Monthly Archives: March 2016

28th March – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

28th March

Tuesday 28 March 1972

Two people were killed in a bomb attack on the RUC station in Limavady, County Derry.

On the second day of the Ulster Vanguard strike a rally was organised at Stormont, Belfast, attended by an estimated 100,000 people.

The last sitting of the Northern Ireland parliament at Stormont took place.

Wednesday 28 March 1973

A ship (the ‘Claudia’) was intercepted off the Waterford coast in the Republic of Ireland. It was found to contain 5 tonnes of weapons which were on route to the Irish Republican Army (IRA).

Wednesday 28 March 1979

Labour Government Lost Vote of Confidence

The Labour government is defeated in a vote of confidence by 311 to 310 votes. The votes of Northern Ireland Members of Parliament (MPs) were decisive in bringing down the government. Eight Unionists voted against the government, two Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) MPs voted with the government, and Gerry Fitt, then leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), and Frank Maguire, an independent Nationalist MP, both abstained.

[Fitt had decided to withdraw his support from the Labour government over its failure to act on all the recommendations of the Bennett Report. Maguire who had a policy of abstention from Westminster did in fact travel to the House of Commons on this occasion. He later commented, “you could say I came over to London to abstain in person”. The loss of the vote of confidence was to trigger a general election on 3 May 1979 which would return a Conservative government with Margaret Thatcher as Prime Minister.]

Saturday 28 March 1981

Ian Paisley, then leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), addressed a rally, estimated at 30,000 people, at Stormont to protest against the on-going talks between the British and Irish governments.

Thursday 28 March 1991

The Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) under the cover of ( Protestant Action Force (PAF) ) carried out a gun attack on a mobile shop in Craigavon, County Armagh, and killed three Catholic civilians.

 

          

Eileen Duffy & Katrina Rennie

Two of the people killed were teenage girls.

Sunday 28 March 1993

John Hume, then leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), suggested that the two governments might impose a blueprint for a political settlement in Northern Ireland backed by a referendum.

The Sunday Telegraph (a British newspaper) published details of a poll of the opinions of a sample of people living in England on the Northern Ireland issue. Of those questioned 56 per cent said that they no longer wanted the region to remain in the United Kingdom (UK).

Tuesday 28 March 1995

Sinn Féin (SF) travelled to Dublin for a meeting with John Bruton, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), and Dick Spring, then Tánaiste (deputy Irish Prime Minister and Minister for Foreign Affairs).

[The discussions were on the issue of the decommissioning of paramilitary weapons.]

Sunday 28 March 1999

In an article in The Observer (a London based newspaper) Tony Blair, then British Prime Minister, and Bertie Ahern, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), appealed for the implementation of the Good Friday Agreement.

John Taylor, then Deputy Leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), said that David Trimble, then leader of UUP, might have to resign as First Minister if the d’Hondt mechanism was triggered to allocate positions on the Executive. A young couple who had suffered severe burns in the Omagh bombing on 15 August 1998 were married in the town.

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

9  People lost their lives on the 28th March between 1972– 1991

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28 March 1972
Joseph Forsyth  (57)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in van bomb explosion outside Limavady Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) base, County Derry. Driving past at the time of the attack.

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28 March 1972
Robert McMichael, (27)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in van bomb explosion outside Limavady Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) base, County Derry. Driving past at the time of the attack.

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28 March 1974
James Macklin,  (28)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Died seven days after being shot by sniper while on British Army (BA) mobile patrol, Antrim Road, Belfast.

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28 March 1977
Hester McMullan,   (63)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot at her home, Crosskeys, near Toome, County Antrim. Her off-duty RUC son was the intended target.

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28 March 1982

Norman Duddy,  (45)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Shot shortly after leaving church, Patrick Street, off Strand Road, Derry.

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28 March 1990


George Starrett,   (58)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Shot at his home, Newry Road, Armagh.

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28 March 1991


Eileen Duffy,   (19)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Protestant Action Force (PAF)
Shot during gun attack on mobile shop, Drumbeg South, Craigavon, County Armagh

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28 March 1991


Katrina Rennie,   (16)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Protestant Action Force (PAF)
Shot during gun attack on mobile shop, Drumbeg South, Craigavon, County Armagh

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28 March 1991


Brian Frizzell,  (29)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Protestant Action Force (PAF)
Shot during gun attack on mobile shop, Drumbeg South, Craigavon,County Armagh.

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27th March – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

27th March

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Saturday 27 March 1971

The Alliance Party of Northern Ireland (APNI) held its first Annul Conference  in the Ulster Hall in Belfast. The APNI was launched on 21 April 1970.

Sunday 26 March 1972

William Whitelaw, was appointed as the first Secretary of State for Northern Ireland.

Tuesday 27 March 1973

The governing body of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) the Ulster Unionist Council held a meeting to decide its position with regard to the White Paper published by the government on 20th March 1973.

 The council voted by 381 to 231 votes to accept the White Paper. Nevertheless, there remain strong opposition to the proposals even among those who decided to support Brian Faulkner. [Following the vote a number of members of the UUP left to form a new political grouping on 30th March 1973

Thursday 27 March 1975

 Senior members of the Ulster Defence Association (UDA) began a three day ‘conference’ to consider political options for the future. The meeting was held in Hotel Frommer in Holland. A brief note of the discussions that took place was written by ‘independent observers’ (PDF; 439KB).

Monday 27 March 1989

(c) Durham University; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

The 300th anniversary of the ‘Siege of Derry’ was celebrated by the Apprentice Boys of Derry.

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See Siege of Derry

Thursday 27 March 1997

The Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) uncovered a Loyalist arms cache in Carrickfergus, County Antrim.

Loyalist paramilitaries carried out two separate ‘punishment’ shootings on two men in north Belfast.

Members of the Spirit of Drumcree (SOD) group disrupted a meeting of the County Antrim Orange Order Lodge. The meeting had been called to allow Robert McIlroy, then County Grand Master, to explain the compromise that had been reached between the Lodge and the residents of Dunloy. The compromise had been brokered by Mediation Network.

Robert Salters, then Grand Master, criticised Joel Patton, then leader of SOD, for “stirring things up”. Patton called on Salters to resign.

The Northern Ireland Prison Service announced changes to the regime at the Maze Prison. Some leisure facilities were withdrawn and more regular head counts were introduced.

One of the main witnesses in Germany against Roisín McAliskey, then being held in prison awaiting a decision about extradition, denied ever seeing her when shown a photograph of McAliskey on Kontraste Sender Freies Berlin, a German television programme.

Brian Pearson, a former Irish Republican Army (IRA) prisoner, was granted political asylum in the United States of America by a New York immigration court.

Friday 27 March 1998

Cyril Stewart, a former member of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) , was shot dead by Republican paramilitaries [believed to be the Irish National Liberation Army (INLA)] at Dobbin Street in the centre of Armagh.

He was shot dead after he left a local supermarket where he had been shopping with his wife. Stewart had left the RUC a few months prior to his shooting because of ill-health. Seamus Mallon, then Member of Parliament (MP) for Armagh and Newry, described the attack as an act of “absolute savagery”.

Saturday 27 March 1999

The Orange Order held a meeting in Belfast at which it was decided that the Order would hold a single Twelfth of July demonstration at Drumcree, County Armagh, if the dispute over the parade was not resolved.

The meeting was read a statement by Jonathan Powell, then the Prime Minister’s chief of staff, which indicated Tony Blair’s high esteem for the Order and his belief that it could play “and important and constructive part in the future of Northern Ireland

Monday 27 March 2000

Bloody Sunday Inquiry

Edward_Daly_Bloody_Sunday

The Saville Inquiry into the events of Bloody Sunday began public hearings at the Guildhall in Derry. The hearings began with a statement by Christoper Clarke (QC), then counsel to the Inquiry.

See Bloody Sunday

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

10  People lost their lives on the 27th  March between 1973– 1998

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27 March 1973


Patrick McCabe   (16)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army Youth Section (IRAF),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot by British Army (BA) sniper from Flax Street British Army (BA) base, while walking along Etna Drive, Ardoyne, Belfast.

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27 March 1973
Andrew Somerville,  (20)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in land mine attack on British Army (BA) mobile patrol, Ballymacilroy, near Ballygawley, County Tyrone.

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27 March 1979


Gerry Evans,  (24)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
From Northern Ireland. Abducted while walking along road, near Castleblayney, County Monaghan, Republic of Ireland. His remains eventually found by information supplied anonymously, buried in bogland, Carrickrobin, near Dundalk, County Louth, on 15 October 2010.

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27 March 1981
John Smith,  (25)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Shot while on his way to work, Cromac Street, Markets, Belfast.

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27 March 1981


Paul Blake,  (26)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Defence Association (UDA)
Shot from passing car while walking along Berwick Road, Ardoyne, Belfast.

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27 March 1982
Stephen Boyd,  (25)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Association (UDA),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Shot while inside King Richard Tavern, Castlereagh Road, Belfast.

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27 March 1984
David Ross,  (31)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by remote controlled bomb, hidden in parked van, detonated when British Army (BA) civilian-type mini bus passed, near Gransha Hospital, Clooney Road, Derry.

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27 March 1985
Anthony Dacre,   (25)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed by remote controlled bomb, hidden behind door, detonated when British Army (BA) foot patrol passed, Divis Flats, Belfast.

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27 March 1992


Colleen McMurray,   (34)

Protestant
Status: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in horizontal mortar attack on Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) armoured patrol car, Merchants Quay, Newry, County Down.

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27 March 1998


Cyril Stewart,  (52)

Protestant
Status: ex-Royal Ulster Constabulary (xRUC),

Killed by: Irish National Liberation Army (INLA)
Shot, outside supermarket, off Dobbin Street Lane, Armagh.

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26th March – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

26th March

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Thursday 26 March 1970

The Police (Northern Ireland) Act became law. The act provided for the disarmament of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) and the establishment of an RUC reserve force. The Act established the Police Authority of Northern Ireland (PANI) which was meant to contain representatives from across the community.

[None of the main Nationalist parties have ever taken part in the PANI.]

Sunday 26 March 1972

William Whitelaw, was appointed as the first Secretary of State for Northern Ireland.

Tuesday 26 March 1974

[ Sunningdale; Ulster Workers’ Council Strike. ]

Friday 26 March 1976

The Prevention of Terrorism Act (1976) took effect in Northern Ireland.

Sunday 26 March 1978

At the Irish Republican Army (IRA) annual Easter Rising commemorations a number of speakers state that the campaign in Northern Ireland would be intensified.

Wednesday 26 March 1980

Announcement of End to Special Category Status

It was announced that as from 1 April 1980 there would be no entitlement to special category status for members of paramilitary organisations regardless of when the crimes had been committed.

[A policy change announced in March 1976 had ended special category status to people sentenced after that date for scheduled offences. The decision to end special category privileges for paramilitary prisoners led to a protest campaign by Republicans in prisons across Northern Ireland. The protests began on 15 September 1976 when Kieran Nugent refused to wear prison issue clothes and covered himself with a blanket; hence the ‘blanket protest’. The protest was to escalate and led eventually to two hunger strikes, one in 1980 and the most serious in 1981.]

Thursday 26 March 1981

Bobby Sands was nominated as a candidate in the by-election in Fermanagh / South Tyrone on 9 April 1981.

Friday 26 March 1982

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) said that it would grant an ‘amnesty’ to any informers who retracted evidence given to the security forces.

 

Thursday 26 March 1987

A feud between the Irish National Liberation Army (INLA) and the Irish People’s Liberation Organisation (IPLO) ended. It had begun with two deaths on 20 January 1987 and in total claimed 11 lives.

Tuesday 26 March 1991

Peter Brooke, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, announced that the political talks (later known as the Brooke / Mayhew talks) would involve a three-strand process. This process was to include relationships within Northern Ireland and achieving a devolved government (‘strand one’ of the talks), between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland (‘strand two’), and between the British and Irish Governments (‘strand three’).

In addition the three strands were to form a complete agreement – ‘nothing is agreed until everything is agreed’.

Friday 26 March 1993

The Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) uncovered five tons of fertiliser in west Belfast. The fertiliser was of a type that was used to manufacture home made bombs.

Tuesday 26 March 1996

The Police Authority published its Consultation Report. The parts of the report dealing with the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) recommended no change to the name, uniform, or oath of allegiance to the Crown. It was suggested that letterheads used by the RUC should include the adjunct, Northern Ireland’s Police Service. David Cook, who had been sacked from the Police Authority on 8 March 1996, claimed that the report had been “watered down”.

Wednesday 26 March 1997

Gareth Doris (19), was shot and seriously wounded by Special Air Service (SAS) undercover soldiers in Coalisland, County Tyrone.

It was alleged that Doris was in the act of throwing a bomb at Coalisland Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) station when he was shot. Seamus Rice, a Catholic priest from the area, escaped injury when his car was hit by SAS bullets.

A confrontation developed between the SAS and local residents and shots were fired in the air to disperse the crowd.

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) planted two bombs at Windslow Railway Station in the north-west of England. The bombs caused widespread disruption to the rail network. The IRA also issued its annual Easter statement in which it confirmed its continuing objective of ending British rule, but added the IRA’s “willingness to facilitate … inclusive negotiations”.

Following the recommendation of the North Report, the five members of the Parades Commission were named. They were: Alistair Graham, Chairman, who was a former trade unionist; Frank Guckian, a businessman; David Hewitt, a solicitor; Roy Magee, a Presbyterian Minister who helped establish the 1994 Loyalist ceasefire; and Berna McIvor (?), who had been John Hume’s election agent. [The appointment of McIvor drew immediate criticisms from the Orange Order.]

Thursday 26 March 1998

The Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) published a Northern Ireland Office (NIO) document which had been leaked to the party. The document set out a detailed plan to try to obtain public support for any agreement reached during the multi-party talks at Stormont. Unionists attacked the document and claimed the government was using deceit and taxpayers money to manipulate public opinion.

Marjorie (Mo) Mowlam, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, defended the document and accused some of her own civil servants and the DUP of not wanting an agreement. Colin Duffy, then a Republican activist based in Armagh, accused the security forces of being behind a series of posters which appeared in the town.

The posters bore the photograph of Duffy and part of the caption read: “This is north Armagh Republican terrorist Colin Duffy. If you see him in a Loyalist area contact the security forces or a leading Loyalist immediately.” Duffy said that he felt that he was being set up for assassination. David Trimble, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), travelled to London for a meeting with Tony Blair, then British Prime Minister. The UUP insisted that the details of the meeting be kept private.

Friday 26 March 1999

A man in the Creggan area of Derry was shot in a paramilitary ‘punishment’ attack. The Loyalist Volunteer Force (LVF) warned that there would be a great strain on its ceasefire if the Irish Republican Army (IRA) did not begin decommissioning. John Hume, then leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), donated all of his £286,000 Nobel Peace Prize cash to victims of violence and poverty in Northern Ireland.

 

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

4 People lost their lives on the 26th March between 1972– 1986

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26 March 1972
Ingram Beckett,   (37)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Association (UDA),

Killed by: Ulster Defence Association (UDA)
Found shot, Conlig Street, Shankill, Belfast. Internal Ulster Defence Association dispute.

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26 March 1973


Samuel Martin,  (33)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: British Army (BA)
Shot by British Army (BA) sniper, from observation post in Newtownhamilton British Army (BA) / Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) base, while walking close to his home along Armagh Street, Newtownhamilton, County Armagh

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26 March 1974


Joseph Hughes,   (25)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed when bomb in parked car exploded as he drove past, Springfield Road, Ballymurphy, Belfast.

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26 March 1986
 Thomas Irwin,  (52)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Shot at his workplace, sewage works, Mountfield, near Omagh, County Tyrone.

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25th March – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

25th March

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Saturday 25(?) May 1968

The Derry Housing Action Committee (DHAC) held another protest at the Guildhall in Derry.

Tuesday 25 March 1969

Ian Paisley and Ronald Bunting were jailed for organising an illegal counter demonstration in Armagh on 30 November 1968.

Thursday 25 March 1971

James Callaghan, then shadow Home Secretary, spoke at a rally of the Northern Ireland labour movement but rejected calls for the Labour Party to open membership to those living in Northern Ireland.

Tuesday 25 March 1975

Harold Wilson, then British Prime Minister, paid a visit to Stormont and announced that an election to the Constitutional Convention would be held in Northern Ireland on 1 May 1975.

Thursday 25 March 1976

‘Police Primacy’ (‘Ulsterisation’)

Merlyn Rees, then Secretary of Sate for Northern Ireland, made a speech in the House of Commons in which he indicated a change in security policy for Northern Ireland. The decision meant that the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) were to take the leading role in security in Northern Ireland; previously this had been the responsibility of the British Army.

[The policy was referred to as ‘police primacy’ and also, by some commentators, as the ‘Ulsterisation’ of the conflict. This referred to the fact that the RUC and the Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR) were to find themselves more and more in the front line. This was reflected in the increase in numbers of personnel in the RUC and the UDR and the reduction in the level of British troops. The policy also lead to a period of poor relations between the police and the army.]

Thursday 25 March 1982

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) killed three British Soldiers during a gun attack on Crocus Street, off the Springfield Road in west Belfast.

Five other people were injured in the attack.

[It was believed that an M-60 machine gun was used in the attack.]

Monday 25 March 1991

Arrangements for Talks Agreed

The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), and the Alliance Party of Northern Ireland (APNI), all agreed to the arrangements for political talks on the future of Northern Ireland. Richard Needham, then a Northern Ireland Office (NIO) Minister, became the first NIO minister to visit Belfast City Hall since the Unionist protest began over the Anglo-Irish Agreement (AIA).

Wednesday 25 March 1992

The Times (a London based newspaper) carried details of an opinion poll that it had commissioned. The poll was carried out by MORI to find out the attitudes of people living in Britain towards Northern Ireland.

Of those questioned, 31 per cent said they were in favour of Northern Ireland becoming independent, 29 per cent favoured the region remaining part of the United Kingdom (UK), and 23 per cent were in favour of a united Ireland.

Thursday 25 March 1993

Castlerock Killings

The Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF), a cover name (pseudonym) used by the Ulster Defence Association (UDA), shot dead four Catholics as they arrived at a building site in Castlerock, County Derry.

A fifth person was injured in the attack.

[A few days later it was revealed that one of the dead men was a member of the Irish Republican Army (IRA).] Later in the day the UFF shot dead Damien Walsh (17), a Catholic civilian, and injured another young Catholic. The Irish Senate, the upper house of the Irish Parliament, held a debate on Northern Ireland. [This was the first debate on the region for eight years.]

Friday 25 March 1994

Mary Robinson, then Irish President, visited Newry, Craigavon, and Derry.

Wednesday 25 March 1998

Mitchell Sets Deadline

After almost two years of talks based at Stormont George Mitchell, then Chairman of the multi-party talks, set a deadline of two weeks for the political parties to reach an agreement. In setting a deadline of 9 April 1998 Mitchell said:

“I believe strongly that we can and will reach an agreement.”

Ronnie Flanagan, then Chief Constable of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC), said that he believed that splinter groups opposed to the peace process had been responsible for some recent Republican violence. [Unionists had been calling for Sinn Féin’s (SF) exclusion from the multi-party talks following a number of recent incidents.] The RUC confirmed that two mortars were fired at a British Army observation post at Glassdrummond, County Armagh. [Dissident Republicans were believed to be responsible for the attack.] Bob Cooper, then Chairman of the Fair Employment Commission, called for the British government to find new ways of increasing the number of Catholics in security related jobs. It was estimated that there had been only a one per cent increase, to 8.4 per cent, in the number of Catholics in security jobs between 1990 and 1997.

Thursday 25 March 1999

The judge hearing the case against a man charged with murdering Robert Hamill in Portadown, County Armagh on 27 April 1997, described some of the actions of Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) officers on that night as “unfortunate”.

The man was cleared of murder but sentenced to 4 years for causing an affray. The Solicitor’s Criminal Bar Association (SCBA) called for the RUC to be removed from the investigation into the murder of Rosemary Nelson who was the solicitor for the Hamill family. Ronnie Flanagan, then Chief Constable of the RUC, rejected these and other similar calls

Saturday 25 March 2000

David Trimble, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), defeated a challenge for the leadership of the UUP from Martin Smyth (Rev.), then Ulster Unionist MP. [Smith gained 43 per cent of the vote. Some commentators believed that the result further weakened Trimble’s position which might later affect the outcome of the peace process.] Trimble failed to stop a motion linking any resumption of the Executive to the retention of the title of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC).

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live forever

– To the Paramilitaries –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

11 People lost their lives on the 25th March between 1972– 1993

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25 March 1972
Patrick Campbell,  (16)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Shot, in error, by other Irish Republican Army (IRA) member, while setting up ambush of British Army (BA) patrol, junction of Springhill Avenue and Springfield Road, Belfast.

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25 March 1977
Larry Potter,  (27)

nfNI
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
From County Monaghan. Killed by booby trap bomb attached to his firm’s minibus, Shore Road, Greenisland, County Antrim.

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25 March 1977
David Graham,  (38)

Protestant
Status: Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Off duty. Died ten days after being shot at his workplace, Coalisland, County Tyrone.

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25 March 1982
Anthony Rapley,   (19)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in machine gun attack on British Army (BA) mobile patrol, Crocus Street, off Springfield Road, Belfast.

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25 March 1982
Nicholas Malakos,  (19)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in machine gun attack on British Army (BA) mobile patrol, Crocus Street, off Springfield Road, Belfast.

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25 March 1982
Daniel Holland,   (22)

nfNI
Status: British Army (BA),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Killed in machine gun attack on British Army (BA) mobile patrol, Crocus Street, off Springfield Road, Belfast

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25 March 1993


James Kelly,   (25)

Catholic
Status: Irish Republican Army (IRA),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot during gun attack on van, as he arrived at his workplace, renovating houses, Gortree Park, Castlerock, County Derry.

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25 March 1993
 James McKenna,  (52)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot during gun attack on van, as he arrived at his workplace, renovating houses, Gortree Park, Castlerock, County Derry.

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25 March 1993


Gerard Dalrymple,  (58)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot during gun attack on van, as he arrived at his workplace, renovating houses, Gortree Park, Castlerock, County Derry.

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25 March 1993
Noel O’Kane,  (20)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot during gun attack on van, as he arrived at his workplace, renovating houses, Gortree Park, Castlerock, County Derry.

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25 March 1993


Damian Walsh,   (17)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Shot at his workplace, Dairy Farm Shopping Centre, Twinbrook, Belfast.

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24th March – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles 

24th March

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Friday 24 March 1972

Announcement of End of Stormont

Edward Heath, then British Prime Minister, announced that the Stormont Parliament was to be prorogued, and ‘Direct Rule’ from Westminster imposed on Northern Ireland from 30 March 1972. The announcement was greeted with outrage from Brian Faulkner and Unionist politicians.

The main reason for the suspension of Stormont was the refusal of Unionist government to accept the loss of law and order powers to Westminster.

[The legislation responsible for direct rule was the Northern Ireland (Temporary Provisions) Act. Under the legislation a new Northern Ireland Office (NIO) was established at Stormont which was supervised by a new Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, William Whitelaw.]

[Whitelaw eased Internment and gave political status to prisoners because of Billy McKee’s hunger strike.] [ Direct Rule. ]

Monday 24 March 1980

The Constitutional Conference / Atkins Talks were adjourned indefinitely at Stormont with little hope that agreement between the various parties would be possible.

Thursday 24 March 1983

The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), and the Alliance Party of Northern Ireland (APNI), all refused invitations to take part in the New Ireland Forum.

Monday 24 March 1986

Margaret Thatcher, then British Prime Minister, wrote a letter to Unionist leaders in which she rejected a demand for a suspension of the Anglo-Irish Agreement (AIA) to allow talks on devolution to begin.

Tuesday 24 March 1987

James Molyneaux, then leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), and Ian Paisley, then leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), called for peaceful protests against the new Public Order legislation on 11 April 1987.

Tuesday 24 March 1992

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) exploded a bomb, estimated at 500 pounds, close to the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) station in Donegall Pass, Belfast. The bomb caused extensive damage to property in the surrounding area

Thursday 24 March 1993

Peter Gallagher (44), a Sinn Féin (SF), member was shot dead by the Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF), a cover name (pseudonym) used by the Ulster Defence Association (UDA), at his place of work on Grosvenor Road, Belfast.

Thursday 24 March 1994

John Fee, then a Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) councillor, was severely beaten by Republicans outside his home in Crossmaglen, south Armagh.

The Northern Ireland Affairs Select Committee was constituted with 6 Conservative members, two Labour, two Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), one Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), one Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), and one Ulster Popular Unionist Party (UPUP) member. James Kilfedder (Sir) was announced as the chairman.

Friday 24 March 1995

British Army (BA) patrols of the greater Belfast area were suspended at midnight.

Monday 24 March 1997

In the Maze Prison a tunnel was discovered leading from H-Block 7 which housed Irish Republican Army (IRA) prisoners. The lapse of security drew criticism from many quarters.

David Templeton (43), who was a Presbyterian minister based at Trinity Church in Greyabbey, died six weeks after he had been the subject of a Loyalist ‘punishment’ attack. He died from a pulmonary embolism after his legs were broken.

The Sunday Life had carried a report, 18 months prior to the attack, that customs officers had found an adult gay pornographic video in his possession. No charges had been brought against Templeton in connection with the video.

[During an inquest on 12 November 1997 the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) said that it believed that the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) was responsible for the attack.]

Tuesday 24 March 1998

Dissident Republicans carried out a mortar attack on an Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) station in south Armagh. It was thought that four mortar bombs had been fired at the police barracks in the village of Forkhill. One was believed to have exploded in the grounds of the base, and another to have landed there without exploding. No one was injured in the attack.

Wednesday 24 March 1999

The Orange Volunteers (OV) carried out a grenade attack on a bar outside of Lurgan, County Armagh. Talks involving pro-Agreement parties took place at Stormont. There were efforts to find common ground between the positions of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) and Sinn Féin (SF).

The possibility of Bertie Ahern, then Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), and Tony Blair, then British Prime Minister, travelling to Belfast was also discussed.

[The two men took part in talks at Hillsborough Castle beginning on 29 March 1999.] Marjorie (Mo) Mowlam, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, stated that she would trigger the d’Hondt mechanism on 2 April 1999.

[D’Hondt was the system for allocating seats in the proposed Executive.]

 

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Remembering all innocent victims of the Troubles

Today is the anniversary of the death of the following people killed as a results of the conflict in Northern Ireland

“To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

– Thomas Campbell

To the innocent on the list – Your memory will live  forever

– To  the Paramilitaries  –

There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for.

 5 People   lost their lives on the 24th March between 1973– 1997

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24 March 1973
John Huddlestone,   (28)

Catholic
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Shot from passing car, outside his home, Durham Street, Belfast.

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24 March 1974


John Hamilton,  (46)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF)
Found shot near his home, Spruce Street, Donegall Pass, Belfast.

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24 March 1975
William Elliott,   (51)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Post office official. Shot when he arrived at the scene of robbery at Silverbridge Post Office, near Crossmaglen, County Armagh.

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24 March 1993


Peter Gallagher,  (44)

Catholic
Status: Civilian Political Activist (CivPA),

Killed by: Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
Sinn Fein (SF) member. Shot at his workplace, Westlink Enterprise Centre, Grosvenor Road, Belfast

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24 March 1997


David Templeton,  (43)

Protestant
Status: Civilian (Civ),

Killed by: non-specific Loyalist group (LOY)
Died six weeks after being badly beaten in his home, Fairview Road, Newtownabbey, County Antrim

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23rd March – Deaths & Events in Northern Ireland Troubles

Another IRA Honey Trap Killing

Belfast Child

Key Events & Deaths on this day in Northern Ireland Troubles

23rd March

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Tuesday 23 March 1971

Faulkner Became Prime Minister

Brian Faulkner succeeds as Northern Ireland Prime Minister after defeating William Craig in a Unionist Party leadership election.

[Faulkner’s tenure of office was to prove very short.]

The Local Government Boundaries (Northern Ireland) Act became law. The Act provided for the appointment of a Boundaries Commissioner to recommend the boundaries and names of district council and ward areas.

Friday 23 March 1973

IRA Honey trap Killings

IRA Honey trap 1

See Below for more details

Three members of the British Army were shot dead by the Irish Republican Army (IRA) in a house in the Antrim Road, Belfast. The soldiers had been lured to the house. A Catholic civilian was shot dead by Loyalists in Belfast.

Saturday 23 March 1974

The Ulster Workers’ Council (UWC), a new Loyalist grouping, issued a…

View original post 1,258 more words

Forkhill Armagh – IRA “Bandit Country”

Belfast Child

Forkhill or Forkill (from Irish: Foirceal) is a small village and civil parish  in south County Armagh, Northern Ireland, in the ancient barony of Upper Orior. It is within the Ring of Gullion and in the 2011 Census it had a recorded population of 498.

It was also one of the most dangerous and unforgiving places on earth for British soldiers and other security force personnel during the 30 year “conflict” and the South  Armagh IRA seemed  able to slaughtered at will and the areas  nickname “Bandit Country” was written in the blood of the innocent.

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BBC Panorama – Bandit Country, South Armagh

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See Below for more details on the South Armagh IRA

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Never forget

They died serving their country

I salute you all!

———————

They shall not grow old,
as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them,
nor the…

View original post 6,328 more words

In memory Sergeant Michael Willetts, GC & all HM Armed Forces murdered by Irish Terrorists.

A short video, set to music, in memory Sergeant Michael G. Willets  and all those members of HM Armed Forces murdered by Irish Terrorists. We salute you all –  memory will live on forever! My…

Source: In memory Sergeant Michael Willetts, GC & all HM Armed Forces murdered by Irish Terrorists.