end to paramilitary violence, ‘punishment’ beatings, and intimidation, in Northern Ireland. Clinton also announced a number of economic initiatives.

Saturday 25 May 1996

Dessie McCleery, then a member of the Irish National Liberation Army (INLA) ‘GHQ’ faction, was shot dead in central Belfast. The killing was part of a continuing INLA feud.

25 May 1998

Those responsible for the picket outside the Catholic church in Harryville, Ballymena, announced that they were calling a halt to the weekly Saturday evening protest.

The protest had begun in September 1996 and policing costs were estimated at £2 million.

The Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) named Billy Hutchinson, then a Progressive Unionist Party (PUP) councillor, as its contact with the arms decommissioning body.

According to British statistics more than 5,300 women with addresses in the Republic of Ireland had abortions in Britain during 1997. This is the highest figure on record; in 1987 the figure was 3,673.

 

  ——————————————

Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

11  People lost their lives on the 25th May between 1971 – 1996

 ——————————————

25 May 1971


Michael Willets   (27)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by time bomb left inside Springfield Road Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) / British Army (BA) base, Belfast.

 ——————————————

25 May 1973


Joseph Matthews   (30)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Defence Association (UDA)
Found shot at Giant’s Ring, near Shaw’s Bridge, Belfast.

 ——————————————

25 May 1974
Alfred Stilges   (52)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Found beaten to death in partially-built house, Forthriver Road, Glencairn, Belfast.

 ——————————————

25 May 1975
Albert Ballantine   (19)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Found shot at side of Lettercor Road, near Gortin, County Tyrone.

 ——————————————

25 May 1978


Brian McKinney   (22)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Abducted on his way to work, Andersonstown, Belfast. Remains eventually found, on general instructions from the IRA, buried in bogland, Colgagh, near Inniskeen, County Monaghan, on 29 June 1999.

 ——————————————

25 May 1978


John McClory   (18)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Abducted on his way to work, Andersonstown, Belfast. Remains eventually found, on general instructions from the IRA, buried in bogland, Colgagh, near Inniskeen, County Monaghan, on 29 June 1999.

 ——————————————

25 May 1981
Thomas Ritchie   (28)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while on Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR) mobile patrol, Gulladuff, near Maghera, County Derry.

 ——————————————

25 May 1986
Francis Hegarty  (45)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Found shot, Cavan Road, near Castlederg, County Tyrone. Alleged informer.

 ——————————————

25 May 1991


Eddie Fullerton   (56)

nfNIRI
Status: Civilian Political Activist (CivPA),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Sinn Fein (SF) Councillor. Shot at his home, Cockhill Cottages, Buncrana, County Donegal.

 ——————————————

25 May 1991


Terence O’Neill   (44)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by grenade, dropped into compound at British Army (BA) base, from adjoining derelict building, North Howard Street, Falls, Belfast.

——————————————

25 May 1996


Dessie McCleery   (37)

Catholic
Status: Irish National Liberation Army (INLA),

Killed by: Irish National Liberation Army (INLA)
Shot, while in pizza restaurant, Bankmore Street, off Dublin Road, Belfast. Internal Irish National Liberation Army (INLA) dispute.

——————————————

24th May – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

24th May

—————————–

Monday 24 May 1971

There was more violence in Belfast which was to continue sporadically throughout the summer.

Friday 24

May 1974 Day 10 of the UWC strike

Two brothers, Sean Byrne (54) and Brendan Byrne (45), both Catholic publicans, were shot dead at their public house The Wayside Halt, Tannaghmore, near Ballymena, County Antrim.

They had been shot by Loyalist paramilitaries.

Talks were held at Chequers, the country home of the British Prime Minister, involving: Harold Wilson, then British Prime Minister; Merlyn Rees, then Secretary of Sate for Northern Ireland, Brian Faulkner, then Chief Executive; Gerry Fitt, then Deputy Chief Executive; and Oliver Napier, then Legal Minister and Head of the Office of Law Reform.

A statement was issued after the talks which stated that there would be no negotiations with those who operated outside constitutional politics.

[Public Records 1974 – Released 1 January 2005: Note of the meeting held at Chequers, England.]

The British Government Cabinet held a special meeting later in the day.

[Although the Cabinet agreed to allow Rees to put troops into power stations if he wished there was little support for such a course of action on the part of senior ranks in the British Army in Northern Ireland.] [ Sunningdale; Ulster Workers’ Council Strike. ]

Monday 24 May 1982

It was announced that the DeLorean car factory would close with the loss of 1,500 jobs.

Thursday 24 May 1984

Stalker Inquiry Begins

John Stalker, then Deputy Chief Constable of the Greater Manchester Police, arrived in Belfast to begin an investigation into the alleged ‘shoot to kill’ policy of security forces in the region.

[The investigation was to concentrate on three main cases that occurred on 11 November 1982, 24 November 1982, and 12 December 1982. However, in May 1986 before Stalker was to being the final part of his investigation he was removed from his duties as Deputy Chief Constable and ordered to return to England. He was subsequently reinstated but not allowed to return to Northern Ireland.]

Wednesday 24 May 1989

The scheduled assessment of the working of the Anglo-Irish Agreement (AIA) was published in a review document. The review was conducted under Article 11 of the AIA which stated that an assessment of the operation of the Intergovernmental Conference should be undertaken to see “whether any changes in the scope and nature of its activities are desirable”.

Thursday 24 May 1990

There was further trouble at Crumlin Road Prison over the issue of segregation. Peter Brooke, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, met with John Hume, then leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), in London for talks.

Wednesday 24 May 1995

Mayhew Meeting With Adams

Patrick Mayhew, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, had an ‘informal’ private meeting with Gerry Adams, then President of Sinn Féin (SF), at an investment conference in Washington, USA. The meeting lasted about 35 minutes.

The conference was attended by 1,300 delegates. Michael Ancram, then Political Development Minister at the Northern Ireland Office (NIO), met a SF delegation at Stormont, Belfast.

The Northern Ireland Police Authority (NIPA) rejected the latest Annual Report from the Chief Constable. The Police Authority criticised the report as not meeting the required standards of public accountability.

Saturday 24 May 1997

A bomb was planted in Dundalk in the Republic of Ireland; the bomb was defused by Gardaí. The bomb was believed to have been planted by the Loyalist Volunteer Force (LVF).

Loyalists, who were continuing their picket of the Catholic church at Harryville in Ballymena, County Antrim, attacked Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) officers who were protecting those Catholics attending the mass.

Monday 24 May 1999

The News Letter (a Belfast based newspaper) denied claims by James Molyneaux, former leader of the UUP, that its editorial on 17 May 1999 had been drafted by Alistair Campbell, then offical spokesman for the Prime Minister.

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

6 People lost their lives on the 24th May between 1973 – 1982

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24 May 1973
John Wallace  (32)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by remote controlled bomb, detonated when British Army (BA) foot patrol were searching house, Cullaville, County Armagh.

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24 May 1973
Ian Donald  (35)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by remote controlled bomb, detonated when British Army (BA) foot patrol were searching house, Cullaville, County Armagh.

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24 May 1974
Sean Byrne  (54)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Shot together with his brother, at their licensed premises, The Wayside Halt, Tavnaghmore, near Ballymena, County Antrim.

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24 May 1974
Brendan Byrne   (45)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Shot together with his brother, at their licensed premises, The Wayside Halt, Tavnaghmore, near Ballymena, County Antrim.

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24 May 1975


Noel Davis   (22)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish National Liberation Army (INLA)
Killed by booby trap bomb in abandoned car, Ballinahone, near Maghera, County Derry.

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24 May 1982
Anthony Anderson   (22)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: not known (nk)
Killed, when run over by British Army (BA) Armoured Personnel Carrier during petrol bomb attack on the vehicle, Butcher Street, Derry.

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23rd May – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

23rd May

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Thursday 23 May 1974

Day 9 of the UWC strike

Across Northern Ireland security forces removed barricades only to find that they had been replaced soon after. Workers in Derry were prevented from going to the Maydown Industrial Estate.

Although many schools managed to operate during the strike it was reported that some GCE examinations were affected.

Gerry Fitt, then Deputy Chief Executive, called on the British Government to send troops to the power stations and the oil refineries. Northern Ireland question time at Westminster again dealt with the strike.

Merlyn Rees, then Secretary of Sate for Northern Ireland, informed Harold Wilson, then British Prime Minister, that British Troops would have to be used to implement the ‘fuel oil plan’ being prepared by John Hume, then Minister of Commerce.

Friday 23 May 1975

Two Catholic civilians were shot dead by the Protestant Action Force (PAF), which was a covername used by the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF), during an attack on a house in Mount Vernon, Belfast.

Monday 23 May 1977

Roy Mason, then Secretary of State, started a new round of talks with the leaders of the main political parties.

Saturday 23 May 1981

Joseph Lynch (33), a Catholic civilian, was killed during a street disturbance involving members of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) at the junction of Oldpark Road and Gracehill Street, Belfast.

Wednesday 23 May 1984

The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) announced that it was ending its boycott of the Northern Ireland Assembly.

Sunday 23 May 1993

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) exploded a bomb, estimated at 1,500 pounds, in Magherafelt, County Derry. There was another IRA bomb in Belfast.

Monday 23 May 1994

Nigel Smith (19), a Protestant civilian, was shot dead by the Irish Republican Army (IRA) at his place of work in the Anderson and McAuley building, Castle Street, Belfast.

The Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) carried out a bomb attack on the Sinn Féin (SF) office in Belfast City Hall. The explosion injured two workmen.

Friday 23 May 1997

John Hume, then leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), held a meeting with David Trimble, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), to discuss the difficulties posed by the forthcoming ‘marching season’, particularly the Drumcree march in Portadown, County Armagh.

Saturday 23 May 1998

Garda Síochána (the Irish police) arrested two men when they discovered bomb-making material in two cars near Dundalk.

Sunday 23 May 1999

Tony Blair, then British Prime Minister, said he intended to invite representatives of the Garvaghy Road Residents’ Coalition (GRRC) and members of the Orange Order to intensive proximity-style talks on 3, 4, and 5 June 1999 in an effort to resolve the Drumcree parade dispute.

The United States Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) concluded its involvement in the inquiry into the death of Rosemary Nelson, a Lurgan solicitor killed on 15 March 1999, but announced it would continue to be available to assist the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC).

The Sunday Times (a London based newspaper) reported that David Trimble, then Leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), was suing Amazon.com for distributing the book ‘The Committee’ by Sean McPhilemy

Wednesday 23 May 2001

Bill Clinton, former President of the USA, paid another visit to Northern Ireland beginning in Derry. He said:

“I came here to reaffirm my belief in the Good Friday Agreement because it is still the right path to the future for peace, reconciliation, and fairness,”

 

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

8  People lost their lives on the 23rd May between 1972 – 1994

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23 May 1972


John Moran   (17)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Died ten days after being injured by car bomb left outside Kelly’s Bar, Whiterock Road, Ballymurphy, Belfast.

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23 May 1972


Eustace Handley   (20)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot by sniper while on British Army (BA) foot patrol, Springhill Avenue, Ballymurphy, Belfast.

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23 May 1972
Andrew Brennan   (22)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Defence Association (UDA)
Shot outside his home, Sicily Park, Finaghy, Belfast.

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23 May 1975


John McErlaine   (29)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Protestant Action Force (PAF)
Shot together with his brother, shortly after being lured to a house by a work colleague, Mount Vernon Green, Mount Vernon, Belfast.

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23 May 1975


Thomas McErlaine  (19)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Protestant Action Force (PAF)
Shot together with his brother, shortly after being lured to a house by a work colleague, Mount Vernon Green, Mount Vernon, Belfast.

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23 May 1981
Joseph Lynch   (33)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: not known (nk)
Killed during street disturbance between local people and Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) patrol, junction of Oldpark Road and Gracehill Street, Belfast.

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23 May 1987


Dermot Hackett  (37)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot by sniper while driving bread van, Drumhonish, near Drumquin, County Tyrone

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23 May 1994
Nigel Smith   (19)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ), Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Security man. Shot at his workplace, Anderson and McAuley building, Castle Street, Belfast.

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